IDM Toolkit Overview Presentation Version 1-0

Report
Infrastructure Delivery
Management Toolkit:
2010 Edition
Overview
1
cidb
development through partnership
Contents of this presentation
•
•
•
•
Purpose of the Toolkit and how it will help users
What’s new in the 2010 edition
Structure of the Toolkit
The Infrastructure Delivery Management System
(IDMS)
• Introduction to some key concepts
2
cidb
development through partnership
Purpose of the Toolkit & how it will help users
• Provides a documented body of knowledge and set of processes
that represent generally recognised best practices in the delivery
management of infrastructure
• Focussed on the delivery and life cycle management of South
African public sector infrastructure
• Target users include both technical and non-technical managers
• Provides “how to” guidelines for infrastructure delivery and
procurement management necessary to deliver, operate and
maintain infrastructure
• Helps capacitate managers
• Facilitates a uniform approach to infrastructure delivery
management
• The Toolkit, when adhered to, will also assist departments in
complying with applicable legislative requirements
3
cidb
development through partnership
What’s new in the 2010 edition
• Modernised approach to procurement
• Strategic procurement
• Gateway system
• Institutionalise alternative delivery models
• Introduces the concept of Packages
• Updated and user friendly web based IDMS
• Alignment to GIAMA
• Readiness for Local Government
• Emphasis on “Portfolio Management”
• New modules:
• Provincial Infrastructure Strategy
• Construction Procurement Strategy
• Operations and Maintenance
• Performance Management
4
cidb
development through partnership
Structure of Toolkit
Components of
the Toolkit
Structure of Toolkit – Components
Management Companion:
Management
Companion
• A quick reference guide
• Key audience: Executive, top and senior management
• Provides senior managers with sufficient understanding
so as to hold middle managers accountable.
• Contains high level summary information – for all users
• Provides middle managers with a quick reference
Printed in pocket book size – A5
• Will be published in print (as well as electronic) format
by CIDB
• Also printable by user by download off the IDMS
Structure of Toolkit – Components
Delivery Management Guidelines:
• Key audience:
– The “do’ers” of the work
– Middle to lower managers & specialists
– Director, Deputy Director, Assistant Director
• The main body of knowledge, mainly text, to provide subject
matter knowledge per module
• Provides context and guidelines to using the IDMS
• Generic enough to apply to all three spheres of government, but
focussed for Provincial
• A4 type size – printable by user by download off the IDMS
• Divided into 3 Delivery Process Guidelines and 3 Practice Guides
Structure of Toolkit – Components
Infrastructure Delivery Management System (IDMS):
• Key audience:
– The “do’ers” of the work
– Middle to lower managers & specialists
– Director, Deputy Director, Assistant Director
•
•
•
•
•
Roadmaps for users on “what must I do?” in each of the modules
Navigation tool through the detailed content
Generic enough to apply to any Provincial Department
Includes the Templates, Examples & Supporting Docs
Web based - hosted on CIDB server – no software required by
user
• Also avail on CD – will be attached to Management Companion
• Includes PDF versions of Delivery Management Guideline modules
and Management Companion & other docs, i.e. printable by the
user if need be
Structure of Toolkit – Content
Management Companion - Pocket book summary version:
•Overview
•Guidelines to the Delivery Processes (DP’s):
•DP1 Portfolio Management
•DP2 Project Management
•DP3 Operations and Maintenance
•Practice Guides (PG’s):
•PG 1 Provincial Infrastructure Strategy
•PG2 Construction Procurement Strategy
•PG3 Performance Management.
Delivery Management Guidelines (DMG) - The main body of knowledge:
•Overview
•Guidelines to the Delivery Processes:
•DP1 Portfolio Management
•DP2 Project Management
•DP3 Operations and Maintenance
•Practice Guides:
•PG 1 Provincial Infrastructure Strategy
•PG2 Construction Procurement Strategy
•PG3 Performance Management.
Infrastructure Delivery Management System (IDMS):
• Web based tool for users to navigate through the delivery management
processes via “roadmaps”
9
cidb
development through partnership
Structure of the Toolkit - 2006 vs 2010 editions
Comparison of components 2006 edition versus 2010 edition
2006 edition
2010 edition
-
Management Companion
Infrastructure Delivery
Guidelines
Delivery Management
Guidelines
DMS (excel spreadsheets)
IDMS (web based)
Structure of the Toolkit – 2006 vs 2010 editions
Guideline Modules
Current Toolkit
New Toolkit
Module 1 – Overview and Glossary
Overview
Module 2 – Infrastructure Planning and
Programme Management by the client
DP1: Portfolio Management
Module 2 Part A – Infrastructure Planning
Module 2 Part B – Infrastructure
Programme Management
Module 3 – Infrastructure programme
implementation by Implementing Agents
DP2: Project Management
Module 4 – Project delivery
-
DP3: Maintenance & Operations
-
PG1: Provincial Infrastructure Strategy
Module 5 – Construction procurement
PG2: Construction Procurement Strategy
-
PG3: Performance Management
The IDMS
Infrastructure Delivery Management System (IDMS)
• The model that describes the processes that make up
public sector infrastructure management, mainly
applied to the construction industry
• It outlines the core processes associated with the
model for planning, delivery, procurement , operation
and maintenance of infrastructure works
• Three Delivery Processes:
• DP1 Portfolio Management
• DP2 Project Management
• DP3 Operations and Maintenance
The IDMS
• Built up in layers:
– Main delivery processes – Level 1
– Sub delivery processes – Levels 2 and 3
•
•
•
•
DP1: Portfolio Management
DP1-1 Infrastructure Planning
Delivery Gates
G1(a)
PC
Procurement milestones
1
PF1.3
Performance Management processes
Triggers – an action to trigger a forward pass action to
a future process.
T1
See animation
IDMS – Comparison of 2006 versus 2010 edition
2006 edition DMS (linear)
Strategy
Provincial
Infrastructure
Strategy
PGDS
O&M
M&E
Economic
ASGISA
Implementation
Planning
SDA
Consolidated IP
IPMP
IPIP
Update IP
Responsibility
Matrix
Design
Project
Tender
Project
Implement
Day to
Day
Operati
ons
and
Mainte
nance
Social
Environment
vs 2010 IDMS
Prov Infr Strat
DP1: Portfolio
Management
Perf Mgt
DP2: Project
Management
DP3:
O&M
IDMS – Comparison of 2006 versus 2010 edition
Align
Management Demand
Departmental
Strategic
Planning
1. Infrastructure
Planning
2. Programme
Client Programme
Management
3. Programme
Implementation
4. Project
Delivery
5.
Procurement
Acquisition Management
Implementing Department
Client Department Management
Departmental
Mandate and
Policies
Supply Chain Management Functions
DMS (2010 edition)
Introduction to some key concepts
Portfolios, Programmes and
Projects
Highest level
Portfolio
Lower level
Portfolios
Higher level
Programmes
Higher level
Programmes
Higher level
Programmes
Lower level
Programmes
Lower level
Programmes
Projects
Projects
Projects
Other work
See animation
Introduction to some key concepts
Packages
Definition: Works which have been grouped together for delivery
under a single contract or a package order
• Advantage is to enhance efficiencies in the procurement process
•It was partly motivated by the fact that the traditional approach has
often been to procure a single contractor for a single project under a
single contract
•While this seems logical at a single project level, it does not exploit
the potential efficiencies of grouping a number of works items
together, i.e. a Package, under a single contract.
• By grouping these works items together a number of efficiencies will
be obtained such as simplified Supply Chain Management, grouped
controls, grouped supervision and grouped reporting
Introduction to some key concepts
Packages
Introduction to some key concepts
The Gateway System
The CIDB Infrastructure Gateway Process provides a
number of control points (gates) in the infrastructure life
cycle where a decision is required before proceeding from
one stage to another. Such decisions need to be based
on information that is provided during the infrastructure life
cycle. If the Gateway Process is correctly followed it will
provide assurance that a project involving the design,
construction, refurbishment, alteration, rehabilitation or
maintenance remains within agreed mandates and that it
aligns with the purpose for which it was conceived and
can thus progress successfully from one stage to the next.
Introduction to some key concepts
Construction Procurement Strategy
A construction procurement strategy is the combination of the delivery
management strategy and contracting and procurement
arrangements. A construction procurement strategy can be developed
for a single project, a programme of projects or a portfolio of projects
to identify the best way of achieving objectives and value for money,
whilst taking into account risks and constraints.
Once the necessary decisions relating to the delivery management
strategy, contracting strategy and the procurement arrangements
have been made, the procurement strategy may be documented and
implemented in respect of each package. Thereafter, depending upon
the choices that are made, the design team might need to be
managed, and the contract managed or administered in accordance
with the provisions of the contract. Additional Programme
Management practices will also be required to be applied where
projects are delivered under a programme.
Introduction to some key concepts
The “Alignment Model
Introduction to some key concepts
Principles of cooperative governance and joint Programme Management
The concept of managing immovable asset delivery as a joint
programme is founded in the Constitution. It is do be implemented,
amongst others, via the Intergovernmental Relations Framework Act
(IGR) and GIAMA Clause 14 (1) (b) which prescribes that: “The
accounting officer of a user or custodian in its capacity as a user
must, for all the immovable assets that it uses or intends to use jointly conduct the immovable asset strategic planning process with
the relevant custodian”.
The IGR Act establishes a framework for the national, provincial and
local governments to promote and facilitate intergovernmental
relations, and to provide for mechanisms and procedures to facilitate
the settlement of intergovernmental disputes. The Framework further
extends the principles of participation and co-ordination between
organs of state in the different spheres of government, to also include
integration, participation and co-ordination of joint programmes within
a particular sphere of government.
Introduction to some key concepts
Risk management
All projects are exposed to risks that could potentially negatively, or
positively, impact on delivering the required outcomes of the project.
Therefore it is good practice in the management of any Portfolio,
Programme or Project to ensure that a concerted Risk Management
Plan is developed and implemented.
Definition of Project Risk: An uncertain event or condition that, if it
occurs, has a positive or negative effect on a project’s objectives.
The objective of Project Risk Management is therefore to increase the
probability and impact of positive events, and decrease the probability
and impact of negative events.
Conclusion and questions
Thank you
cidb
25

similar documents