types of microfluidic pump

Report
MICROFLUIDIC PUMPS
TO BE
PRESENTED
BY
UMAR ABDULLAHI ABDULHAMEED
500612013
MAY,2013
OUTLINE
 Introduction
 Motivation






Why microfluidic pumps?
Definitions
Types
Applications
Challenges
References
INTRODUCTION
 A microfluidic devices was once only used in
the domain of inkjet printers and similarly-styled
office equipment. Flash forward to today and
you will see a microfluidic devices are employed
in:
 Biotechnology
 pharmaceutical
 life
science etc.
 Microfluidic pumps are capable of achieving
single digit pL per minute flow rate.
MOTIVATION
 The manipulation of fluid in channels with
dimensions of tens of micrometers-microfluidic
pumping-has emerged as a distinct new field.
Microfluidics has a potential to influence subject
areas from chemical synthesis and biological
analysis to optics and information technology. But
the field is still at an early stage of development.
 To achieve these manipulations, the use of pump is
earnestly needed in order to achieve miniaturization.
Why microfluidic pumps?
 Mechanical pumps are not the best solution to
overcome the viscous resistance of fluid flow in
micro channels.
 Large external pumps defies miniaturization
 To allow implantation
DEFINATIONS
Microfluidics
 Microfluidics deals with the behavior, precise
control and manipulation of fluids that are
geometrically constrained to a small volume
typically microlitre,nanolitre picolitreor femtolitre.
 Microfluidic is a science that deals with the flow of
fluid in a channel of micrometer size.
What are microfluidic pumps?
Microfluidic pumps are devices that are used to
pump or mix fluid in channels of micrometer size
in a microfluidic system.
BERNOULLI’S THEOREM
 The Bernoulli equation is a special statement of
the general energy equation
 Work added to the system is referred to as pump
head (hP)
 Losses from the system are referred to as head
loss (hL)
 Pressure (lbf/in2) is a form of work
 Strictly Mechanical Energy so we get the
equation:
P1 + PE1 + KE1 + WK = PE2 + KE2 + WKFRIC + P2
BERNOULLI’S Equation
Z1 + (P1/) + (V12/2g) = Z2 + (P2/) + (V22/2g) + hP - hL
Z : Elevation (ft)
P : Pressure (lb/ft2)
 : Density (lb/ft3)
V : Velocity (ft/sec)
g : acceleration
(32.2 ft/sec2)
Z : Elevation (ft)
P : Pressure (lb/ft2)
 : Density (lb/ft3)
V : Velocity (ft/sec)
g : acceleration
(32.2 ft/sec2)
Fluidic Design Equations – Bernoulli Again
Piezoelectric microfluidic pumps
Various Piezoelectric Pumps
TYPES OF MICROFLUIDIC PUMP
Different microfluidic pumps can be implement using:
Piezoelectric
Electrostatic effect
Thermo-pneumatic effect
Magnetic effect
Electrochemical
Ultrasonic flow generation
Electro-osmotic
Electohydrodynamics principle
Types of microfluidic pumps
 Microfluidic pump based on travelling wave
 Thermal gradient
 Catalytic
 Surface tension
 Optically actuated pumps
 Self-propelling semiconductor diode
Finger-powered pump
Finger –powered pump
FABRICATION OF THE DEVICE
ELECTRO-OSMOIC PUMP
 The electro osmotic flow is generated in the
pump by applying a low voltage across the two
electrodes.
 This may be implemented using a battery or dc
power supply unit.
 For advance flow rate control a PWM power
source can be supplied.
 Provide excellent pumping performance in a
miniature package.
 It also provide smooth flow
ELECTRO-OSMOIC PUMP
 Ideal for integration into a microfluidic systems to its reduced size
and precise control that can be achieved in the low flow range.
 The working liquid can be deionizer water but it is possible to pump
any liquid including aggressive media and cell suspension. Thus it
has application in life science .
 Advantages
 No pulsation
 No moving part
 Small size
 High power performance.
 Easy operation
APPLICATIONS
Biomedical
 Drug delivery
 Fluid mixing
 Particle manipulation
 Administering pharmaceutical products
 Lab –on-chip
 Implantation
 Heart blood pumping implantation
APPLICATIONS
 Life science

DNA analysis

Protein analysis

Forensic test

Lineage tracing

Separation of mammalian cell
CHALLENGES
 Difficult to fabricate due to complex structure
 Limitation to specific fluid
 cost
REFERENCES
[1] D. D. Carlo and L. P. Lee, “Dynamic Single-Cell Analysis for
2009.
[2] P. Yager, T. Edwards, E. Fu, K. Helton, K Nelson, M R. Tam,
Quantitative Biology”, Anal. Chem., Vol. 78, pp. 7918-7925,
and B. H. Weigl, “Microfluidic Diagnostic Technologies for
Global Public Health”, Nature, Vol. 442, pp. 412-418, 2006.
[3] G.-M. Walker and D. J. Beebe, “A Passive Pumping Method
for Microfluidic Devices”, Lab Chip, Vol. 2, pp. 131-134,
2002.
[4] I. Meyvantsson, J. W. Warrick, S. Hayes, A. Skoien, D. J.
Beebe, “Automated Cell Culture in High Density Tubeless
Microfluidic Device Arrays”, Lab Chip, Vol. 8, pp. 717-724,
2008.
[5] A. W. Martinez, S. T. Phillips, and G. M. Whiteside's,
“Three-Dimensional Microfluidic Devices Fabricated in Layered Paper and
Tape” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., Vol. 105, pp. 19606-19611, 2008.
THANKS FOR
YOUR
AUDIENCE

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