Local Control Accountability Plan Development

Report
Local Control
Accountability Plan
Development
WELCOME
February 11, 2014
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Group Norms
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Appreciative Inquiry
“Every great dream begins with a
dreamer. Always remember, you have
within you the strength, the patience, and
the passion to reach for the stars to
change the world.”
Harriet Tubman (1820-1913)
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LCAP Section 1
Stakeholder Engagement
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Subgroups are considered numerically significant if there
are 30 or more students with the exception of Foster Youth
where 15 students are considered numerically significant.
Other Subgroups
Racial/Ethnic Subgroups
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Black or African American
American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian
Filipino
Hispanic or Latino
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
White
Two or more races
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English Learners
Low Income
Students with Disabilities
Foster Youth
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Required Representation from
Parent Groups
If students are part of one or more of
these subgroups, parents or families must
be included in the Parent Advisory Group.
Parent Advisory
Group
EL Parent Advisory
Group (if district
enrollment includes):
Low
Income rep
15% ELs
Foster
Youth rep
At least 50
EL pupils
English
Learner rep
Members of pre-existing committees
(ELAC/DELAC) can be included in the
LCAP EL Parent Advisory Committee.
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Definition of “consult”
The determination of curriculum content, the selection of instructional
materials, and the use of instructional technology are subject to the
duty to "consult" under Government Code Section 3543.2(a).
"Consultation" (also known as "meet and confer") involves the free
exchange of information, opinions, informal proposals, and
recommendations according to orderly procedures in a
conscientious effort to incorporate such recommendations into
the resulting policy or plan.
The Fiscal Report (2013)
School Services of California, Inc.
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Obligation to “negotiate”
While LEAs have an obligation to "consult," they do not have an
obligation to "meet and negotiate" implementation decisions.
"Establishing educational policies, goals and objectives,"
"determining curriculum," and "establishing budgetary priorities and
allocations" are all fundamental management prerogatives not
within the mandatory scope of bargaining…
The Fiscal Report (2013)
School Services of California, Inc.
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Obligation to “negotiate”
(continued)
However, if such decisions would have a foreseeable impact on
negotiable "terms and conditions of employment" for bargaining
unit members, a school district or COE is required to negotiate the
"effects" or "impacts" of these decisions on negotiable subjects,
including for example, hours of employment and compensation for
professional development.
The Fiscal Report (2013)
School Services of California, Inc.
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Adopting and Updating the
LCAP: District
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AB 1200 & LCAP
Time Frames
AB 1200
January 15-16, 2014
LCAP
SBE approves Spending
Regulations
March 2014
3/15: 2nd Interim Report
Template has been approved
March - April 2014
LCFF does not change
timelines under the AB1200
fiscal oversight process
COE Business & Instructional
staff available for individual
district appointments
April – May 2014
1.
COE Business & Instructional
staff available for individual
district appointments
2.
Update projected
enrollments & ADA
Project revenues &
expenses of
subsequent fiscal year
May – June 2014
Public Hearing for budget
District Public Hearing for
LCAP prior to adoption
May – June 2014
District approves budget
District adopts LCAP
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Stakeholder Engagement
• Table discussion:
What has your district/charter school
done to provide meaningful stakeholder
engagement, or what are your plans for
doing so?
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LCAP Stakeholder Engagement
Timeline
Community
Input/Needs
Assessment
Develop LCAP
Draft Plan
Hold public
hearing for
draft input
• no later than March 30
Finalize LCAP
Local Board
Approval
LCAP
submitted to
KCSOS
• required by June 30
• not more than 5 days following Board approval
13
Stakeholder Engagement
• District team time:
• Using the graphic organizer provided,
backwards map your stakeholder
engagement activities to meet a March 30,
2014 public hearing/local board meeting
deadline and a June 30th LCAP local board
approval.
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15
SWOT Analysis
Strengths
(internal)
Weaknesses
(internal)
Opportunities
(external)
Threats
(external)
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SWOT Process
•
Question:
What are the important factors in achieving our goals?
Strengths:
What resources / capabilities do we have that can
be used to our advantage?
Weaknesses:
What could you improve?
What internal issues do we need to address to be
successful?
Opportunities:
What opportunities are out there that we should
use to our advantage? Trends? Stakeholder
input?
Threats:
What threats exist that we need to pay attention
to that could impact success?
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SWOT Process
• Whether a factor is a strength or a weakness
depends upon the effect on goal achievement.
• Factor A is a strength if it furthers the
achievement of the goal.
• Factor A is a weakness if it is an obstacle to
goal achievement.
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SWOT Process
As we identify our strengths and weaknesses, what evidence can you cite to
support your claim?
Sample evidence:
• Credentialed Teachers
• CELDT/English Learner Progress
• Suspension & Expulsion Rates
• Local Measures of School Connectedness
• Advanced Placement
• Student Demographics
• Technology
• Professional Development Plan
• Parent Involvement
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SWOT Process Sample
Statements
• Strengths:
– All teachers are fully credentialed in their
assigned area
– 80% Parent Engagement in School Activities
– 97% Average Attendance Rate
– 68% EL Reclassification Rate
– 98% High School Graduation Rate
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SWOT Process Sample
Statements
• Weaknesses:
o Student attendance rate is 72%
o Low parental attendance
o Instructional practices
o 60% increase in student suspension
o ELLs are not making significant progress
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SWOT Process Sample
Statements
Opportunities: Trend or a New Start
• Stakeholder Engagement
• Implementation of CC provides for new
strategies, new technology applications, 21st
Century skills
• Stakeholder Engagement
• Computer-adapted Assessment
• No API (K-8)
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SWOT Process Sample
Statements
• Threats:
• Internal
External
• Union Negotiations
Educational
Legislation
• Lack of Implementation Economy
(CC, ELD, Intervention)
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SWOT Team Time
• Team Time:
• Please complete a SWOT analysis for
your district using the graphic organizer
provided.
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“Current Reality”
Table discussion:
1.What types of data are you using as a metric to
determine your “current reality” for each of the state’s
eight priorities?
2.What weaknesses were identified in your SWOT
analysis from data you have?
3.What is your “current reality” for each of the eight
priorities?
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LCFF and LCAP Budget
Planning
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Supplemental/Concentration
Grant Funds
Supplemental and Concentration Grant Funds are generated by the
number of English Learner (EL), Low Income (LI) and Foster Youth
(FY) students in the district, charter, or county office of education.
Collectively, these students are referred to as “unduplicated pupils” in
the statute and regulations.
Regulations adopted by January 31, 2014:
– Will require district, county office of education or charter to
“increase or improve services for EL/LI/FY pupils as compared
to the services provided to all pupils in proportion to the increase
in funds apportioned on the basis of the number and
concentration of unduplicated pupils.”
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Proportionality Percentage
Estimates
• The State Board of Education provides regulations
that describe the methodology of determining the proportional
increase or improvement in services for unduplicated pupils.
• LEAs will estimate their proportion using current and accurate local
enrollment projections performed in the spring for use in their LCAP
adoption process.
– ADA, by grade level
– Total enrollment
– Total unduplicated pupils
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Calculating the Proportionality Percentage
For Districts and Charters, begin with the FCMAT LCFF
Calculator:
• Calculate the estimated LCFF Funding Target, (Cell
Q16, of the Calculator Tab), of the FCMAT LCFF
Calculator
• Calculate the 2014-15 Total LCFF Funding (Q78, of the
Graphs Tab), of the FCMAT LCFF Calculator
http://www.fcmat.org/stories/storyReader$23157
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Calculating the Proportionality Percentage
1. Calculate the LCFF supplemental and concentration grant targets,
at full implementation (Cell O16 + P16, of the Calculator Tab), of
the FCMAT LCFF Calculator.
2. Determine prior year expenditures to support unduplicated pupils.
 No less than the amount of EIA expended in 2012-13
3. Subtract the estimated 2013-14 expenditures from the
supplemental and concentration grant target.
4. Multiply the difference by the Department of Finance’s gap
percentage funding for the year in which the LCAP is adopted.
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Calculating the Proportionality Percentage
(continued)
5.
6.
7.
8.
Add to the LEA’s prior year estimated expenditures from step 2.
Subtract the amount in step 5 from the total LCFF funding in 201415.
Divide the approximate amount from step 5 by the amount in
step 6.
If the amount in step 3 is less than or equal to zero, or when the
LCFF is fully implemented statewide, then the proportion is
calculated by dividing the total supplemental and concentration
grants at target by the remainder of the LCFF funding, excluding
add-ons for TIIG and H-S Transportation.
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Sample Calculations for Six Districts
C alcu latin g p ro p o rtio n ality o f in cre ase in Su p p le m e n tal an d C o n ce n tratio n re v e n u e s an d th re sh o ld e x p e n se le v e l
1
2
Ste p 3
Ste p 4
Ste p 5
Ste p 6
Ste p 8
(= > 12-13 E IA)
(1-2)
11.80%
(2 + Ste p 4)
T a rg e t S& C
E IA E xp
S& C e xp
2014-15
x Ste p 3
2014-15
14-15
2014-15
M PP a t
14-15
12-13
13-14
D iff
S& C inc re a s e
S& C R e v
E ntitle me nt
L C AP B a s e
M PP
T a rg e t
2014-15
L C FF
%
Ste p 7
Sa mple D is tric t A
38%
50,589
10,470
10,470
40,119
4,734
15,204
865,958
850,754
1.8%
6%
Sa mple D is tric t B
17%
337,283
67,424
67,424
269,859
31,843
99,268
12,413,006
12,313,738
0.8%
2%
Sa mple D is tric t C
7%
103,984
24,982
24,982
79,002
9,322
34,304
7,661,795
7,627,491
0.4%
1%
Sa mple D is tric t D
67%
35,256
8,701
8,701
26,555
3,134
11,834
143,276
131,442
9.0%
21%
Sa mple D is tric t E
13%
81,547
7,548
7,548
73,999
8,732
16,280
1,906,996
1,890,716
0.9%
4%
Sa mple D is tric t F
10%
212,904
44,567
44,567
168,337
19,864
64,431
9,176,342
9,111,911
0.7%
2%
% of unduplicated students from 2012-13 CalPADs certification
MPP = Minimum Proportionality Percentage
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Important Considerations
• The amount of revenue limit and categorical funds in
2012-13 is the starting point for LCFF.
– No LEA will receive less than this amount.
• Total revenues received will fluctuate proportionate to
changes in ADA and changes in unduplicated pupils.
• Full implementation of LCFF is estimated to occur
over an 8-year period.
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LCFF and LCAP Budget
Planning
• FCMAT Calculator
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LCAP Section 2: Goal
Development
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LCAP Goal Development
Considerations
•
LCAP Goals should be derived from the district’s vision for
its students. However…
•
Goals will need to identify which of the 8 state priorities
they will support, and some goals may serve multiple
priorities. And…
•
The combined goals will need to address all 8 of the state’s
priorities.
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Goal Development Considerations
Goals should be developed so that they are
SMART:
S:
M:
A:
R:
T:
Specific
Measurable
Attainable
Relevant
Time-bound
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LCAP Goal Development
Process
Engage and consult
with stakeholder
groups.
Considering stakeholder
input, develop a vision for
the district for all students
including all significant
subgroups.
Determine “current
reality” by reviewing all
available data sources for
district priorities and each
of the eight state
priorities.
Formulate SMART
goals to address gaps
and identify metrics
by which each will be
measured.
Define gaps between the
district’s vision and the
district’s “current reality”
derived from the needs
assessment conclusions.
Summarize data into
objective statements and
translate into “current
reality” (eg.: 50% of
students….) i.e. develop
conclusions.
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LCAP Goal Development Process
Step 1: Engage and consult with all stakeholder groups
Step 2: Develop a vision for all students and all
student groups. Keep the language simple.
Examples:
• 100% of English language learner students entering
kindergarten will be reading, writing, speaking and listening in
English proficiently by the end of 3rd grade.
• 95% of all students will meet grade-level content standards
based upon a local assessment.
• All high school students will have access to courses that satisfy
the A-G requirements.
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LCAP Goal Development Process
Step 3: Gather and review all pertinent data sources for the
district as well as data sources related to the state’s
eight priorities.
Seek input from all stakeholders:
In light of the district’s vision for __________________,
what would you suggest the district do differently?
Maintain focus on the district’s vision to avoid de-railing the conversations.
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LCAP Goal Development Process
Step 4: Summarize all data sources from the needs
assessment and develop conclusions. Examples:
• Implementation of Common Core:
1) 50% of the district’s teachers have had
professional development in the CCSS.
2) Classroom observation data indicates that teachers are embedding the
mathematical practice standards into math lessons about 25% of the time
(partial implementation).
3) The district’s R/LA curriculum is supplemented
with CCSS standards but is not fully aligned.
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LCAP Goal Development Process
Step 5: Define gaps and develop conclusions.
Examples:
1) Common Core state standards are partially
implemented.
2) 50% of Grade 3 English learners who entered our
district in K are not English proficient by the end of
grade 3.
3) The district’s rate of long-term English learners is
30%.
4) The district’s truancy rate is X%.
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LCAP Goal Development Process
Step 6: Develop SMART goals (4-7) to address gaps
District’s vision
- (minus)
Current Reality (data)
________________________________
= (equals) Gaps (which translate into goals for the next three
years)
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LCAP Goal Writing
Example:
Vision: 100% of English language learner students
entering kindergarten will be reading, writing,
speaking and listening in English proficiently by
the end of 3rd grade.
Current 50% of 3rd grade English learner students who
Reality: entered our district in K are English proficient by
the end of 3rd grade.
Goal:
The district will increase English proficiency rates
of English learner students in grades K-3 to 80%
by 2017.
SMART goal or not?
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LCAP Goal Writing
More examples:
1) The district will fully implement Common Core State Standards
by 2014-15.
2)
The district will reduce its truancy rate from X% to
X% by 2017.
3)
The district will reduce its percentage of long-term
English learners from x% to X% by 2017, or by X%
per year through 2017.
Goals will define the “what” of the LCAP and action steps will define
the “how”.
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LCAP Goal Reminders
1) Goals are based upon the district’s vision and
priorities.
2) The goals, spanning the three years of the LCAP, must
address all eight of the state’s LCFF priorities.
3) One goal may address multiple state priorities… and
4) The district does is NOT required to develop a goal for
each state priority.
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Christine Lizardi Frazier
Kern County Superintendent of Schools
Advocates for Children…
Summary of
Stakeholder Input
Vision
Current
Data: Current Reality/ Reality Summarized / Gaps fined =
Goals
District Priority 1
District Priority 2
District Priority 3
District Priority 4
District Priority 5
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LCAP Homework
Due: February 18th
1) Conduct FCMAT calculator calculations and
determine the district’s proportionality
2) Continue to hold (or plan) stakeholder
engagement activities for all stakeholder groups.
3) Begin to draft/review LCAP Section 2 goals.
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