Effective Tier I Instruction for English Language Learners (ELLs)

Report
Effective Tier I Instruction for
English Language Learners
(ELLs)
Seyyed Ahmad Fatemi‫سمیر فاطمی‬Samir Fatemi‫سید احمد فاطمی‬
Norms
Be an engaged participant
Respect the opinions of others
Cell phones to vibrate
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PURPOSE:
To assist educators in providing high-quality Tier I instruction for
English Language Learners.
GOAL:
By the end of day II, participants will be able to provide systematic
instructional practices to meet the academic and linguistic needs of
ELLs and provide support to colleagues through data teams and/or
trainings to improve instruction for ELLs.
EXPECTATIONS:
By the end of day I of training, participants will be familiar with the
foundations of language learning, learning expectations for ELLs, and
some instructional practices that are most effective with ELLs.
By the end of day II training, participants will deepen their knowledge
of instructional strategies for ELLs in order to enhance instruction for
ELLs and support colleagues through data teams and/or trainings.
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Agenda – Day 1
Module 1: Best Practices for All Students – Effective Tier I
Instruction
Module 2: Foundations in Second Language
Learning
Module 3: Getting to Know Your ELLs – Implications for
Teaching and Learning
Module 4: Instructional Strategies for ELLs
What
is
CALI?
Module 1:
Best Practices for All Students –
Effective Tier I Instruction
Strategic Decision-Making
SRBI Framework for Student Achievement
7
SRBI Tier 1 Instruction Overview
Focus
For ALL students (including bilingual and English
language learners, special education students)
Curriculum
and
Instruction
Scientifically and evidence based curriculums
that are culturally relevant and implemented
with fidelity
Grouping
Multiple grouping formats to meet student
needs (whole group, flexible grouping for
differentiated instruction, individualized
instruction)
Northeast Regional Resource Center
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SRBI Tier 1 Instruction Cont’d
Instructional
Time
Appropriate to the content area and
developmental level of the student
Assessments
Universal Common Assessments,
benchmark assessments, common
formative assessments, summative
assessments, Curriculum Based
Measures
Interventionist
General education teacher with
collaboration from school specialists
Setting
General education classroom
Northeast Regional Resource Center
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Tier I Instruction and ELLs
“The first step in following the RTI [SRBI] model is
ensuring that general education instruction
reflects best practice and meets the students’
academic and linguistic needs. For ELLs who
struggle, we need to consider what instructional
accommodations are necessary for them to
succeed academically.”
- Center for Research on the Educational Achievement and Teaching of
English Language Learners
Best Practices in CT
What is good teaching?
1. Individually examine the Common Core
of Teaching.
2. Which indicators of each domain do you
think are most important for ELLs?
3. Small Group Discussion: Groups discuss
and select 6 that they feel are most
relevant to ELLs.
Module 2: Foundations in Second
Language Learning
 Myths and Realities
 Second Language Acquisition Theory
True or False
The younger students are, the easier it is to
pick up a second language.
Once ELLs can converse comfortably in
English, they no longer need ESL support.
Parents should speak English at home with their
(ELL) children so they can learn English faster.
Effective teaching practices for ELLs also
benefit native speaking students.
True or False (cont.)
Students that can speak more than one
language have cognitive advantages.
You cannot learn to read in two languages
simultaneously.
Oral language development is
important for developing literacy skills.
Schools should immerse students in English.
Two Types of Language
•Conversational Language
•Academic Language
Source: Jim Cummins
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Examples of Conversational vs.
Academic Language
Conversational:
My idea is like ___’s idea.
Academic:
My idea is similar to ____’s idea.
I agree with ______’s perspective. I also
think that ….
Stages of Second Language Acquisition
Stage
General Time
Frame
Characteristics
Teacher prompts
Pre-production
0-6 Months
Student understands very little
English. May be in silent period or
only give one or two word
responses.
Show me..
Draw..
Point to…
Early production
6 months –
1 year
Student has limited understanding
of English and produces 1 or two
word responses. May understand
more than he/she can express
Yes or no questions
Either/or questions
Lists
Labels
Speech Emergence
1-3 years
Student understands most
conversational English, but not
academic language and idioms.
Can produce simple sentences, but
makes grammar and pronunciation
errors. Still has limited vocabulary.
Why..?
How..?
Explain..
Short answer questions
Intermediate Fluency
and Advanced
Fluency
3-5 years and
5-7 years
Speaks in fluent sentences using
standard grammar. May have
difficulty understanding complex
content area materials. Limited
understanding of less commonly
used words and subtleties in
language.
What do you think would
happen if..?
Why do you think..?
How do you use
L1 to build L2?
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Foundations of Language
Try to figure out this math problem:
Tuusin and suma ng lahat ng numero sa
ibaba at kalkulahin ang promedyo.
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18
27
25
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How were you able figure it out?
Prefixes, Suffixes, and
Word Roots
Layers of
Language
Other
5%
Greek – 10%
(Content area words)
Latin - 60%
(Content area words)
Anglo-Saxon – 25%
(Dolch words)
Implications
Teaching word patterns can help students decode and
connecting these patterns to prefixes, suffixes and root
words with meaning can help students better
comprehend text.
Students with a Latin or Greek-based L1 can benefit
from explicit instruction on using cognates.
Note – The National Literacy Panel on Language Minority
Children and Youth found that students need extensive
oral language development and practice using rich, oral
language in addition to instruction on the 5 components
of reading (phonological awareness, phonics, fluency,
comprehesion and vocabulary)
What other vocabulary might a
newcomer know?
Can you name some more?
If you do
need to
teach
phonics,
rethink
the
alphabet
You are a Japanese Language Learner.
Does this picture help you?
What sound does
make?
What sound does
make?
=
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15 Minute Break
Module 3:
Getting to Know Your Students –
Implications for Teaching and
Learning
Scenario - Two new students
Ahmed is from Pakistan.
Etleva is from Serbia
What else do you want to know about them?
What do you want to know?
What language do they speak at home?
How much English do they know?
How much prior schooling do they have?
When did they come to U.S.?
Do their parents speak English?
What is the education level of their
parents?
How to Create a Welcoming
Environment (CCT Domain 2)
Survival cards
Tour of the school (nurse, principal, cafeteria, gym)
Labeling the classroom and school
Buddy
Map and pictures of native country
Teach entire class about culture and language
Pronounce their name correctly
Connect parents to someone in the community who speaks the
same home language
Find cultural resources in neighboring towns
Back to Our Data Search Resources
Home language survey
Knowledge about native language and cultural
background (http://www.omniglot.com). How are L1
and L2 similar and different?
LAS Links/English language proficiency test results
Standardized test results DRA, CMT, CAPT
Prior services and schooling (in and outside of U.S)
Attendance data
Literacy in their first language
Parents’ literacy and educational level
CAPPELL
LAS Links
What does the LAS Links assess?
Speaking
Listening
Reading
Writing
What do LAS Links Levels mean?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Understanding the LAS Links
Who has them? How are they shared?
How do you use LAS Links results?
What did we find out about Ahmed
and Etleva?
Ahmed
New to the U.S. Never attended a U.S.
school
Parents don’t speak English. Family
speaks Urdu
No records from school in Pakistan
(suspect interrupted schooling)
LAS Links – Level 1 on all 4 domains
Etleva
Transferred from neighboring district
Has been in U.S. for 3 years
Speaks Serbian at home
Parents are professionals and speak some
English
LAS Links – 3 Overall (4-Speaking, 4Listening, 3-Reading, 2-Writing)
CMT/CAPT- Basic in all areas
How do we plan, instruct, and assess
(domains 3-5 of CCT) for learning for
Ahmed and Etleva?
We will return to this on Day 2
Quick Write
What are the important ideas from today?
What can you do differently and/or
implement after today?
What questions do you have that you
would like addressed during Day 2?
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Homework for Day 2
Using what you’ve learned today, you will:
 Create or revise a lesson plan using
sheltered instructional strategies.
 Implement the lesson plan.
 Reflect on the lesson.
 Bring copies of the lesson plan and an
electronic copy and be prepared to
present to the group.
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Day 2
Module 4:
Instructional Strategies for ELLs
Effective ELL Instruction:
2 Things to Think About
Comprehensible
Input
Opportunities
for Output
AhmedA Word about Newcomers
“Special populations such as newcomer
students may need a specialized program
to accelerate their learning of English, their
acculturation to U.S. schooling practices
and basic content information.”
Source: Debora Short and Shannon Fitzsimmons. Double the work: Challenges
and solutions to acquiring language and academic literacy for adolescent
ELLs, 2007
How do we help Etleva instructionally?
Focus on Language and Content
Develop language and grade level content skills
Tailor instruction based on her language
proficiency levels focusing on what she needs in
each domain
Monitor both language and content proficiency
using appropriate assessments. Modify contentbased assessments based on language
proficiency
How can you monitor students’
language development?
Observation checklists
Language assessments
LAS Links Benchmarks
Activate Your Prior Knowldge
Using the graphic organizer, think about effective
teaching strategies you use and why they are effective
and jot them down.
Now work with a partner and share the instructional
strategies you selected.
Now work in groups of 4 or 5 as a table to further share
out the instructional strategies you used.
First assign roles: Facilitator, Notetaker, Summarizer
and Presenter.
Video #1: Math – Grade 3 Division
What instructional strategies does the
teacher use?
How would you modify/enhance the
instructional strategies to make content
comprehensible and increase
opportunities for output?
http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=880
Use graphic organizer (Supplemental Materials
Packet, p.3) to take notes
Summary of Effective ELL Strategies
Use of visuals, gestures, realia, hands-on tasks
Frontloading/explicit instruction for concepts and
vocabulary (including academic language)
Scaffolding information – modified text, graphic
organizers, sentence frames and stems, modified and
alternate text, note taking, listening guides, info gap
activities
Adjusting teacher speech - shorter sentences, use of
idioms, pace and clarity of speech, saying many different
ways
Frequent opportunities for language practice (small
group cooperative learning, think-pair-share, numbered
heads)
Safe environment for speaking (think-pair-share, whisper
to me, etc.)
Video #2: English
What instructional strategies does the
teacher use?
How would you modify/enhance the
instructional strategies to make content
comprehensible and increase
opportunities for output?
http://www.learner.org/resources/series169.html?pop=yes&pid=1827
Use graphic organizer (Supplemental Materials
Packet, p.10) to take notes
Resources
August, D. & Shanahan, T. Eds. (2006). Executive Summary: Developing Literacy in
Second-Language Learners: Report of the National Literacy Panel on LanguageMinority Children and Youth. Retrieved from
http://www.cal.org/projects/archive/nlpreports/executive_summary.pdf
Connecticut RESC Alliance. (2010). CT State PowerPoint for Boards of Education and
ELL Strategy Cards. Retrieved from http://www.ctlearning.net/ell/
Echevarria, Short & Vogt. (2000). Making Content Comprehensible for English Language
Learners: the SIOP Model.
Marzano, R. (2001). Classroom Instruction that Works.
Marzano,R. & Pickering, D. (2005). Building Academic Vocabulary.
U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences. (2007). What Works
Clearinghouse: Effective Literacy and English Language Instruction for English
Learners in the Elementary Grades. Retrieved from
http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/pdf/practiceguides/20074011.pdf
Useful websites
www.omniglot.com
www.capellct.org
www.colorincolorado.org
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