Creat

Report
Creating Positive Outcomes
When Conflict Occurs
COSA Professional Development Program
Crowne Plaza Hotel
October 5, 2012
Presented by
Dr. Roger W. Sorochty, Vice President for Enrollment
and Student Services, The University of Tulsa
[email protected]
Purposes of the Program
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To understand the behaviors and “hot buttons”
associated with conflict that can improve or worsen
situations involving conflict
To learn how to use the Conflict Dynamics Profile (CDP)
to minimize destructive behaviors, maximize
constructive behaviors, and manage one’s “hot buttons”
for positive outcomes in conflict situations
To describe how the CDP can be used in professional
staff training and student leadership programs
Provide attendees with a sample of the CDP-I results,
reviewing them using the Development Guide, and
discussing its application on their campuses
Give attendees the chance to take the CDP-I for
themselves
Conflict
Any situation in which people have
apparently incompatible goals, interests,
principles or feelings
CDP Approach

Focuses explicitly on specific behavioral
responses to conflict, and how they
might be changed
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Starts with the assumption that conflict is
inevitable; it cannot, nor should it, be
completely avoided

The goal of successful conflict
management is not its elimination, but to
reduce its harmful effects and maximize
its useful ones
Cognitive Conflict (TaskOriented)

Focuses on ideas, not personalities

Can occur during times of creativity and
productivity

Affect is neutral, or positive

Unrelated, or positively related, to group
functioning
Affective Conflict (Personal)

Focuses on people, not ideas
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Can occur at any time
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Affect is negative

Negatively related to group functioning
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Can escalate rapidly
Path of Conflict
Precipitating Event and/or Hot Buttons
Initiate Conflict
Constructive Responses
Behaviors which keep
conflict to a minimum
Destructive Responses
Behaviors which escalate
or prolong conflict
Task-Focused Conflict
(Cognitive)
Person-Focused Conflict
(Affective)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Focus on task and
problem solving
Positive effect
Tension decreases
Group functioning improves
CONFLICT DE-ESCALATES
•
•
Focused on personal
Negative emotions (anger,
frustration)
Tension increases
Group functioning decreases
CONFLICT ESCALATES
Typical Outcomes of Constructive
Responses
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Win-win solutions
Open & honest communication of feelings
Both parties’ needs are met
Non-judgmental actions
Not sticking adamantly to one position
Actively resolving conflict (not allowing conflict
to continue)
Thoughtful responses (not impulsive)
Team performance improves
Typical Outcomes of Destructive
Responses
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Feelings of anger and frustration
Judgmental actions
Getting even and keeping score
Other party does not have needs met
Closed channels of communication
Refusing to deal with issues
Decreased self-confidence
Tasks not completed
Team performance decreases
Active and Passive Responses to
Conflict
Research has further demonstrated the
usefulness of classifying conflict-related
responses into two additional categories:

Active
Behaviors which involve overt responses, taking
action, or making an effort. The outcome can be
either constructive or destructive.

Passive
Behaviors which involve withholding a response,
not taking action, or not making an effort. The
outcome can be either constructive or
destructive.
Conflict Response Categories
Passive
Active
Constructive
Destructive
Perspective Taking
Winning at All Costs
Creating Solutions
Displaying Anger
Expressing Emotions
Demeaning Others
Reaching Out
Retaliating
Reflective Thinking
Delay Responding
Adapting
Avoiding
Yielding
Hiding Emotions
Self Criticizing
Active Constructive Responses
Those in which the individual takes some overt
action in response to the conflict or provocation,
and as a result there is a beneficial effect on the
course of conflict:

Perspective Taking – Putting yourself in the
other person’s position and trying to
understand that person’s point of view.
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Creating Solutions – Brainstorming with the
other person, asking questions, and trying to
create solutions to the problem.

Expressing Emotions – Talking honestly with
the other person and expressing your thoughts
and feelings.
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Reaching Out – Reaching out to the other
person, making the first move, and trying to make
amends.
Passive Constructive Responses
Those in which the individual responds to the
precipitating event in a less active way—in fact,
some passive responses consist largely of the
decision to refrain from some act—and as a
result there is a beneficial effect on the course
of the conflict:
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Reflective Thinking – Analyzing the situation,
weighing the pros and cons, and thinking about
the best response.
Delay Responding – Waiting things out, letting
matters settle down, or taking a “time out”
when emotions are running high.
Adapting – Staying flexible, and trying to make
the best of the situation.
Active Destructive Responses
Those in which the individual takes some overt
action in response to the conflict or
provocation, but which has a negative,
destructive effect on the course of conflict:
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Winning at All Costs – Arguing vigorously for
your own position and trying to win at all costs.
Displaying Anger – Expressing anger, raising
your voice, and using harsh, angry words.
Demeaning Others – Laughing at the other
person, ridiculing the other’s ideas, and using
sarcasm.
Retaliating – Obstructing the other person,
retaliating against the other, and trying to get
revenge.
Passive Destructive Responses
Those in which the individual responds to the
precipitating event in a less active way, or fails to
act in some way:
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Avoiding – Avoiding or ignoring the other
person, and acting distant and aloof.
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Yielding – Giving in to the other person in
order to avoid further conflict.
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Hiding Emotions – concealing your true
emotions even though feeling upset.
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Self-Criticizing – Replaying the incident over
in your mind, and criticizing yourself for not
handling it better.
CDP Hot Buttons
People who, or situations which, may irritate you
enough to provoke conflict by producing
destructive responses
The “hotter” the hot button, the more likely it is to
produce:
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Strong negative emotions
Feelings of personal provocation
Automatic and impulsive responding
Increased tension
Constructive Responses
Destructive Responses
Hot Buttons
Using the CDP in Staff
Development and Student
Leadership Programs

A case study summary of utilizing the
CDP-I with professional staff
Followed by
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A case study summary of utilizing the
CDP-I with student leaders
Professional Staff
Case Study Summary
CDP-I administered to professional
Residence Life staff and then
debriefed in a two hour program
 CDP-360 could also be used
 Goal was to identify 1 or 2 behaviors
and Hot Buttons that, if addressed
according to the CDP Development
Guide, would enhance their ability to
work together and with their residents

A Snapshot of TU’s Student
Organizations
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140+ active organizations including:
Numerous honor societies including Phi Beta Kappa;
Association of Black Collegians; American Chemical
Society; Student Bar Association; TU Student Nurses
Association; Amnesty International; Numerous
fraternities and sororities; Habitat for Humanity;
Angolan Student Association; Muslim Student
Association; TU Big Brothers Big Sisters; Numerous
Religious Groups, Music Organizations, Governing
Bodies and Intramural Sports Teams
Student Leaders
Case Study Summary

CDP-I administered to students in a
variety of leadership positions and
then debriefed in a two hour program
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Goal was to identify 1 or 2 behaviors
and Hot Buttons that, if addressed
according to the CDP Development
Guide, would enhance their ability to
work with others in their organizations
Additional Ways to Use the CDP
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Campus Police/Security Officers
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HR Staff Development Program
Offerings
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Counselors Working with Students
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Alumni and/or Volunteer Advisors
Turning Knowledge into Action
After determining which behaviors and
hot buttons one wishes to address,
one uses pages 38 – 40 of the
Development Guide to lay out an
action plan
 One can also utilize other resources
available from the Center for Conflict
Dynamics
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Selected Comments from Participants
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I learned that I’m not good at looking at situations
from another’s perspective.
I would delay my responses to avoid displaying
anger or frustration and think about what to say.
I can now recognize my “hot buttons” and I have
the tools to approach those people & situations.
Lessons learned can be applied to my career.
It will help me work with the girls in my sorority
where personal opinions often clash.
What I learned will help me in my leadership role in
a campus ministry.
Thank You
&
Questions

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