Highly Engaged by School

Report
Teacher Engagement Survey
Results and Analysis
June 2011
Overview
Engagement is the sense of connection that individuals have with their profession in
general and with their current jobs in particular. The specific situation at individual
school sites impacts the teachers’ level of engagement. Aspects of the working
environment such as relationships with school administration, colleagues, students, and
parents; the physical working conditions; feelings of personal safety; policy
considerations and implementation; support for personal development and growth; prior
preparation; perceptions of personal relevance; and satisfaction all impact the level of
teachers’ engagement.
This study was conducted to accomplish three goals:
1. Measure the level of engagement among the teaching staff.
2. Identify which groups of staff are not engaged.
3. Identify areas to help improve engagement.
With this information we hope to improve conditions so that all teachers are fully
engaged in their profession. Fully engaged teachers is a key to helping all students
achieve at their full potential.
Study Design
All members of the teaching staff were invited to complete the engagement survey.
The survey was completed online using the K12 Insight platform. The survey
consisted of four parts:
Engagement Scale was comprised of eight items that were specifically
designed to measure each teacher’s level of engagement. On the basis of
responses to these items, an “Engagement Score” was computed for each
respondent.
School/Workplace items assessed 23 areas that are related to engagement.
Each of the 23 areas were measured by two questions that were combined to
yield a score for each area.
General Satisfaction was assessed independently by two items.
Respondent Background items included school site, grade levels taught, and
subject areas taught.
Technical Notes
This study was designed as a census survey. That is, all teachers were invited and
encouraged to participate. The census approach is desirable because:


From an engagement/outreach perspective, it provides opportunities for all constituents
to voice their views.
From a statistical perspective, it eliminates sampling error because everyone is included.
An alternative to a census study is a random sample study. The random sample involves
inviting a fraction of the population to complete the survey. The random sample approach
requires that:



Individuals are selected to participate in a manner that is not systematically related to the
variable being studied (unbiased).
A sufficient number of individuals are invited and respond to the invitation to achieve a
desired level of precision (margin of error).
The resulting sample should reflect (be representative of) the characteristics of the
population from which it was drawn.
When a population is large, perceptions held by the population as a whole can be statistically
estimated from a small fraction of individuals from that population. However, when the
population is small, (i.e., <1,000), as much as one-half of the population must be sampled to
gain a valid estimate of the views held by the overall group. In either case, individuals must
be selected at random to ensure they accurately represent the larger population.
Who Responded to the Survey?
Of the 420 teachers in the district, 272 completed the survey to provide an overall
response rate of 65%. This response rate is of sufficient size statistically to generalize to
all district teachers.
However, the teachers who responded to the survey chose to complete it. It is the
engaged teachers who usually choose to participate. Therefore, the non-responding
teachers are also likely not engaged. The responses to the survey questions may not
reflect the views of all teachers.
The responses provided by the engaged teachers provide valuable information about how
engagement might be improved for all teachers.
Completed Surveys
272
Response Rate = 65%
Total Teachers
420
0
50
100
150
200 250
Count
300
350
400
450
Who Responded to the Survey?
The number of participants varied considerably across schools, with most
respondents at the High (n=90; 33%) and Junior High School (n=71; 26%).
Number of Respondents by School
Forest Avenue School
28
Tooker Avenue School
21
Santapogue School
12
JF Kennedy School
31
South Bay School
17
West Babylon Junior High School
71
West Babylon High School
90
Other
2
0
20
40
60
Count
80
100
Who Responded to the Survey?
Respondents represented all grade levels and subject areas.
Grade Levels Taught
PK
Subject Areas Taught
1
KG
26
1st
23
2nd
24
4th
31
5th
31
6th
27
7th
28
8th
Electives
5
15
Physical Education-Health
10th
11th
55
40
World Languages
9
Other
50
40
37
Social Studies
57
12th
23
Science
49
Count
38
Music
9th
20
49
Mathematics
36
0
6
English-Language Arts
27
3rd
Art
60
47
0
10
20
30 40
Count
50
60
What is the Overall Level of Engagement?
The eight engagement scale items were rated on a five-point scale from strongly
disagree to strongly agree. Average ratings are displayed. Because more engaged
individuals likely completed the survey, these data may overestimate engagement
among teachers districtwide.
Teaching gives me a feeling of accomplishment.
4.76
Overall, I am satisfied with teaching.
4.60
My current teaching duties are interesting.
4.53
I am proud to work at my school.
4.50
I am not planning on leaving my school.
4.50
I am motivated to contribute more than what is
expected of me at this school.
4.42
I would feel comfortable referring a good friend to
teach at my school.
4.24
Overall, I enjoy working for this school's principal.
4.00
3.00
3.50
4.00
Rating
4.50
5.00
What is the Overall Level of Engagement?
Ratings on the eight items comprising the engagement scale were averaged to
provide an engagement score for each respondent. The median engagement score
was 4.8 (average was 4.4) and ranged from 2.2 to 5.0. Scores were classified
according to three levels: Not Engaged (less than 3.5), Engaged (3.5 to 4.5), and
Highly Engaged (4.5 to 5.0). Most respondents were either Highly Engaged or
Engaged. Just 7% (n = 20) of respondents registered as Not Engaged.
Engagement Score
Descriptions
Median
4.8
Minimum
2.2
Highly Engaged
61%
Engaged
32%
Not Engaged
Maximum
7%
5.0
0%
20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
Percent
Which Groups of Teachers are Engaged?
The percent of teachers identified as “highly engaged” at each school is represented.
Engagement tended to be lowest at the junior high school (45%) and high school
(63%) and higher at the elementary schools (ranging from 61% to 77%).
Highly Engaged by School
Forest Avenue School
61%
Tooker Avenue School
71%
Santapogue School
67%
JF Kennedy School
77%
South Bay School
West Babylon Junior High School
West Babylon High School
71%
45%
63%
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
Percent
Which Groups of Teachers are Engaged?
About two-thirds of the teachers in the core subject areas of English-language arts,
mathematics, and science registered as Highly Engaged. All 6 of the responding art
teachers indicated that they are Highly Engaged.
Highly Engaged by Subject Taught
Art
100%
Electives
60%
English-Language Arts
61%
Mathematics
68%
Music
73%
Physical Education-Health
74%
Science
65%
Social Studies
78%
World Languages
78%
Other
66%
0%
20%
40%
60%
Percent
80%
100%
Satisfaction and Engagement
Engaged or Highly Engaged teachers were more likely to be satisfied with teaching
than were the Not Engaged teachers. Most (89%) of the Highly Engaged teachers
said they have never considered leaving their school, compared to half of the
engaged teachers and 11% of the Not Engaged teachers.
17%
Satisfied or Very Satisfied
teaching at school.
92%
99%
Not Engaged
Engaged
11%
Have never considered leaving
school.
Highly Engaged
50%
89%
0%
20%
40% 60%
Percent
80% 100%
Where Should Efforts be Focused to Improve
Teacher Engagement?
Twenty-three aspects of the school/workplace environment were examined to find
areas of focus to help improve engagement among teachers. Each area was rated
on a five-point scale, with higher values indicating greater satisfaction with that area.
The relationship between each teacher’s ratings and their overall engagement score
was also examined. To do this, correlation coefficients were computed between the
engagement scores and each school/workplace item. A correlation coefficient is a
measure of how strongly two items are related to each other. The value can range
from -1.0 to 0 to +1.0. The closer to ±1.0, the stronger the relationship.
Based on the combination of ratings and correlation with engagement, the areas
were classified as high vs. low in ratings and high vs. low in relation to engagement
(see table below). Those areas that were rated low, but had a strong correlation with
engagement (red) should receive primary focus. The secondary areas are those that
had high ratings and a strong correlation with engagement (yellow).
Rating
Low
High
Relation to Engagement
High
Low
PRIMARY FOCUS
SECONDARY FOCUS
Where Should Efforts be Focused to Improve
Teacher Engagement?
Relation to Engagement
High
Low
Low
PRIMARY FOCUS
These areas are highly related Improvement in these areas
to Engagement, but were rated may help with the overall
low.
work environment, but would
These items offer best
have little impact on
opportunity for improving
engagement.
engagement.
High
SECONDARY FOCUS
These areas are highly related
to Engagement, and were rated District is performing well in
favorably.
these areas.
Emphasis on these items may
help improve engagement
among some teachers.
Rating
Where Should Efforts be Focused to Improve Teacher Engagement?
Relation to Engagement
High
Low
Low
PRIMARY FOCUS
Rating
High SECONDARY FOCUS
The administrators and staff share my values.
The principal tries new ideas.
I enjoy working with the school administrators.
The policies help me to do my job.
The administrators do a good job and make good decisions.
I feel recognized and appreciated for my work.
I am satisfied with opportunities for career advancement.
Staff from different backgrounds are valued at school.
The administrators are truthful and do what they say.
I understand what the principal expects of me.
The administrators are truthful and do what they say.
I have the support and authority to make decisions.
I am supported when addressing problems with students.
I have the time and resources to do my job.
I am safe and comfortable at school.
I am proud of the teaching quality at school.
Meeting student's needs is a top priority at this school.
My subject matter is interesting.
I understand how my teaching affects the school and students.
I am a positive influence on my students.
I have the necessary training to teach at this school.
I am satisfied with the pay and benefits.
I enjoy working with my colleagues.
Rating
3.78
3.71
3.55
3.76
3.52
3.56
3.86
3.90
3.41
4.09
4.41
4.19
3.58
3.53
3.88
4.40
4.35
4.58
4.62
4.80
4.29
4.12
4.53
Relation to
Engagement
0.65
0.64
0.63
0.59
0.58
0.58
0.54
0.54
0.53
0.59
0.57
0.53
0.43
0.29
0.22
0.50
0.46
0.45
0.41
0.34
0.34
0.24
0.24
Written Feedback
Teachers were provided an opportunity to give written feedback. 94 (35%) of
the participants answered the question. Written feedback differed by school
site, with comments often being specific to issues at their school location.
Some common themes included:

Sentiments expressed that administration holds different views/priorities
than teachers; divide between teachers and administration.

Expressed feelings of collegiality among teaching staff, but distance from
administration.

Expressions of both positive and negative views of their principals/school
site administration.

More consistent support is needed from administration on student
behavior and discipline.

Concerns about budget cuts.

Concerns about the condition of the facilities, availability of materials.
Summary
The major findings from this engagement study revealed:

Teachers showed a moderate response to the survey with 65% responding. The 35% who
did not respond likely includes a high proportion of non-engaged teachers. While the
feedback may not reflect the views of all teachers, it does provide information as to how
engagement might be improved.

The participating teachers revealed high levels of engagement with a median score of 4.8
on a 5.0 scale.
o 61% were identified as “highly engaged”
o 32% as “engaged”
o 7% as “not engaged”

Overall engagement tended to be lower among teachers at the junior high and high
schools and higher at the elementary schools.

About two-thirds of the teachers in the core subject areas registered as “highly engaged.”

Primary opportunities for improving engagement include improving relationships
between teachers and administrators, ensuring policies promote the necessary support
for teachers to fulfill job functions, and increasing recognition for teacher’s work.

similar documents