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Report
Higher Level Questioning
Teachers ask between
300 - 400 questions
each day !
Agenda
 Purpose
 Question traps
 How to use Bloom’s to develop questions.
 Questioning tips
Dart Statements
 I can identify the purpose behind asking questions at a higher
level.
 I can incorporate Bloom’s Taxonomy when developing high
level questions.
 I understand what question space is and can implement this
into my own questioning practice.
Why do we ask questions in the
classroom?
 On your note card, please list 3 reasons
why we ask questions in the classroom.
(Individual Activity)
Why do we ask questions in the
classroom?
 Share your reasons with the members at your table.
Combine, redefine, and / or clarify your responses.
 Generate one top reason for questioning students.
 Each table should be prepared to share and chart their
responses with the group.
What is the purpose for asking
questions?
 To create interest, engage and
challenge
 To check on prior knowledge
 To check for understanding
 To focus thinking on key
concepts and issues
Are you asking the right questions?
Are you...
 Asking too many closed questions
 Yes or No questions
 Short answer recall-based questions
These are Question Traps
How can we avoid these question
traps?
PLANNING
Plan with Bloom’s Taxonomy
 Knowledge – describe, identify, who, when, where
 Comprehension – translate, predict, why
 Application – demonstrate how, solve, try it in a new context
 Analysis – explain, infer, analysis
 Synthesis – design, create, compose
 Evaluation – assess, compare/contrast, judge
Three Little Pigs Activity
 You have a handout in your packet.
 This handout has questions about the story The Three Little
Pigs.
 Identify the level of Bloom’s associate with each question.
Let’s Check It Out!
 1._______Application________What would you have done?
 2. _______Synthesis_____________Can you think of a different ending?
 3.______Knowledge________________What happened in the story?
 4._______Application______________What would you have built your home from?
 5.______Analysis_____________Give examples of how the third pig showed his cunning?
 6.______Comprehension_____________How did the wolf manage to blow down the two homes?
 7.______Knowledge____________Why did the three little pigs have to leave home?
 8._____Evaluation_______________How would you defend the wolf’s action?

9._______Analysis____________Which part of the story did you like best?
PRACTICE IT!
 On your “Practice It!” handout create a question that is from the
lower level of Bloom’s (knowledge, comprehension and
application.) These would include simple questions such as "What
is the chemical formula for water?" or "Who is the main character
in the story?"
 Now try to build on your lower level questions previously
created, by substituting verbs in the question. Create a question
from a higher level, (Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation.)Use
your Bloom’s Key Words handout to find a list of appropriate
verbs to use.
Question Tips
 Plan for Questions
 Allow suitable response time
 Ask open questions
 If you start a lesson with a question, refer back to that
question at the end of the lesson
Good Teachers Don't Answer Their Own
Questions – QUESTION SPACE
Remember to Pause for Thinking!!!
 Q uestion
 S ilence & Waiting Time
 P robing
 A ccepting
 C larifying & Connecting
 E laborating & Extending
SAY IT AIN’T SO!
 DID YOU KNOW THOMAS EDISON WAS KICKED OUT
OF SCHOOL FOR ASKING TOO MANY QUESTIONS!
There are no stupid questions!
The students need to feel safe when
responding to your question or
asking a question of their own.
Do you value student’s responses?
What did Albert have to say?
“In the middle of difficulty lies
opportunity.
The important thing is not to stop
questioning.”

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