STAAR Alternate Participation Requirements

Report
ARD Decision-Making for
the STAAR Alternate
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
RETN Etiquette
Please turn OFF cell phones
If you must take a call,
please take it outside
Be sure your microphones are muted.
Remember…
You may be seen or heard by other
sites at any time, even if you are not
speaking to the presenter.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
2
Attendance and Handouts
Credit for Attendance
Access to Handouts
• Your district site manager
should provide you with a
sign-in sheet
• Please be sure that all
participants who want credit
for attendance sign-in
• Coordinate with the site
manager to return the signin sheet to ESC Region XI
• Handouts are available
online on the ESC Region
XI website at
http://www.esc11.net/
Page/3791
• Click on “STAAR Alternate
Training Resources” on
the left side menu
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
After today, this session will be
available for viewing via the VBrick
system at http://vbrick.esc11.net
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Questions???
Opportunities to ask
questions will be provided
throughout the training.
[email protected]
817-740-7574
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Objectives for this training
• Review current STAAR Assessments
• Understand requirements for participation
in STAAR Alternate assessments for 20122013
• Understand ARD committee
responsibilities regarding the STAAR
Alternate
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Let’s Review
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Student Assessment Division
• Assessment Resources
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/
• Resource pages
• STAAR
• STAAR Modified
• STAAR Alternate
• STAAR L
• TELPAS
• TAKS
• TAKS Modified
• Student Assessment
Resources
• A-Z Directory
• Subscribe to the
Student Assessment
Mailing List
• What’s New in Student
Assessment
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
8
STAAR Grades 3 – 8
Based on GRADE enrollment
Subjects/Grades
3
4
5
6
7
8
Reading
Mathematics
Writing
Science
Social Studies
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Includes modified and alternate assessments
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

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STAAR End-of-Course Assessments (EOC)
Based on COURSE enrollment
English
English I
English II
English III
Math
Algebra I
Geometry
Algebra II
Science
Social Studies
Biology
U.S.
History
Chemistry
World
History
Physics
World
Geography
Includes modified and alternate assessments
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Which test do students take?
Students in grades 3–8 and
students who entered grade 9 in 2011–2012 and thereafter
STAAR
For unique situations, contact TEA’s Student
Assessment Division
STAAR L
STAAR Spanish (Gr. 3-5)
ELL’s who meet participation requirements
STAAR Modified
Students with disabilities who meet
participation requirements for an alternate
assessment based on modified achievement
standards
Students in grades 3 and above with significant cognitive disabilities
STAAR Alternate
Must meet participation requirements for an
alternate assessment based on alternate
achievement standards
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
11
STAAR Assessments for ELLs
Receiving Special Education Services
• STAAR in English
• STAAR in Spanish
(grades 3-5)
• STAAR Modified
• STAAR Alternate
• STAAR L in English
The ARD-C and
LPAC must
collaborate on
assessment and
accommodations
decisions
12
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Questions?
13
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Who takes STAAR Alternate?
• Students receiving special education services who:
• Have a significant cognitive disability
•
•
•
•
Access TEKS through prerequisite skills
Require supports throughout the day for nonacademic tasks
Need specialized instruction in the natural environment
Are routinely assessed through performance tasks
• There are no limits on the number of students who
can take a STAAR Alternate assessment, however…
• Up to 1% of the tested population can be counted as
proficient for AYP when tested with STAAR Alternate.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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How does STAAR Alternate measure
the grade-level TEKS?
TEKS
STAAR Reporting
Category
Assessed
Curriculum
Essence
Statement
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
TEKS Vertical
Alignment
Curriculum
Frameworks
Prerequisite Skills
Assessment Tasks
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TEKS Vertical Alignment Documents
• Complete listing of the TEKS academic content
standards from prekindergarten through all high
school courses on the minimum high school
program.
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
TEKS Curriculum Frameworks
• Organized by
STAAR Reporting
Categories
• Summarizes the
grade-level TEKS
into an “essence
statement”
• Lists prerequisite
skills for a specific
essence statement
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Essence Statements
STAAR
Reporting
Category
Three of the four
essence statements are
NEW this year.
Assessed
TEKS
Essence
Statement
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Essence Statements
• Prerequisite skill targets have been added to the
Essence Statement documents to inform teachers
as to the grade-level link for the tasks
Assessed essence statements
are lettered ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Standardized Assessment Tasks
STAAR Reporting Category
Assessed
TEKS
Essence
Statement
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Assessment Tasks
Definitions and Examples
• The Definitions and
Examples pages for the
assessment tasks have
been expanded.
• These pages proceed
each essence
statement and provide
valuable information
and ideas for the tasks.
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
ARD Decision-Making
• If STAAR, with or without accommodations, is
NOT appropriate for a student, the ARD
committee must review participation
requirements for one of the alternate
assessments.
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
ARD Decision-Making for
STAAR Alternate
23
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Changes to the ARD Process
• Only ARD committees can select the
complexity level or levels for each subject.
• The teacher can no longer select the
complexity level and must abide by the ARD
committee decision.
• If the teacher feels that the selected
complexity level no longer reflects the
student’s performance, the ARD committee
must reconvene to evaluate the previous
decision.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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STAAR Alternate
Participation
Requirements
The 2013-2014
Participation Requirements
have been posted in both
Spanish and English.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Participation Requirements
Note the date on the form
• STAAR Alternate Participation Requirements
• State-required documentation form
• Must be completed and retained by the district when
eligibility for an alternate assessment is confirmed
• MUST be included in the IEP
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Participation Requirements
Determine who is responsible for
verifying the information.
• The district personnel named in the form is responsible for making
sure the ARD committee discusses each section
• The district personnel who completes these forms should be a
member of the ARD committee who can verify the information on
the form
• These forms should be completed during the ARD committee
meeting when assessment decisions are made.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Step I: Review the Eligibility Criteria
• Eligibility is considered for all tested subjects in the
student’s enrolled grade or enrolled EOC courses
• The answer to all 5 eligibility questions must be YES.
• If the answer to any of the questions is NO, the
student is not eligible to participate in STAAR Alternate
and must participate in one of the other statewide
assessments.
If the student is eligible to take STAAR Alternate,
then he/she must take this assessment for all
subjects/courses.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Step I: Review the Eligibility Criteria
• The ARD committee must review each of the five questions and
circle YES or NO.
• Each “Yes” answer requires a justification that contains evidence
that the student meets the criteria. The recorded justification does
not have to be referenced by IEP page numbers, but should be based
on quantifiable evidence.
Based on PLAAFP; narrative/anecdotal;
not just IEP page/section number
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Eligibility Criteria – Question 1
• A significant cognitive disability is determined by the ARD committee and must
be based on evaluation information performed by a qualified evaluation team.
• The disability must affect the student’s intellectual potential and be
documented in the student’s IEP.
• A student with a significant cognitive disability has limited potential to reach
grade-level expectations.
• While a student with a learning disability may have academic challenges, he or
she has the intellectual potential to reach grade-level expectations and,
therefore, is not eligible to take STAAR Alternate.
Justification (Example): Based on Amy’s most current FIE, her full scale
IQ falls well below 70 indicating a limitation in intellectual functioning.
Adaptive behavior scales indicate significant deficits in the following
domains: self-care, socialization, and communication skills. The team
agrees that she meets the eligibility criteria for STAAR Alternate as a
student with an intellectual disability.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Eligibility Criteria – Question 2
• Federal regulations mandate that all students have access to and be assessed
on grade-level curriculum.
• To access the grade-level curriculum, a student with a significant cognitive
disability needs specialized academic instruction.
• Additionally, a student eligible for STAAR Alternate requires support
throughout the day in areas such as communicating needs, navigating the
classroom or school building, eating lunch, negotiating social situations,
and/or taking care of personal needs.
Justification (Example): Amy has difficulty attending to tasks and requires
numerous redirections to stay focused. When in a large group for instruction, Amy
is easily distracted and does not process language well. Her expressive language
delays make it difficult for Amy to express her needs in a large group. Because of
this, Amy requires specialized instruction in a small group setting for academic
skills. Amy’s weak language skills also make it difficult for her to respond
appropriately in social situations; therefore, she requires assistance during
nonacademic school activities. Amy requires assistance to perform all self-care
skills.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Eligibility Criteria – Question 3
• The student needs specialized academic instruction and
techniques over a period of time to learn and retain
information.
• Instruction in a variety of settings is required in order for the
student to transfer skills (generalize).
Justification (Example): Amy’s short attention span and distractibility
require her to need numerous repetitions and drill in order to retain
knowledge. Additionally, she acquires and retains knowledge best
when skills are taught in the setting or situation in which the skill
naturally occurs. For example, to address a social studies prerequisite
skill involving economics, Amy was more successful in purchasing an
item in the school store rather than in a classroom simulation.
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Eligibility Criteria – Question 4
• Access to the grade-level curriculum is mandated by the federal
government.
• A student with a significant cognitive disability requires access to the
TEKS through prerequisite skills.
• Prerequisite skills are student expectations from previous grades that
are linked to the grade-level curriculum.
Justification (Example): Although Amy shows relative strengths in the
areas of math calculation and math reasoning, she is performing skills
that are several grade levels behind her grade 8 peers in all academic
areas. Her access to the grade-level TEKS is through prerequisite skills.
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Eligibility Criteria – Question 5
• Although a student may be able to perform some academic tasks such as
writing simple phrases or sentences, reading short sentences, or calculating
mathematics problems, he or she is typically evaluated by methods other
than paper and pencil.
• A one-day, multiple-choice test would not be an appropriate format to
effectively measure what a student has learned.
• Observation of student performance while the student manipulates items,
verbalizes responses, eye gazes, or activates an augmentative
communication device provides more accurate measurement of skills.
Justification (Example): Amy has limited writing skills, is easily frustrated
with writing tasks, and produces written work only through the use of
assistive technology. If allowed to demonstrate skills through
manipulation or technology, Amy is much more successful. A one-day
multiple choice test is not appropriate to show mastery of skills. Amy’s
teachers routinely take data on IEP goals after observing performance
tasks.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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STAAR Alternate
Participation
Requirements
35
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Step II: Discuss Assurances
• If “Yes” is indicated for all of the eligibility questions for
STAAR Alternate, the ARD committee must discuss the
assurances in Step II, and the district personnel
completing the form must initial each one after it is
discussed.
Initials
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Step II: Discuss Assurances
• the district personnel completing the form must
assure that the committee discussed the impact of
the decision on graduation plans.
Elementary/MS
High School
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Step II:
Discuss Assurances
• Students are only eligible to take STAAR Alternate
if they are accessing the curriculum through
prerequisite skills. For high school students, EOC
courses are denoted by a special PEIMS code for
each course required on the MHSP.
“Alternate” course
codes end in “7”
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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PEIMS Codes for EOC Courses
• Codes are provided for all 12 of the
original EOC courses
• Be sure the student is enrolled in the
alternate course with the appropriate
PEIMS code
• Districts should continue to use these
PEIMS codes, even though the alternate
assessment will be revised for next year
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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“ARD Guide for Determining High
School STAAR Alternate Assessments”
• For grades 3-8, the enrolled
grade determines the
subjects that will be tested.
• Students are required to
participate in all STAAR
Alternate EOC assessments
sometime during high
school
• The ARD committee
determines what year each
high school course and
assessment will be taken.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Step III:
Summarize Assessment Decisions
• Indicate the subjects in which the student
will take STAAR Alternate based on meeting
the eligibility criteria.
 The subject/course
 Enter the complexity level
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Questions?
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Making the Complexity Level Decision
• The ARD committee
will make the decision
for which complexity
level or combinations
of complexity levels
are appropriate for a
student for each
subject being assessed.
• The teacher must
abide by the decision.
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Making the Complexity Level Decision
• The first step in selecting the complexity level is
to pinpoint which characteristics from the
complexity level or indicators of progress box
best describe the student’s maximum
performance for a given subject.
• This decision should be based on challenging
expectations and be indicative of how the
student is expected to perform after instruction.
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Making the Complexity Level Decision
• The ARD committee will determine that the student will
be assessed for each subject/course on:
• A specific complexity level for all tasks for all four
essence statements per subject/course, OR
• A range between two complexity levels as determined
by the indicators of progress
Solid Complexity Level
Description
L3
L2
L1
NRO
Indicators of Progress Box
Combinations of
Complexity Levels
L3 and L2
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
L2 and L1
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“Student Characteristics for the STAAR
Alternate Complexity Levels”
• The ARD committee
must use this chart to
find the best
description of the
student’s performance
before determining the
complexity level or
combinations of levels
to be used for the
assessment.
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
What is the difference between the
complexity levels?
Complexity Level 3
• Most complex
• Application
Complexity Level 2
• Moderately complex
• Basic Recall
Complexity Level 1
• Least complex
• Beginning Awareness
NRO
• No Response Observed
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Complexity Level 3
Application of Knowledge
Level 3 Complexity Level
Student:
Decides which materials are needed for a specific task
on his or her own or from a wide array of appropriate
and inappropriate options
Develops or adjusts strategies to accomplish a specific
task
Interprets or analyzes information
Formulates original responses to questions requiring
higher-level thinking skills
48
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Complexity Level 3
• Complexity Level 3 assessment tasks are the most complex and
involve applying knowledge beyond basic recall.
• Some of the skills students at this level are expected to demonstrate
may include:
• determining distinguishing features, organizing information,
comparing components, generating ideas, making inferences, and
justifying answers.
No choices can be given.
The student must demonstrate the skill “on his or her own.”
• Level 3 requires a student to:
•
•
•
•
internalize skills beyond basic recall
use higher–level thinking skills
arrive at answers “on his or her own” as choices cannot be provided
gather information or demonstrate skills using a wide array of materials
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Complexity Level 2
Basic understanding
Level 2 Complexity Level
Student:
Correctly makes choices when at least three options are
provided
Distinguishes the varying characteristics of items
Answers literal questions posed to him or her
Recalls information previously learned
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Complexity Level 2
• Complexity Level 2 assessment tasks are moderately complex
and involve recalling information.
• Some of the skills students at this level are expected to demonstrate
may include:
• identifying or sorting elements, assisting in procedures, choosing
options, matching components, replicating information, and
examining features.
Choices are always provided.
• Level 2 requires a student to:
• demonstrate only a basic understanding of information
• recall or reproduce information
• arrive at answers when at least three choices are provided
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Complexity Level I
Beginning Awareness
Level 1 Complexity Level
Student:
Authentically responds to stimuli after experiencing
them through the senses
Is unable to make a choice when two options are
offered
Cannot answer questions posed to him or her
Communicates in subtle changes in affect or body
movement
52
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Complexity Level 1
• Complexity Level 1 assessment tasks are the least complex and
involve responding to knowledge at the beginning awareness level.
• Some of the skills students at this level are expected to demonstrate
may include:
• acknowledging features, responding to stimuli, participating in
processes, exploring materials, and anticipating outcomes.
No choices are allowed since the student is not required to
make decisions based on the information.
• Level 1 tasks often measure skills building up to the essence
statement.
• Level 1 requires a student to :
• be aware of the task as it is occurring
• be aware of a change in stimuli but not be required to act on the stimuli
• be aware of information but not make choices or decisions based on the
information
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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NRO – No Response Observed
• For students who are not displaying characteristics
for the Level 1 complexity level, the characteristics
for No Response Observed may be applicable.
No Response Observed (NRO)
Student:
 Is unable to make an authentic response to any stimuli
 Moves due to internal stimuli rather than stimuli presented to him
or her
 Tracks or fixates on objects that are not part of the task
 Vocalizes intermittently before, during, and after the task
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Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
NRO – No Response Observed
• If the ARD committee feels that the student meets the
characteristics defining NRO, the committee can select
NRO as the complexity level for all the tasks.
• The test administrator will then plan one Level 1 task
per subject and attempt the observation to verify that
the student cannot authentically respond to the
academic stimuli.
• If the student is able to respond during the assessment
observation, the test administrator must request an ARD
meeting to review the student’s IEP and assessment
decisions so Level 1 can be considered.
55
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
NRO – No Response Observed
• The No Response Observed (NRO) designation can
be used if the student is unable to display any
observable change in affect or movement due to
an ongoing medical condition or the severity of
the student’s disability.
• Students in the NRO category typically do not
respond to any academic stimuli throughout the
day.
• This designation is not for the student who refuses
to respond.
• An NRO assessment is not considered a failure and
is not part of AYP ratings.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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NRO – No Response Observed
• No combinations of levels for students
between NRO and Level 1 are possible.
• If a student can provide an authentic
response to any of the predetermined
criterion in an assessment task
• the NRO designation is not appropriate.
• the student must be assessed at Level 1 for all
tasks for that subject
57
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Indicators of Progress
• For students who have developed beyond
a complexity level, but have not
consistently been able to display
characteristics at the next higher
complexity level, indicators of progress
characteristics have been developed to
help identify those students.
58
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Indicators of Progress
No Response Observed (NRO)
Student:
 Is unable to make an authentic
response to any academic stimuli
 Moves due to internal stimuli rather
than stimuli presented to him or her
 Tracks or fixates on objects that are
not part of the task
 Vocalizes intermittently before,
during, and after the task
Combinations
of NRO and
Level 1 are
NOT allowed.
Level 1 Complexity Level
Student:
 Authentically responds to stimuli
after experiencing them through the
senses
 Is unable to make a choice when two
options are offered
 Cannot answer questions posed to
him or her
 Communicates in subtle changes in
affect or body movement
Indicators of Progress for Level 1
Student:
 Begins to show response to a stimuli
belatedly or inconsistently
 Becomes still or remains quiet when a
specific noise or item is near
 Increases vocalizations or movements in the
presence of a specific stimuli
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Level 1 will be
the decision.
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Indicators of Progress
Level 1 Complexity Level
Level 2 Complexity Level
Student:
 Authentically responds to stimuli after
experiencing them through the senses
 Is unable to make a choice when two
options are offered
 Cannot answer questions posed to him
or her
 Communicates in subtle changes in
affect or body movement
Student:
 Correctly makes choices when at least
three options are provided
 Distinguishes the varying
characteristics of items
 Answers literal questions posed to him
or her
 Recalls information previously learned
Combinations
of Level 1 and
Level 2 are
allowed.
Indicators of Progress for Level 2
Student:
 Begins to show interest and seeks out the
same object or task
 Focuses on and more readily acknowledges
objects or representations
 Performs tasks similar to Level 2 tasks in daily
instruction
 Needs less cueing and prompting for Level 1
tasks
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Indicators of Progress
Level 2 Complexity Level
Student:
 Correctly makes choices when at least
three options are provided
 Distinguishes the varying characteristics
of items
 Answers literal questions posed to him
or her
 Recalls information previously learned
Combinations of
Level 2 and
Level 3 are
allowed.
Level 3 Complexity Level
Student:
 Decides which materials are needed for
a specific task on his or her own or from
a wide array of appropriate and
inappropriate options
 Develops or adjusts strategies to
accomplish a specific task
 Interprets or analyzes information
 Formulates original responses to
questions requiring higher-level
thinking skills
Indicators of Progress for Level 3
Student:
 Begins to see relationships between groups
 Can sometimes predict outcomes
 Provides responses without choices
 Needs less cueing and prompting for Level 2
tasks
 Performs tasks similar to Level 3 tasks in daily
instruction
Texas Education Agency's Student Assessment Division
61
Questions?
62
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
ARD Considerations for
STAAR Alternate Decision-Making
• If the student is clearly described by the characteristics in
one of the complexity level boxes, it is inappropriate to
assess that student at a lower complexity level.
• It is also inappropriate to assess a student at a lower
complexity level just to improve his or her score on the
assessment.
• Students who demonstrate skills on tasks with cueing should not
be automatically moved to a lower complexity level.
• Students who cannot successfully demonstrate all three
predetermined criteria should not be automatically moved to a
lower complexity level.
63
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
ARD Considerations for
STAAR Alternate Decision-Making
• The ARD committee decision regarding the complexity
level or levels to be used for the assessment must be
noted on page 2 of the STAAR Alternate Participation
Requirements and the teacher must abide by the decision
• If the ARD Committee recommended a combination of
two complexity levels, the teacher will make the final
decision of which task between the two complexity level
options will be used for the primary observation.
At least one task at the higher level must
be observed when combinations of
complexity levels are chosen.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
64
ARD Considerations for
STAAR Alternate Decision-Making
• The teacher becomes the test
administrator and prepares for the
primary observation by:
• providing additional instruction according to
TEA resource documents
• determining the presentation supports,
materials, and response modes appropriate for
each task
• documenting the preplanning decision on page
one of the state-required documentation form
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
65
ARD Considerations for
STAAR Alternate Decision-Making
• If the teacher determines at any time that the
complexity level decision made by the ARD
committee needs to be reviewed either due to
student progress or regression, the ARD
committee must reconvene and determine the
new complexity level decision following the
same process as outlined in this presentation.
66
Texas Education Agency's Student Assessment Division
ARD Considerations for
STAAR Alternate Decision-Making
• The ARD committee must ensure the assessment decision and
accommodations needed to measure the student’s academic
achievement have been documented in the student’s IEP.
• These accommodations will be the basis for the STAAR
Alternate presentation supports, materials, and response
modes provided during the assessment observation and
recorded on page 1 of the documentation form.
67
Texas Education Agency's Student Assessment Division
STAAR Alternate and SSI
• Students taking STAAR Alternate are not subject to SSI requirements.
• Due to the design of STAAR Alternate, teachers make observations
throughout the academic year using preplanned instructional
supports and are expected to provide any necessary remediation
during the course of the academic year. There is no need for retests
as observations can be repeated if needed due to special
circumstances.
• Typically, students taking STAAR Alternate are already receiving
intensive, individualized instructional support on a daily basis that
takes into account the pace and amount of material appropriate for
the student.
Additional information regarding SSI requirements can be
located at the following website:
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/ssi.
Texas Education Agency's Student Assessment Division
68
How are ARD committee
decisions shared with other
appropriate individuals In
your district or on your
campus?
69
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Additional Considerations
70
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Performance Data for 2014
• The adjusted cut score of 48 will be
applied to the 2014 results to comply with
House Bill 906 of the 83rd Legislative
Session.
71
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Performance Data for 2014
• The student’s Confidential Student Report
will also report growth between 2013 and
2014.
• Growth results will be
calculated using a
stage change table
and reported as Did
Not Meet, Met, or
Exceeded Growth.
72
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
STAAR Alternate Timelines
• The STAAR
Alternate Timeline
has been posted
and will be updated
periodically as
specific dates for
events have been
determined.
73
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Important Dates
• October 7, 2013
• Access to the final attempt for qualification activities
will become available from the Training Center to
district and campus staff
• Testing coordinators are responsible for providing the
access code for the final to teachers.
The Training Center access code for
new personnel is
STAARALT1314
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
74
Important Dates
• November 15, 2013
• Documentation forms posted
• January 6, 2014 – April 18, 2014
• STAAR Alternate Assessment Window
• March 28, 2014
• Transfer cut-off date
75
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
ARD Committee Decisions
for Next Year
• The new assessment will be an item based
test; there will no complexity levels
• Participation requirements may change
but the test will not be expanded to
include the “modified” assessment
• ARD Committees can only decide if the
student requires an alternate assessment
due to instruction based on alternate
achievement standards
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
76
Anything else?
Stay tuned!
Keep checking
the TEA
website!
77
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Education Service Center Region XI
Assessment Contacts
• Laura Carson – Coordinator for Curriculum,
Instruction and Assessment
(817) 740-7573 or [email protected]
• Peggy DeMoss – Federal and State
Assessment
(817) 740-7529 or [email protected]
• Sharon Rutherford – Special Education
Assessment
(817) 740-7574 or [email protected]
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
78
Notes for local district training
• These slides may be used for training of
local district personnel
• If any slide is amended or revised for use
in local trainings, please change the footer
at the bottom of the slide and indicate ESC
Region XI as the source
Provided by _______ ISD (Source: ESC Region 11
and TEA Student Assessment Division)
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
79

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