NonRevenue Water- Current and Future Remedies

Report
NONREVENUE WATER Current and Future Remedies
Gary Harstead
Director – Asset Management
United Water
NARUC Winter Meeting
February 2013
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UNITED WATER TODAY
 Water and Wastewater Services
– Approximately 5.7 million people served in 21 states
– Drinking water provided: 955 million gallons per day
– Wastewater treated: 1,205 million gallons per day
 2,300 employees
 $3.0 billion in total assets
 $800 million in revenues
 Wholly owned subsidiary of
SUEZ ENVIRONNEMENt since 2000
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UNITED WATER IN THE US
 Water and Wastewater Services
– Approximately 5.7 million people served in 21 states
– Drinking water provided: 955 million gallons per day
– Wastewater treated: 1,205 million gallons per day
 2,300 employees
 $3.0 billion in total assets
 $800 million in revenues
 Wholly owned subsidiary of Suez
Environnement since 2000
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Presentation Summary
Description of the problem
Definitions: Nonrevenue Water, not just
Unaccounted for Water
How do the losses occur?
Some solutions
A case study
Plans for the future
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NRW Reduction Drivers
 NRW is a business issue
– Lost revenue
– Increased operating expenses
 NRW is a “Sustainable Development” issue
– Waste of water resources
– Waste of energy and chemicals
 NRW is a Reputation Management issue
– NRW is easy to understand for people. It becomes an
overall rating of a utility’s competencies
 NRW reduction methods
– Usually costly and difficult to implement
– Have minimal impact as they address one component of
NRW at a time
– Often require “change” for employees and customers
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NRW Definition:
The percent of water introduced to the distribution network that does not
The
percent
of water introduced to the distribution network
produce
revenue
that does not produce revenue:
NRW
= 1- System Input – (Real Losses + Apparent Losses + Unmetered Use)
NRW =
1-
System Input
Billed Consumption
System Input
Real Losses: Water lost from the network that is not used by a customer, e.g. network leaks, main
breaks
OR
Apparent Losses: Water that is successfully delivered to the customer, but, for various reasons is not
recorded or measured accurately and is subsequently unbilled
Unmetered Use: System flushing, fire fighting and other authorized unmetered uses
NRW = 1- System Input – (Real Losses + Apparent Losses + Unmetered Use)
ORSystem Input
“Unaccounted NRW
for Water”
not
subtract
=
1 does
- Billed
Consumption
“Unmetered/unbilled Use”
System Input
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Components of NRW
NRW = 1- System Input – (Real Losses + Apparent Losses + Unmetered Use)
System Input
 Real Losses: Water lost from the network that is not used by customers or the
utility, e.g. network leaks, main breaks
 Apparent Losses: Water that is successfully delivered to the customer, but, for
various reasons is not recorded or measured accurately and is subsequently
not billed
 Unmetered Use: System flushing, fire fighting and other “authorized”
unmetered uses that is not billed.
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Real Losses – Locating and Repairing Leaks
 Water system characteristics vary widely due
to age, geology, geography, materials and
maintenance history.
 Leak detection success depends on above
AND personnel abilities.
 “Traditional” sounding methods most widely
used but have limitations.
 Advanced leak detection methods are very
expensive and application success will vary
based on the utility’s distribution system
characteristics.
 Reactive repairs are expensive and pipeline
replacement often due to other drivers, e.g.
break frequency, hydraulics and water
quality issues. DSIC Programs Help!
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Apparent Losses – Causes and Solutions Vary
 Meter Inaccuracy
 Unmeasured Low Flow
 Fire Service Line Use
 Meter Tampering
 Unauthorized taps
 Data handling/”Lost”
Customers
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United Water’s Use of “AquaCircle” – A software
tool developed by Suez Environnement to identify
components of NRW and to make forecasts on NRW
reduction based on SE’s worldwide experience of various
methods of NRW reduction strategies.
PROS
 Standardize Methodology – Based on IWA/AWWA Method
 Sound Analytical Approach to NRW Assessment and Forecasting
 Once up to speed, time-savings on analysis
 Established data to judge impact of NRW reducing tasks
 Scenarios for NRW reduction and action plan priorities
CONS
 Detailed & Comprehensive Data Required
 Standard Data often needs to be customized to meet tool input needs
 May not be ideal for smaller systems
 Relatively long “Learning Curve”
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AquaCircle Assessment Results Table
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UWNJ Apparent Loss Investigation
Theft:
 Meter Tampering – Data analysis
from AMI Van
 No Record of Service – Geocoding +
field investigations
 Illegal Use of Fire Services – Field
investigations
 Improperly Connected Irrigation
Systems
Billing Discrepancies:
 Lost Meters/RFs – Data analysis and
comparison with CC&B
 Stopped Meters
 Meter Inaccuracies
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(Summer 2012)
Results of Apparent Losses Investigations
 Meter Tampering – 2.5 %
 No Record of Service – 0.07%
 Illegal Use of Fire Services – 1.0 %
 “Lost” Meters/RFs – up to 0.4%
 Meter Inaccuracies – 3.5 to 4.0%
 Irrigation Systems – 0%
Total % of potential revenue that is not billed = 7 to 8%
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Short and Mid-Term Plan Highlights
Apparent Losses:
 Expand Apparent Losses Investigations
 Advance AMI and MDM software
 Improve Meter Age Program where applicable
Real Losses:
 Continue Enhanced Leak Detection Methods
 Create District Metering Areas
 Reduce Leak Discovery to Repair Time
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