Terri Wegener DWR - What`s next in California`s flood future?

Report
What’s next in California's flood future?
Finding answers:
California Water Management Investment Strategy
FEMA Region IX - CHARG Stakeholder Meeting
July 24, 2014
California is at Risk
• Today…….. Drought
• Tomorrow………a Flood
2
California Is Diverse
• Population of over 38 million
• Different Terrains and Habitat
–
–
–
–
Coastal to Desert
Mountains to inland Valleys
Large Urban areas of LA and SF
Significant Agriculture in Central Valley
• 10 California Hydrologic Regions
• Need to Plan for Weather Extremes
– Droughts of 1976-77, 1987-92, 2007-09
– Floods: 1986, 1997, 2005
3
No One
Size Fits
All
Solutions
California’s Flood Future:
Recommendations for Managing the State’s Flood Risk
Released November 2013
• Information received from more
140 public agencies
• First comprehensive look at
flood risk
than
at statewide statewide
• Joint DWR/USACE Publication
• Policy and Investment Recommendations to reduce risk and
consequences of flooding
4
This information doesn’t surprise you, but it sure
surprised some folks…
• 1 in 5 Californians are
exposed to flood risk
• $580B in assets are
exposed to flooding
• All 58 counties are at risk
for major flooding
• More than 100 sensitive
species
5
Today’s Flood Management Challenges
Major system deficiencies put public safety,
financial stability and economic well being of the
state at risk of flooding.
O&M of flood management systems is difficult due to
permit challenges and insufficient financing.
Aging infrastructure and growing population put more
pressure on flood management systems.
Complex network of over 1,300 agencies are
responsible for flood management. These agencies
often have conflicting or overlapping responsibilities
Climate change impacts, including less snowpack, higher
flood peaks, and sea level rise, create new uncertainties.
6
The
economic
climate has
changed
Sufficient and stable investment in flood
management must become a public policy priority
Currently identified projects estimated capital investment
Estimated additional
capital investment
needed for flood
management projects
Capital investment in
California Flood
management projects in
the last decade
7
$11B
More
than
$100B
More
than
$50B
Recommendations
Conduct regional flood risk assessments to
understand statewide flood risk.
Increase public and policymaker awareness about
flood risks to facilitate informed decisions
Increase support for flood emergency
preparedness, response, and recovery programs
to reduce flood impacts.
Encourage land use planning practices that
reduce the consequences of flooding.
8
Recommendations
Implement flood management from regional,
systemwide, and statewide perspectives to
provide multiple benefits.
Increase collaboration among public agencies to
improve flood management planning, policies,
and investments.
Establish sufficient and stable funding
mechanisms to reduce flood risk.
9
Which brings us to the
California Water Management Investment Strategy
California’s flood management expenditures are
significantly lower than expenditures for water
supply and wastewater treatment
Annual expenditures ($ billions)
30
20
Water
Supply
10
Wastewater
0
11
Flood
Management
SOURCE: Water and
the California
Economy –
Technical Appendix
PPIC, 2012
This just in:
Funding is insufficient and unreliable.
• Declining local and state resources, reduced
Federal cost shares
• Challenging revenue structure
• Necessary projects and regular
O&M are deferred indefinitely.
• The cost of flood management is misunderstood by
public and policy makers
12
Governance and Finance
13
California Water Management Investment Strategy
• Describe the State’s investment
priorities for all aspects of water
management, and offer guidance on
how to organize and pay for the work
needed to address those priorities.
• Align with CA Water Action Plan
14
Answering the important questions
• How much money is needed?
• What are the State’s investment priorities?
• What are the financing options?
• How do we achieve sustainable funding?
• How do we improve Agency Alignment and permitting
inefficiencies?
15
Robust Information-Gathering Process
 Will build on information
collected from agencies
responsible for water
management. Examples:
•
•
•
•
•
16
Water supply
Water treatment
Flood management
Ecosystem management
Stormwater management
Types of local agency information
17
•
Planned projects and necessary maintenance
•
Cost estimates for flood, water and ecosystem
management – now and in the future
•
How funding challenges been solved in the past?
•
How do you plan to address funding challenges in the
future?
•
What else do you want policy leaders to know?
Value associated with Water Management
• Public Safety
• Environmental Stewardship
• Economic Stability
• Other Enriching Experiences
18
California Water Mgmt Investment Strategy
1. Highlights
2. California Water Management
Investment Strategy Report
3. Appendices
• Context and Framework
• Information Gathering and Mgmt Actions
• Agency Alignment and Permitting
• Risk Management
• Finance Mechanisms
• Recommendations
19
For more information:
Terri Wegener: [email protected]
California’s
Flood
Jason Sidley: [email protected]
Future Report
http://www.water.ca.gov/SFMP
Recommendations for
Managing the States Flood Risk
August 2012

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