Linking Standards Prof to Classroom

Report
LINKING STANDARDS AND PROFICIENCY
TO YOUR CLASSROOM
Mary Lynn Redmond
ACTFL President
Marty Abbott
ACTFL Executive Director
Today’s Learning Goals
I can …
• Describe the WHAT, HOW, and HOW WELL to
guide my teaching and my students’ learning
• Connect key national initiatives to my daily
classroom instruction
• Identify effective and appropriate means to
measure student growth
• Describe various components for supporting and
evaluating teacher effectiveness
Hello
Unlock the Gateway to Communication
Backward Design
• 1. What are the goals?
Identify desired results
• 2. How will you and learners
know they reached the goals?
Identify acceptable evidence
• 3. What does it take to get
there?
Plan learning experiences
and instruction
Backward Design
• 1. What are the goals? Identify
desired results
WHAT
Standards
HOW WELL
Proficiency Levels
Timeline
Standards for Learning Languages
 1993 – 1996 Standards developed under Goals
2000 Educate America Act
 1996 Publication of Standards for Foreign Language
Learning: Preparing for the 21st Century (with 10
languages)
 2000 Publication of Standards for Foreign Language
Learning in the 21st Century (with Chinese)
 2006 Publication of Standards for Foreign Language
Learning in the 21st Century (with Arabic)
 2013 Refreshed World-Readiness Standards for
Learning Languages Hello
Standards Collaborative Board
(16 national language organizations)
Our “Common Core”:
5 Cs and the 11 descriptive standards
– State Standards in over 40 states
– Local curricula based on these Standards
– Teacher preparation based on these Standards
Process to “refresh” the Standards
influenced by 2011 report, A Decade of
Foreign Language Standards: Impact,
Influence, and Future Directions
Guiding Principles for “refreshing”
standards:
• Maintain the essence of each standard
• Clarify the language
FROM:
Interpersonal Communication: Students engage in
conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings
and emotions, and exchange opinions.
TO:
Interpersonal Communication: Learners interact and negotiate
meaning in spoken, signed, or written conversations to share
information, reactions, feelings, and opinions
FROM:
Practices of Culture: Students demonstrate an understanding
of the relationship between the practices and perspectives of
the culture studied.
TO:
Relating Cultural Practices to Perspectives: Learners use the
language to investigate, explain, and reflect on the relationship
between the practices and perspectives of the cultures studied
FROM:
Lifelong Learning: Students show evidence of becoming lifelong learners by using the language for personal enjoyment
and enrichment
TO:
Lifelong Learning: Learners set goals and reflect on their
progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment, and
advancement
Linking Common Core &
World Languages
Reading
----------------------------------
Interpretive
Listening
Interpersonal
Presentational
Writing
-----------------------------
Speaking
and
Listening
Proficiency
Speaking
Levels:
Novice
Intermediate
Advanced
www.actfl.org/commoncore
http://www.actfl.org/commoncore
Language
• Conventions
• How language
functions
• Vocabulary
15
Performance Points Toward Proficiency
Documenting Student Growth
Describing Performance
WHAT:
Standards forDescriptors
Learning
Performance
2012
Languages
• Five Cs
• Three Modes of
Communication
HOW WELL:
• 2012 Performance Descriptors
for Language Learners
• Update and revision of 1998
Performance Guidelines for K12 Learners
www.actfl.org – Publications – Performance Descriptors
Performance
Three Ranges of Performance:
Novice
Intermediate
Advanced
Three Modes of Communication: Interpersonal, Interpretive, Presentational
ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines
www.actflproficiencyguidelines2012.org
ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines
www.actflproficiencyguidelines2012.org/speaking
Domain
Functions
Examples
 Ask formulaic questions
 Initiate, maintain, and end a
conversation
 Create with language
 Narrate and describe
 Make inferences
What it describes
Functions are the global tasks the
learner can perform in the
language
21
Domain
Functions
Contexts
and
Content
Examples
 Ask formulaic questions
 Initiate, maintain, and end a
conversation
 Create with language
 Narrate and describe
 Make inferences
 Oneself
 One’s immediate environment
 General interest
 Work-related
What it describes
Functions are the global tasks the
learner can perform in the
language
Contexts are situations within
which the learner can function;
Content is the topics which the
learner can understand and
discuss
22
Domain
Functions
Contexts
and
Content
Text Type
Examples
 Ask formulaic questions
 Initiate, maintain, and end a
conversation
 Create with language
 Narrate and describe
 Make inferences
 Oneself
 One’s immediate environment
 General interest
 Work-related







Words
Phrases
Sentences
Questions
Strings of sentences
Connected sentences
Paragraphs
What it describes
Functions are the global tasks the
learner can perform in the
language
Contexts are situations within
which the learner can function;
Content is the topics which the
learner can understand and
discuss
Text type controlled by the
learner is that which the learner
is able to understand and
produce in order to perform the
functions of the level
23
How / How well able to be understood and to understand
Domain
Language
Control
What it answers
How accurate is the
language learner’s
language?
What it describes
Describes the level of control the
learner has over certain language
features or strategies to produce
or understand language
24
How / How well able to be understood and to understand
Domain
What it answers
Language
Control
How accurate is the
language learner’s
language?
Vocabulary
How extensive and
applicable is the language
learner’s vocabulary?
What it describes
Describes the level of control the
learner has over certain language
features or strategies to produce
or understand language
Describes the parameters of
vocabulary used to produce or
understand language
25
How / How well able to be understood and to understand
Domain
Language
Control
Vocabulary
What it answers
How accurate is the
language learner’s
language?
How extensive and
applicable is the language
learner’s vocabulary?
Communica- How does the language
tion Strategies learner maintain
communication and make
meaning?
What it describes
Describes the level of control the
learner has over certain language
features or strategies to produce
or understand language
Describes the parameters of
vocabulary used to produce or
understand language
Describes the strategies used to
negotiate meaning, to
understand text and messages,
and to express oneself
26
How / How well able to be understood and to understand
Domain
Language
Control
Vocabulary
What it answers
How accurate is the
language learner’s
language?
How extensive and
applicable is the language
learner’s vocabulary?
Communica- How does the language
tion Strategies learner maintain
communication and make
meaning?
Cultural
How is the language
Awareness
learner’s cultural
knowledge reflected in
language use?
What it describes
Describes the level of control the
learner has over certain language
features or strategies to produce
or understand language
Describes the parameters of
vocabulary used to produce or
understand language
Describes the strategies used to
negotiate meaning, to
understand text and messages,
and to express oneself
Describes the cultural products,
practices, or perspectives the
language learner may employ to
communicate more successfully
27
in the cultural setting
Proficiency – Performance
Advanced
Intermediate
Novice
•
Isolated words
• Words and phrases
Quantity and Organization
of Language Expands
• Discrete sentences
• Strings of sentences
• Connected sentences
• Single paragraphs
• Multiple paragraphs
• Extended cogent discourse
Backward Design
• 1. What are the goals? Identify desired results
• 2. How will you and learners know they
reached the goals?
Identify acceptable evidence
NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements
The NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements
• Culmination of a collaborative effort between
NCSSFL and ACTFL
• Combination of two documents into one cohesive
set of statements
– NCSSFL LinguaFolio®
– ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines 2012
Intermediate Low - Interpersonal
ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines - Speaking
Speakers at the Intermediate Low sublevel are
able to handle successfully a limited number of
uncomplicated communicative tasks by creating
with the language in straightforward social
situations. Conversation is restricted to some of
the concrete exchanges and predictable topics
necessary for survival in the target-language
culture. These topics relate to basic personal
information; for example, self and family, some
daily activities and personal preferences, and
some immediate needs, such as ordering food and
making simple purchases. Speakers are primarily
reactive and struggle to answer direct questions or
requests for information. They are also able to ask
a few appropriate questions.
Can-Do Global
Benchmark
I can participate in
conversations on a
number of familiar topics
using simple sentences. I
can handle short social
interactions in everyday
situations by asking and
answering questions.
Global Benchmarks
Global Can-Do
Benchmarks
General description of
the proficiency level for
each of the modes
Screen shot Bold
Global Can-Do
Benchmarks
General
description of the
proficiency level
for each of the
modes
Screen shot Bold
Bold statements
Main indicators for
the level and the
mode
Screen shot Bold
Target statements
(Checklist)
Provide instructional
focus
Create class evidence
Should emphasize
“re-spiraling”
Screen shot Bold
Today’s Learning Goals
I can …
• Describe the WHAT, HOW, and HOW WELL to
guide my teaching and my students’ learning
• Connect key national initiatives to my daily
classroom instruction
• Identify effective and appropriate means to
measure student growth
Hello
Backward Design
• 1. What are the goals?
Identify desired results
• 2. How will you and learners know they
reached the goals
– NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements
– Integrated
Performance
Assessment
– AAPPL
IPA - Novice Level
TASK OVERVIEW: The university will be traveling to various study abroad fairs in
Spanish-speaking countries. You have been assigned the responsibility of creating a flier
to promote our university to prospective international studies interested in studying in
the U.S.
INTERPRETIVE TASK: In order to understand what international universities are like, you
look for information on the Internet. Your teacher finds the following text about la
Universidad de Puerto Rico en Río Piedras. Read the text carefully and complete the
comprehension questions that accompany it.
INTERPERSONAL TASK: Now you need to gather more information about the university
experience of other students at our university. Talk with a classmate to learn more
about his/her personal activities at the university. You want to know about his/her
majors, classes, daily schedule, living situation, weekend/leisure activities, and
transportation. Find out as much as you can from your partner in order to incorporate
details into your flier.
PRESENTATIONAL TASK: Based on what you have learned from your research, your
knowledge of the university, and class discussions, create a flier in which you promote
GVSU to Spanish-speaking university students. Your flier might include information
about classes, living situations, transportation, recreational opportunities
(sports/clubs/other campus/regional activities).
AAPPL - DEMO
http://aappl.actfl.org/demo
http://aappl.actfl.org/
Today’s Learning Goals
I can …
• Describe the WHAT, HOW, and HOW WELL to
guide my teaching and my students’ learning
• Connect key national initiatives to my daily
classroom instruction
• Identify effective and appropriate means to
measure student growth
By adopting this WHAT, HOW and HOW WELL –
what will students notice is different in language
classrooms?
Hello
Today’s Learning Goals
I can …
• Describe the WHAT, HOW, and HOW WELL to
guide my teaching and my students’ learning
• Connect key national initiatives to my daily
classroom instruction
• Identify effective and appropriate means to
measure student growth
• Describe various components for supporting
and evaluating teacher effectiveness
Hello
Position Statement - Draft
Teacher Effectiveness & Student Growth
Demonstrate for stakeholders the value of successful
language learning and teaching;
• Need multiple measures of student growth based on
evidence over time
• Employ performance assessments aligned to NCSSFLACTFL Can-Do Statements (all three modes of
communication, linked to proficiency levels)
• Feedback/data on learning targets should inform
teachers and students (next steps for instruction and
reflection for goal-setting)
Backward Design
• 1. What are the goals?
Identify desired results
• 2. How will you and
learners know they
reached the goals?
Identify acceptable evidence
• 3. What does it take to get there?
Plan learning experiences and instruction
The Keys to Planning for Learning:
Effective Curriculum, Unit, and Lesson Design
Plan learning experiences
and instruction
The Keys to Planning for Learning – Unit Design
The Curriculum
Framework is based on
building proficiency in
the three modes of
Communication
embedded in a Cultural
context, and enriched
by Connections,
Comparisons, and
Communities.
48
Plan learning experiences
and instruction
• Website:
http://www.actfl.org/publications/books-and-brochures/thekeys-planning-learning
• Resources and Templates
iPad App
ACTFL Unit and
Lesson Planner
(Available on
iTunes)
Teacher Education
Program Credentialing
www.actfl.org
and
www.caepnet.org.
Fox & Morrison, ACTFL, 2013
51
2013 ACTFL/CAEP Standards developed between 2009 and 2013
with input from the profession at all levels, aligned with the:
Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the Twenty-First
Century (2006) [the Five Cs], refreshed as World-Readiness
Standards for Learning Languages (2013);
 Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC)
Standards
 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards for
accomplished teachers (NBPTS)
 International Standard for Technology Education (ISTE)
For the ACTFL/CAEP standards, go to
https://www.actfl.org/professional-development/actfl-caep
State Teacher Certification
States Using Demonstration of Language Proficiency
for Some Aspect of Teacher Credentialing
 Alaska
Maine *
 Texas
 Arizona
Maryland *
 Utah
 Arkansas
New Jersey
 Vermont
 Connecticut
New York *
 Virginia *
 Delaware *
 Georgia *
North Carolina *  Washington
Ohio *
 Wisconsin
Oklahoma
 Wyoming
 Hawaii
Pennsylvania *
 Florida
Which standards to use? 2002
(ACTFL/NCATE) or 2013 (ACTFL/CAEP)?
2014 – fall 2015
2002 or 2013
Spring 2016 forward
2013
 Use one set or the other, don’t mix them
 If your program starts with 2002, continue with that set
until it achieves national recognition even if it takes
until after spring 2016. You are “in the pipeline.”
Recommended FL Program Components (no change)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Development of proficiency in all areas, especially oral
Ongoing assessment of proficiency
Language, linguistics, culture, and literature components
Dedicated methods course on teaching of FL, taught by qualified faculty
Early field experiences in FL classrooms
Field experiences and student teaching supervised by qualified FL
faculty
7. Opportunities for candidates to experience and use technology
8. Opportunities for structured study-abroad / immersion experiences
Judith L. Shrum
Standard for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century
(2006); refreshed as World-Readiness Standards for Language
Learning (2013)
Standards renamed
Standard
From (2002)
To (2013)
1
Language, Linguistics,
Comparisons
Language Proficiency: Interpersonal,
Interpretive, and Presentational
2
Cultures Literatures, CrossDisciplinary Concepts
Cultures, Linguistics, Literatures, and
Concepts from Other Disciplines
3
Language acquisition theories and
creating supportive environment
Language Acquisition Theories and
Knowledge of Students and Their Needs
4
Integration of Standards into
Curriculum and Instruction
Integration of Standards in Planning,
Classroom Practice, and Use of
Instructional Resources
5
Assessment
Assessment of languages and cultures –
Impact on Student Learning
6
Professionalism
Professional Development, Advocacy and
Ethics
Resources/Questions
Contact information:
Judith Shrum
[email protected]
540-320-0499
http://www.actfl.org/professional-development/actfl-caep
How will you use these initiatives and the resulting
documents to influence language teaching and learning?
How will you use these initiatives and the resulting
documents to influence language teaching and learning?
• Address teacher effectiveness/evaluation:
role in providing evidence to meet
requirements of your state’s formula
• Support language learners: in instructional
settings or as independent learners
• Advocate for language programs: early start,
longer sequences
Position Statement - Draft
WHY: Reaching Global Competence
The ability to communicate with respect and cultural
understanding in more than one language is an
essential element of global competency.
• Global Competence vital for global economy,
diplomacy/defense, global problem-solving, diverse
communities
• Global Competence described: readiness to
communicate, interact, withhold judgment, be alert
to differences and miscommunication, act with
respect, and increase knowledge of other cultures
• Hello
Today’s Learning Goals
I can …
• Describe the WHAT, HOW, and HOW WELL to
guide my teaching and my students’ learning
• Connect key national initiatives to my daily
classroom instruction
• Identify effective and appropriate means to
measure student growth
• Describe various components for supporting
and evaluating teacher effectiveness
What is one way standards and proficiency will
improve students’ language learning?
Hello

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