Volunteer Development: Your Best Bet for Success - 4

Report
Volunteer Development:
Your Best Bet for Success
Originally
presented by:
Carolyn Ashton,
Oregon State
University
Dale Leidheiser,
Univ. of California
Cooperative
Extension
Linda Schultz,
New Mexico State
University
And Steve Dasher,
Colorado State
University
at the 2009 Western
4-H Institute
Edited and Adapted by Dale Larson for use at Washington State University
4-H Youth Development:
By the Numbers (in Washington)
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17
75,245
6,583
200
$19.51
$25.7M
69%
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# of professional 4-H FTE’s
# of 4-H youth
# of 4-H volunteers
Hours/year volunteered
Value of volunteer time
Total value of 4-H volunteers
Female
Value of Volunteers (in billions of dollars)
300.0
280
250.0
225.9
239
210.6
200.0
182.3
176.4
169.6
150.0
149.0
100.0
1987
1989
1991
1993
1995
1998
2001
2004
U.S. Volunteer Rate
Don't
Volunteer
Volunteer
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
Did You Ask?
Percentage of people who
volunteer when not asked
Percentage of people who
volunteer when asked
71%
Yes
50%
No
50%
29%
Independent Sector
2001 Giving and Volunteering in the United States
Those least likely to be asked:
(percent of population not asked)
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Income below $20K
Retirees age 65 and over
Singles
Persons aged 18 - 24
Divorced
African-Americans
Hispanics
67%
65%
63%
63%
63%
62%
56%
VOLUNTEERS IN WASHINGTON STATE 4-H YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
In 2008 6,583 adult volunteers were involved in Extension Youth
programs, a decrease of 72 over the previous year.
Of these, 5,134 (78%) were women and 1,449 (22%) were men.
756 members were enrolled as youth volunteers.
Reported adult and youth volunteers totaled 7,339.
4-H Volunteers
Adult Women
5,188
69%
Total Adult Volunteers = 6,583
Total Youth Leaders = 756
Extension Volunteer Research
• Volunteers say Extension could do a
better job of:
– matching skills with tasks positions
– providing training to fill gaps
– giving feedback and providing
evaluation
Extension Volunteer Research
• Extension Professionals with 4-H Youth
Development responsibility spend
approximately 50% of their time engaged in
volunteer development activity.
Volunteer Development Model
• ISOTURE
Volunteer Development Goals
• Provide a safe learning environment
for youth.
• Assure volunteers have the skills for
the position they are seeking.
• Decrease volunteer dropout rate.
• Increase volunteer satisfaction in
accomplishing program goals.
Volunteer Development Goals
• Ascertain the volunteers' attitudes and
motivations for involvement.
• Improve communications.
• Assess the training needs
• Make the best "fit" between the
volunteer and the program.
• Improve the quality of the educational
experience for children.
Identification
• Explore the need for volunteers in a
program - who, what, where, why,
when?
• What will be their responsibilities?
• What are the necessary qualifications,
skills and attitudes?
• How long will the position be needed?
Identification Tools
• Position description
• Position announcement
• Plan of work
• Advisory committee
• Program plans/needs
Volunteerism & Diverse Communities
Value of Recruiting Volunteers from Diverse Communities
• Youth and their families tend to join groups that
engage volunteers that are like them.
• Diverse volunteer base contributes to a richer
organization in ideas and practices.
• Participants in an organization deserve the
opportunity to work with all cultures and groups in
their community.
• A program that is able to be fluid and responsive to
the evolving needs of the people in a community will
prosper for many years.
Challenges of Recruiting
• Limited knowledge of diverse cultural
norms and values.
• Current organization norms and policies
are at odds with community needs.
• Existing staff may lack the skills to reach
out and work with new audiences.
• Limited knowledge or experience with the
organization in the community.
Ways to Connect with Diverse Communities
• Participate in the local community to learn
about the people in the community and for
them to know you.
• Make personal contacts.
• Partner with existing organizations in the
community.
• Be patient and take the time up front to learn
about the community from which you want to
recruit volunteers.
Building Relationships & Trust in a Community
• Spend time up front learning about the
community and its members.
• Become involved with the community.
• Enlist the support of those who are already a
part of the fabric of the community.
• Choose the right outreach staff for that
community.
• Demonstrate respect and patience in all you
do.
Generational Cohorts
• What is a generational cohort?
– A group of people programmed at similar time
– Common forces that affected millions at once
– Affected by:
• Media messages
• School systems (unique set of values)
• Parenting patterns (unique to the
generation shape and mold children)
Generational Cohorts
• Greatest Generation (GG): 1925-1942
• Baby Boomer (BB): 1943 – 1960
• Generation X (X): 1961-1981
• Millennial (M): 1982 – 200?
Source: Strauss, W., & Howe, N., The Fourth Turning: An American
Prophecy.
Greatest Generation
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Job strength: Stable
Outlook: Practical
Work Ethic: Dedicated
View of Authority: Respectful
Leadership: by Hierarchy
Relationships: Personal Sacrifice
Turnoffs: Vulgarity
Diversity: Ethnically Segregated
Feedback: No news is good news
Work/Life Balance: Need help shifting
Source: Raines - Connecting Generations: The Source book for a new
workplace
Greatest Generation
• MARKETING:
– Messages speak to family, home,
patriotism, & traditional values
– Age & experience – viewed as assets not
liabilities
• TRAINING:
– Take your time
– Share expectations, policies, who’s who
– Share history
• RECOGNITION:
– Personal touch
– Traditional awards
Generational Funnies…
Baby Boomers
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Job strength: Service Oriented/Team Players
Outlook: Optimistic
Work Ethic: Driven
View of Authority: Love/Hate
Leadership: by Consensus
Relationships: Personal Gratification
Turnoffs: Political Incorrectness
Diversity: Integration Began
Feedback: Once a year with documentation
Work/Life Balance: Work as priority, wanted it
“all”
Source: Raines - Connecting Generations: The Source book for a new
workplace
Baby Boomers
• MARKETING:
– Need to know their experience will be valued
– Want to “make a difference”
– Want warm, humane place to volunteer
• TRAINING:
– Want to volunteer for a worthy cause
– They want to solve problems & turn things
around
– Boomers may have an “I know all that” chip on
their shoulder.
• RECOGNITION
– Personal approach
– Show how much they are needed
– Like perks & public recognition
Generational Funnies…
GenXers
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Job strength: Adaptable & Techno-literate
Outlook: Skeptical
Work Ethic: Balanced
View of Authority: Unimpressed and
unintimidated
Leadership: by Competence
Relationships: Reluctant to Commit
Turnoffs: Cliché’/Hype
Diversity: Fully Integrated
Feedback: Interrupts and asks how they are
doing
Work/Life Balance: Wants balance NOW!
Source: Raines - Connecting Generations: The Source book for a new
workplace
GenXers
• MARKETING:
– Need balance – don’t want this to be “their life”
– Need fun, informal and relaxed environment
– Like hands-off supervision
• TRAINING:
– Time for questions
– Give them lists of who to call for what
– FAQ’s list
– Use deadlines, lists, graphics, bullets
– Value continuing education
• RECOGNITION
– $$$, Useful items
– Could take or leave Public Recognition
Generational Funnies…
Millennial
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Job strength: Multi-taskers and techno-savvy
Outlook: hopeful
Work Ethic: determined
View of Authority: polite
Leadership: by Pulling Together
Relationships: Inclusive
Turnoffs: Promiscuity
Diversity: No Majority Race
Feedback: Wants feedback at the push of a
button
• Work/Life Balance: Needs flexibility to
balance activities
Source: Raines - Connecting Generations: The Source book for a new
workplace
Millennial:
• MARKETING:
– Meet their own personal goals
– Create clear picture of volunteer environment
– Continuous training & skill development
– Civic minded
– Mentor programs
• TRAINING:
– Clear expectations, but not rigid
– Use current technology
– Offer new skill development
• RECOGNITION:
– Frequent, positive feedback
– Creative TY’s (e.g., e-mail, notes, My Space)
Generational Funnies
Is Your Program Ready? Things to Consider
• Are you able to build long term
relationships with the community?
• Are you able to collaborate with
those necessary to get the job done?
• Is your organization designed to be a
partner?
Volunteer Selection
• How do you make the best match
between the position you have
available and the knowledge,
attitudes, skills and abilities of
the potential volunteer?
Selection Tools
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Volunteer Marketing Resources
Application form
Reference forms - mail/telephone
Volunteer interview
Screening and Background checks
Observation
Your gut . . .
Aware
Prefer
Commit
Involve
Volunteer
Personal Contact
Targeted Media
Mass Media
Marketing Tools
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News Releases
Radio/TV PSA
Posters
Brochures
Word of Mouth
Social Networks
Podcasts
Buzz Marketing
Websites: Craigslist, Volunteer groups,
YouTube
Volunteer Marketing Plan
• Develop a plan for marketing the 4-H
volunteer experience in your county/area
• Consider what currently exists and what in
addition is required to address the interests
and needs of youth
• Set priorities and targets
• Recruit leaders and form new clubs/groups
• Provide orientation and support
• Mainstream into on-going activities & events
Volunteer Selection:
Finding Clarity in a Cloudy Sea
What do you see?
Sometimes it’s what you don’t know
that can hurt you . . .
Volunteer Selection – The Complete Picture
• What do we see?
• What do we need to see but
can’t?
Organizational Chaos
Moving in the
same direction?
Organizational Order
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The “Right” Selection is not just a fluke!
Assessing Triggers
• The Setting
• The Contact
• What’s Special?
– Communications
– Age
– Ability
– Location
TRAINING
• 4,982 adult volunteers and 2,126
youth volunteers were reported as
participating in training conducted at
the county and state levels; 978
other adults (4-H professionals,
non-volunteers, or adults from other
organizations) were trained through
4-H programs in Washington State.
Tools and Resources to Support 4-H Volunteer Development
• The following links are designed to connect you with
the most up to date and relevant information about 4-H
volunteer development.
• WA state 4-H deems these three resources as critical
information for all 4-H staff and volunteers to know. In
fact, WA 4-H Program Policy states that the following
information meets the minimum training requirements
for new 4-H volunteers.
• Please become familiar with each resource and be
sure to educate your volunteers using them as your
guide during their first year of service.
http://4h.wsu.edu/volntr/register.htm
• (Basic Volunteer Training) – This is an
interactive tool to provide essential
information for learning about 4-H. This
program provides introductory training for
staff and volunteers.
Many counties use this as the first part of
their training program. If you have
questions about accessing the E-learning
training, please contact Tiffany Boswell at
[email protected]
http://4h.wsu.edu/staff/vm/index.htm
• This guide provides an overview of all aspects of 4H, clarify roles of all involved in 4-H, emphasizes
the policies and laws to which 4-H is obligated and
helps you become effective as a leader of
youth. These units have been designed for staff to
provide volunteers with the tools to be
successful. Thank you for joining our 4-H family!
• These training units provide an overview of 4-H,
clarify roles of all involved in 4-H, emphasize the
policies and laws to which 4-H is obligated. If you
have questions, concerns or ideas about using the
Staff Guide for Volunteer Training, please contact
Ann Hennings at [email protected]
Washington State 4-H Youth Development Program Policy
• Minimum guidelines and policies for staff
and volunteers as established through
Washington State University
Extension. This document is a vital
resource to lead the county professional in
delivering 4-H programming. If you have
questions about these guideline and
policies, please contact Pat BoyEs, State
4-H Program Director, at
[email protected]
Volunteer Utilization
• How do you effectively utilize the
people who want to volunteer?
Carolyn
Dale
Linda
Steve
• Volunteers need to make complaints
face-to-face
• Not your problem, theirs
• You are the model of good
communication, you model techniques
• Keep the conflict confidential and have
them do the same
• Listen for conflict causing behavior:
jabs, put-downs, body language,
things that cause division
• ASK questions. Even if you think you
know what they are saying, ask openended questions
• Know your conflict style and make
necessary adjustments
• 3 Time Rule - if you’ve solved it and it
comes up again - you haven’t really
solved it
• Acknowledge feelings, body language,
tones and clarify what they mean
• Admit when you’re not modeling correct
style
Volunteer Recognition
• Honoring and recognizing individuals
for their unique contribution to
educational program efforts
Recognition Tools
• Understanding human motivation
– altruism
– affiliation
– achievement
– power
Evaluation
Measuring Performance to Meet
Expectations
Evaluation: What is it?
• Systematic collection of information
– Volunteer performance
– Overall program
– Impacts
• Based on a plan
• Ongoing process
Why Measure Performance?
• Answers the question, “How am I
doing?”
• “Customer” Satisfaction
• Identifies what’s working / not working
• Provides feedback
• Outcomes focus
• Validates volunteer program
Methods of Data Collection
• Face to Face
– Individual
– Group
• Survey
– Telephone
– Mail
– Internet
• Direct Observation
– Competency based
• Self Assessment
– On-line
– Paper
Who Can Evaluate
• Professionals or staff
• Volunteers
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Middle managers
Organizational/unit volunteer
Project volunteers
Self- evaluation by volunteer
• Members
• Other stakeholders
– Parents
– Community partners
Planning Process
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Decide purpose of the evaluation
Determine the audience
Write an outcome objective
Select method of evaluation
Develop questions
Sample test the survey
Adjust evaluation tool
Complete the evaluation
Keep in Mind
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Plan of Work
Position Description
Performance
Feedback from others
Personal Observation
Formal and informal evaluation
Remember. . .
• Were the expectations of the position
clear?
• How well did the individual accomplish
the goals and objectives established
for the position?
• What are the options you have with
the volunteer?
Evaluation Implications
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Continue in position
Continue in another position
Continue with “qualifiers”
Discontinue volunteer service
Volunteer Development:
Your Best Bet for Success!
Thanks to:
Carolyn Ashton, Oregon State University
Dale Leidheiser, Univ. of California Cooperative Extension
Linda Schultz, New Mexico State University
And Steve Dasher, Colorado State University
Whose full presentations may be found at
http://www.4h.wsu.edu/institute/voldev.html

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