Sylvia Solis A IV - Santa Clara County Office of Education

Report
New English Language Development
and Common Core State Standards
Institute
From Silence to Meaningful and
Productive Conversations for the
Common Core Demands
June 27, 2013
Introductions
Sylvia Solís
A Look at Learning Project Specialist
Santa Clara County Office of Education
2
Goal
Prepare every English learner for
college and career success!
3
Objectives
Participants will...
 Understand the language demands of the
Common Core State Standards
 Understand key shifts in the ELD standards
 Engage in strategies to produce meaningful
and productive conversations.
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Language Demands from the
Common Core State Standards
The Common Core State Standards set high
expectations for all students to participate in
academic discourse across the disciplines.
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Student Expectations
• To sustain dialogue on a range of topics and in a
variety of content areas
• Interpret the meaning of informational and literary
texts
• Explain their thinking and build on others ideas
• Construct arguments and justify their position
persuasively with sound evidence
• Effectively produce written and oral texts in a variety
of disciplines for a variety of audiences and purposes
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CA ELD Standards: Design
• Aligned with and to be used in tandem with CCSS for
•
•
ELA & Literacy and applied to both ELD and content
area instruction
Highlight and amplify the critical language,
knowledge about language, and skills using
language in the CCSS in order for ELs to be
simultaneously successful in school while they are
developing language
Provide fewer, clearer, higher standards so teachers
can focus on what’s most important
Overview of the California English Language Development Standards and Proficiency Level Descriptors, p 14.
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Key Shifts
1999 CA ELD Standards
From…
2012 CA ELD Standards
To…
ELD Standards as
ELD Standards working in
“junior” ELA
tandem with ELA and other
Standards or as  content standards and seen
an “onramp” to
as the “diamond lane” for
the ELA
acceleration
Standards
Spycher, 2012
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ELD
Standards
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Key Shifts
1999 CA ELD Standards
From…
Simplified texts
and activities,
often separate
from content
knowledge
2012 CA ELD Standards
To…
Complex texts and
 intellectually challenging
activities with content
integral to language learning
Spycher, 2012
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Key Shifts
Sentence to unpack:
Although many countries are
addressing pollution, environmental
degradation continues to create
devastating human health problems
each year.
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Key Shifts
Meaning:
 Pollution is a big problem around the
world.
 Many countries are doing something
about pollution.
 Pollution destroys the environment.
 The health problems are really serious.
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Key Shifts
1999 CA ELD Standards
From…
2012 CA ELD Standards
To…
Instruction that
Instruction that artfully
treats reading,
integrates reading, writing,
writing, listening,  speaking and listening, and
and speaking as
language
isolated and
separate skills
Spycher, 2012
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Key Shifts
1999 CA ELD Standards
From…
Listening and
Speaking
Reading
Writing
2012 CA ELD Standards
To…

Part I: Interacting in
Meaningful Ways
Part II: Learning About
How
English Works
Part III: Using
Foundational
Literacy Skills
Spycher, 2012
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New CCSS Paradigm:
language is central to all academic areas
SCIENCE
History
Social
Studies
MATH
*•
LANGUAGE
ARTS
Olsen, 2013
instructional
discourse
• expressing and
understanding
reasoning
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What do the shifts in the ELD
Standards mean for me?
•
•
•
ELD Standards working in tandem with ELA and other content
standards and seen as the “diamond lane” for acceleration
Complex texts and intellectually challenging activities with
content integral to language learning
Instruction that artfully integrates reading, writing, speaking
and listening, and language
Select a shift and explain its possible
implication/consequence on your work
I selected …
I think an implication/consequence on my work will be...
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ELD Lesson
Grades 6-8 Intermediate Level
Total Number of ELs: 25
6 Early Intermediate
15 Intermediate
4 Early Advanced
Length of Lesson: Two periods of 60
minutes for three days
Topic: Oral presentation based on The
Circuit by Francisco Jimenez
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CCSS ELA Standard
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Grade 6: SL. 4 Present claims and findings
a. Plan and deliver an informative/explanatory
presentation that: develops a topic with
relevant facts, definitions, and concrete
details; uses appropriate transition to clarify
relationships; uses precise language and
domain specific vocabulary; and provides a
strong conclusion.
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ELD Lesson:
Through the Lens of the CCSS
Watch the video and record
evidence that demonstrates
alignment to CCSS and 21st century
skills on the note-taking guide.
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Through the Lens of the CCSS
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A Comprehensive System for Increasing English Learners’ Academic Achievement
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What is A.L.L.?
A.L.L. is a multi-year comprehensive system
designed to build instructional leadership and
teacher efficacy to apply research-based
practices in classrooms that lead to increased
language proficiency and academic
achievement for English learners.
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A Look at Learning Cycle
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Planning to Plan!
“Plans are nothing;
Planning is everything.”
Dwight D. Eisenhower
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Going Deeper with
Planned Language Production
• Everyone speaking with support
• Everyone is accountable
Teacher-Whole Class
Small Group
Partners
Individual
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Examples of Non-Accountable
Responses
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Who knows what _______ means?
Can anyone tell me_______?
Who has an example of ______?
Would anyone like to share?
Share your answer with your neighbor.
Discuss these questions in your group.
Anytime we “call on someone” (with or
without sticks)
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Frames vs. Stems
1. Why do we need them?
2. What is the difference?
• Sentence frames TEACH language
• Sentence stems or starters elicit student
thinking
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Unstructured Prompt without a
Frame or Starter
Prompt: How does your best friend get to school?
Students do not ask each other the prompt. They just answer the question.
Answers:
• She take the bus.
• He walking to the school.
• He ride his bike.
• She drived with her mom.
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Sentence Starters…
 Provide little structure for accurate asking or
response
 Leave it to students to figure out how to construct
the sentence
 Often result in erroneous language use.
Non-example:
Prompt: How does your best friend get to school?
Starter: My best friend____________________.
walking at the school
walks to the school
walked to school
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Sentence Response Frames
with a word bank and structured partners
A: How does your best friend get to school?
B: My best friend ______s to school.
Verb Bank: (present tense +s)
walks
rides her bike
gets a ride
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Sentence Response Frames
with prompt, frame, and parts of speech
A. How does your friend get to school?
B. My friend verb to school adverb.
Verbs
walks
rides her bike
takes the bus
gets a ride
Adverbs
frequently
sometimes
often
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Stem & Frame Resources
• Look over the stem and frame resources in
your packet.
• Note how they are different.
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Quick Quiz: Frame or Stem?
1. I discovered…
2. The differences between _____________ and
____________ are____________( with prompt and word
bank)
3. The writer mentions _______________________ and
illustrates the point by emphasizing that
____________________________ (used after
brainstorming).
4. I agree with _______’s idea and I’d like to add
__________.
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The key is to make an intentional
instructional decision…
• Am I trying to start discussion?
• Am I trying to teach language? If so, what
kind of language?
• Would a sentence frame stifle creativity?
• Would a sentence stem be too open?
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PLP During the Opening &
Presentation
How can we include Planned Language Production
opportunities while using the following strategies in a
lesson:





Choral Response
Echo Repeat
Turn to a partner
Hand motions
White boards or writing
 I could use the _______ PLP strategy in my classroom
when ___________________.
 I would adapt the ______ PLP Strategy by
___________________
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The “How” of the PLP: Choosing
a Language Production Routine
• Once you have your frame or your stem, you
must determine how students will practice…
• Small Group
• Student to Student
• Student to Teacher
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Strategies in Action
Think about examples observed in the video of
Planned Language Production opportunities or
the use of sentence stems or sentence
frames…
 An example of ________ was…
 Another example of ____ was…
 I’d like to add another example…
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Language is a Vehicle to
Understand Content
“Learning subject matter and work skills
involves using language to structure
understanding and core knowledge, to
connect concepts with other
understanding, and to practice multiple
literacy skills within meaningful content-rich
activities.”
Alliance for Excellent Education, 2012
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CCSS alone do not provide a
pathway towards English
proficiency for ELs
• New English Language Development
standards aligned to the CCSS
(adopted November 2012)
• Implementation of CCSS must be
accompanied by full implementation of
the new ELD standards
Olsen, 2013
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Register
“The type of language we use in
particular situations when
communicating with a particular set
of people to meet the expectations
of a particular context”
Spycher, 2012
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Resources
A Look at Learning
http://mes.sccoe.org/all/Pages/default.aspx
California English Language Development Standards
http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/el/er/eldstandards.asp
eStandards App
http://scoecurriculum.net/estandards/support/
Resources from Dr. Kate Kinsella
http://mes.sccoe.org/ell/Pages/Kinsella-AcademicDiscourse.aspx
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