*A Tale of Two Cities* Character Project

Report
“A Tale of Two Cities”
Character Project
BY: Clara Chen, Brenda Ji, Helen Lee
AP Lit, Period 3
Quote
“It’s enough for you...to be the wife of a honest
tradesman, and not to occupy your female mind with
calculations when he took to his trade or when he
didn’t. A honouring and obeying wife would let his
trade alone altogether. Call yourself a religious woman?
If you’re a religious woman, give me a irreligious one!
You have no more nat’ral sense of duty than the bed of
this here Thames river has of a pile, and similarly it
must be knocked into you” (Dickens 164).
Traits
-Abusive, especially
toward his wife
-Short-tempered
-Hypocritical
-Insecure
-Superstitious
Lit Devices
-Dialogue characterizes Jerry Cruncher as a short-tempered and abusive
husband. He is constantly yelling at her, especially when she is praying.
He does not even bother to listen to her, showing that he does not treat
her with respect and thinks mostly of himself.
-Irony shows how hypocritical Jerry Cruncher is when he calls himself an
honest tradesman. He is a grave robber, who digs up corpses and sells
them to medical students, surgeons, and scientists for money. The work
he is involved in is immoral and wrong, not honest and good.
-The rhetorical question Cruncher asks his wife emphasizes the
disrespectful way he treats her. It shows how he does not want to hear
her answer and does not appreciate her efforts in praying.
Function
Main Function: Jerry Cruncher is
the man who takes care of
business and does the dirty work.
-He is a messenger, delivering
news to people.
-He is a grave robber
(“Resurrection Man”) who digs up
dead bodies for doctors and
scientists.
Importance of Function
-His role provides a window into the upper class through the eyes of the
lower class. It also gives the reader information about the different
situations, such as the “Recalled to Life” message, court trial, and funeral
of Cly.
-His character provides comedic relief, parodying resurrection through his
job as a grave robber.
-His abusive relationship with his wife contrasts with Darnay’s sweet and
caring relationship with Lucie.
Metaphor/Symbol
-
Nocturnal
Known to be bandits
Black and spiky hair
Short tempered
Probably superstitious
Attack when they feel
threatened
Allusion
- “Mr.
Cruncher sat watching the two streams,
like the heathen rustic who has for centuries
been on duty watching one stream--saving
that Jerry had no expectation of their ever
running dry.” (Chapter 14)
-In Greek Mythology, Charon is the ferryman
of the dead in service of Hades through the
river, Styx.
-Likewise, Jerry is subordinate in both his
work as a “resurrection-man” and as a
messenger for Tellson’s.
-Moreover, Jerry’s name is an allusion in
itself. His initials and his real name,
Jeremiah, suggest the prophetic aspect of
his character.
Theme Song
“Ain’t No Rest for the Wicked” - Cage the Elephant
(chorus)
There ain't no rest for the wicked
Money don't grow on trees
I got bills to pay
I got mouths to feed
Ain't nothing in this world for free
No I can't slow down
I can't hold back
Though you know I wish I could
No there ain't no rest for the wicked
Until we close our eyes for good

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