Choice Blindness In Males & Females

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Choice Blindness In Males and
Females
Lilly Tinsley and Vanessa Shadare
Choice Blindness
• Choice blindness is a form of inattentional
blindness, a phenomenon in which people fail
to notice unexpected stimuli in the world
around them.
Hypotheses
• Null Hypothesis: There is no difference in
choice blindness between males and females.
• Alternative Hypothesis: There is a difference in
choice blindness between males and females.
Methods
• 15 male and 15 females will be test
subjects.
• Present two photos side by side
and ask the test subject to tell
which person they find more
attractive.
• Remove photos and re-present
them with either their selection or
or an alternative photo.
• Ask the subject to justify their
choice.
Methods cont.
• Repeat previous steps ten
times with each test subject
using different pairs of
faces.
• The same protocol will be
followed with various
scents instead of faces.
Analysis
• We are going to
compare results
among genders
and senses.
• Sign tests and
tests of
heterogeneity will
be employed.
Results
• After collecting data, we
confirmed that our null
hypothesis is correct
– There is no difference in
choice blindness between
males and females
– The amount of choice
blindness exhibited by males
and females is not significant,
as determined by a sign test
Sight
Same
Different
Male
21%
20%
Female
28%
34%
Smell
Same
Different
Male
24%
39%
Female
32%
29%
References
1. "Choice Blindness | Science | WIRED." Wired.com. Conde Nast
Digital, 14 Aug. 0010. Web. 25 Aug. 2014.
http://www.wired.com/2010/08/choice-blindness/
2. "Choice Blindness." Peter Johansson's Experiment and. N.p., n.d.
Web. 24 Aug. 2014.
https://explorable.com/choice-blindness
3. "Choice Blindness." - Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d.
Web. 25 Aug. 2014.
http://taggedwiki.zubiaga.org/new_content/0bf2880d3fdc5b2702fcb1
78ab208615
4. "Evaluating Choice Blindness: Do You Know What You Want?"
Education.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Aug. 2014.
http://www.education.com/science-fair/article/evaluating-choiceblindness/

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