Treasures Unit Four Big Question

Report
Unit Four
Exploring the Big Question
“It is not fair to ask of others
what you are not willing to do
yourself.”
~ Eleanor Roosevelt
What is fair and what is not?
Quotes
for
Small Group Facilitated Discussions
“Every time we witness an injustice
and do not act, we train our
character to be passive in its
presence and thereby eventually
lose all ability to defend ourselves
and those we love.”
~ Julian Assange
“Fairness does not mean everyone
gets the same. Fairness means
everyone gets what they need.”
~ Rick Riordan
“Injustice anywhere is a threat to
justice everywhere. We are caught
in an inescapable network of
mutuality, tied in a single garment
of destiny. Whatever affects one
directly, affects all indirectly.”
~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
“We must treat each man on his
worth and merits as a man. We
must see that each is given a
square deal, because he is entitled
to no more and should receive no
less.”
~ Teddy Roosevelt
“Fairness means treating people
equitably, without bias or partiality. It
means actively working to set aside self
interest or group loyalty when rendering
a judgment. In day to day life, fairness
manifests itself in simple ways such as
taking turns, listening intently, sharing,
and not taking advantage of others based
on their weaknesses.”
~ Anonymous
“Justice is a certain rectitude of
mind whereby a man does what he
ought to do in circumstances
confronting him.”
~ Saint Thomas Aquinas
“It is reasonable that everyone who
asks justice should do justice.”
~ Thomas Jefferson
“Though force can protect in
emergency, only justice, fairness,
consideration, and cooperation can
finally lead men to the dawn of
eternal peace.”
~ Dwight D. Eisenhower
Children’s Rhymes
Langston Hughes
By what sends
The white kids
I ain't sent:
I know I can't
Be President.
What don't bug
Them white kids
Sure bugs me:
We know everybody
Ain't free.
Lies written down
For white folks
Ain't for us a-tall:
Liberty And Justice;
Huh! For All!
The Character Chronicles: Fairness
The Story of Human Rights
Fairness and Justice
Human Rights Animation
Reflect: Expository Critique applied to video
2.6 Determine the adequacy and appropriateness of the evidence for an
author’s conclusions.
2.7 Make reasonable assertions about a text through accurate, supporting
citations.
2.8 Note instances of unsupported inferences, fallacious reasoning,
persuasion, and propaganda in text.
A Further Exploration of Justice:
What Is Fair and What Is Not
As a class, we will read, analyze, and discuss the following
pieces in the reading textbook:
“To Captain John Smith” by Powhatan on p. 444
“Eulogy on the Dog” by George Graham Vest on p. 478
“The Wolf and the House Dog/The Donkey and the
Lapdog” by Aesop on p. 502
“The Shutout” by Patricia C. McKissak and Fredrick
McKissak, Jr. on p. 511
Peruse the following selections in your reading
textbook, and choose three selections you would
be interested in reading and discussing in class:
 “Looking for America” by Elizabeth Partridge on p. 450
 “TIME: Dressed for Success?” by Melanie Bertotto on p. 461
 “Romulus and Remus” by Geraldine McCaughrean on p. 469
 “The Southpaw” by Judith Viorst on p. 486
 “Spiders” by Robert Fulghum on p. 493
 “The Circuit” by Francisco Jiménez on p. 524
 “Harvest” excerpt by George Ancona on p. 536
 “Persephone” by Alice Low on p. 540
As you read, you will be thinking about how these stories might relate to the
themes of fairness, what makes you who you are, why you read, and what makes
a hero.
An In-Depth Look at Fairness,
Justice, and Equality
Short Story: “Harrison Bergeron”
by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
Comparing and Contrasting:
Fairness and One Author’s Technique
As a class, we will read, analyze, and discuss the
following pieces in the reading textbook:
 “The Flying Machine” by Ray Bradbury on p. 550
 “All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury on p. 557
Assessments:
Words of Week weekly vocabulary test
Accelerated Reader reading, vocabulary, and literary
analysis test
Treasures Unit 4 Assessment on pp. 576-580
Discussion of fairness and reflections on
justice/equality and the implications for one’s own life
Optional if needed: Treasures individual story
assessments and Treasures formative assessments to
define differentiation
Standards Embedded:
1.0 Word Analysis, Fluency , and Systematic Vocabulary Development
Students use their knowledge of word origins and word relationships, as well as
historical and literary context clues, to determine the meaning of specialized
vocabulary and to understand the precise meaning of grade-level-appropriate
words.
Word Recognition
1.1 Read aloud narrative and expository text fluently and accurately and with
appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression.
Vocabulary and Concept Development
1.2 Identify and interpret figurative language and words with multiple meanings.
1.3 Recognize the origins and meanings of frequently used foreign words in
English and use these words accurately in speaking and writing.
1.4 Monitor expository text for unknown words or words with novel meanings by
using word, sentence, and paragraph clues to determine meaning.
1.5 Understand and explain “shades of meaning” in related words (e.g., softly and
quietly).
2.0 Reading Comprehension (Focus on Informational Materials)
Students read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. They describe
and connect the essential ideas, arguments, and perspectives of the text by
using their knowledge of text structure, organization, and purpose. In addition,
by grade eight, students read one million words annually on their own.
Structural Features of Informational Materials
2.1 Identify the structural features of popular media (e.g., newspapers,
magazines, online information) and use the features to obtain information.
2.2 Analyze text that uses the compare-and-contrast organizational pattern.
Comprehension and Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
2.3 Connect and clarify main ideas by identifying their relationships to other
sources and related topics.
2.4 Clarify an understanding of texts by creating outlines, logical notes,
summaries, or reports.
2.5 Follow multiple-step instructions for preparing applications (e.g., for a
public library card, bank savings account, sports club, league membership).
Expository Critique
2.7 Make reasonable assertions about a text through accurate, supporting
citations.
3.0 Literary Response and Analysis
Students read and respond to historically or culturally significant works of
literature that reflect and enhance their studies of history and social science.
They clarify the ideas and connect them to other literary works.
Structural Features of Literature
3.1 Identify the forms of fiction and describe the major characteristics of each
form.
Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
3.2 Analyze the effect of the qualities of the character (e.g., courage or
cowardice, ambition or laziness) on the plot and the resolution of the conflict.
3.3 Analyze the influence of setting on the problem and its resolution.
3.5 Identify the speaker and recognize the difference between first- and thirdperson narration (e.g., autobiography compared with biography).
3.6 Identify and analyze features of themes conveyed through characters, actions,
and images.
3.7 Explain the effects of common literary devices (e.g., symbolism, imagery,
metaphor) in a variety of fictional and nonfictional texts.
Additional Standard Embedded in Poem of the Day:
3.4 Define how tone or meaning is conveyed in poetry through word choice,
figurative language, sentence structure, line length, punctuation, rhythm,
repetition, and rhyme.
Expository Critique
2.7 Make reasonable assertions about a text through accurate, supporting
citations.
Additional Standard Embedded in comparison study
of Sci-Fi/Fantasy short stories:
Literary Criticism
3.8 Critique the credibility of characterization and the degree to which a plot is
contrived or realistic (e.g., compare use of fact and fantasy in historical fiction).
Reading Standards Not Addressed in the Unit:
Expository Critique
2.6 Determine the adequacy and appropriateness of the evidence for an
author’s conclusions.
2.8 Note instances of unsupported inferences, fallacious reasoning,
persuasion, and propaganda in text.

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