Program Outcomes - University of Cincinnati

Report
+
Academic Program Workshop for Creating an
Assessment Plan
Facilitated by Pamela Baker, PhD, Director, CET&L
Laurah Turner, PhD, Assistant Director, CET&L
University of Cincinnati, Center for the
Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ Session Outcomes

Identify and explain to colleagues the purpose and process of
assessment.

Identify and evaluate the components of an assessment plan.

Develop a framework for the ideal graduate of your program.

Draft strong program-level learning outcomes.

Understand alignment of outcomes at the program, course, and unitlevel.

Conduct a preliminary audit of program-level assessments.

Draft a curriculum map for your program that identifies specific
courses where program learning outcomes are addressed.
Develop a plan to gather & analyze assessment data to determine
how well student learning matches expectations (with a view to
identify action to be taken based on findings).
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning

+
Session Timeline

9:00-9:15
9:15-9:30
9:30-9:45
9:45-10:05
10:05-10:45
10:45-10:55
10:55-12:00
12:00-12:30
12:30- 1:15
1:15-2:15
2:15:2:25
2:25-3:25

3:25-3:30









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
Introductions and Program Overview
Identify & Explain the Purpose of an Assessment Plan
Identify & Evaluate the Components of an Assessment Plan
Develop a framework for the Ideal Graduate
Identify Strong Program Outcomes
BREAK
Review Program Outcomes
LUNCH
Conduct a Preliminary Audit of Program Level Assessment
Draft a Curriculum Map
BREAK
Develop a plan to gather and analyze assessment data (with
a view to identify action to be taken based on findings).
Q&A
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Overview: Identify & Explain the
Purpose & Process of Assessment

What is the purpose of program assessment within the context of Semester
Conversion & Higher Ed?

What is assessment of a program?


Program Effectiveness (e.g. the program will graduate 90% of students, &
70% of those students will earn degrees within five years)

Program Outcomes (i.e. emphasis on demonstrating what students can do
as a result of completing a program)
What is the common purpose of assessment?

A tool to make meaningful improvements and appropriate interventions

A tool to ensure efficient allocation of resources

A way to highlight strengths within a curriculum

Reaccreditation
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Assessment, Continued
SHORTER TERM

Ascertain whether what our students have learned is good enough
 Identify assessment methods & measures
 Identify whether these assessment tools are assessing what it is we expect our
students to learn
 Identify whether required courses/experiences within the curriculum align with the
program level outcomes
 Determine whether our students are learning at the appropriate scope, depth, and
level
LONGER TERM

Use long-term findings to make more significant curriculum revisions (beyond simple
fine-tuning of programs)

Use assessment evidence to make informed decisions about your program within the
context of college and institutional priorities

Identify external benchmarks to evaluate the learning of our students
 Sharing evidence & best practices
Adapted from Linda Suskie, “Why Are We Assessing?,” Inside Higher Ed (October 26, 2010), adapted from her talk at the 2010 Assessment Institute. (Dr.
Suskie serves as Vice President of the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.) & Susan Hatfield, “Assessing Your Program-Level Assessment Plan,”
Idea Paper #45, The Idea Center.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Anatomy of an Assessment Plan



Program Outcomes that can be
measured, assessed, or
observed in some way
Curriculum/Program Map
connections identified
between courses and
program-level outcomes as
well as clear levels of learning
at each level (emerging,
developing, achieved)
Program Outcomes
Use of Findings
Curriculum/Program
Map
Findings
Methods/Measures
Methods/Measured
articulated, which include
direct & indirect examples of
student learning
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Assessment
Infrastructure
+
Anatomy of an Assessment Plan,
Continued

Assessment Infrastructure comprised of program faculty
charged with overseeing the execution of the assessment
plan, with efforts linked to college and institutional
assessment efforts & goals

Findings for several years explained, patterns and trends
identified (data collected & reviewed on an annual basis)

Use of Findings discussed among faculty; learning outcomes
and pedagogical strategies reviewed and revised based on
assessment data
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ ACTIVITY 1: Envisioning the Ideal
Graduate
The Task: Brainstorm the “ideal” graduate of your program. Be
sure to describe how you imagine your ideal graduates once they
become professionals in their field.

What does an “ideal” graduate of your program look like?

How will your graduates think and behave?

What are 3-4 important things your students will learn to do in your
program?

What do students in your program need to learn to prepare them for
a job?

What would you like your students to be doing consistently 5 years
from now?
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ ACTIVITY 1: Continued
 If
these category listings are not applicable to
your program, please insert alternative headings.
Thinking
Acting
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Knowledge
+
Program Outcomes

Outcomes are achieved results or consequences of what was
learned (i.e. evidence that learning took place).

Outcomes should be framed in terms of the program and not
individual courses or students.

Outcomes are student-centered and describe what a student
should be able to do or understand upon graduation.

Outcomes should describe the abilities, knowledge, values and
attitudes expected of students after completion of the program.

Outcomes must be stated in such a way that they can be
measured or observed by more than one assessment method.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ How Program Outcomes Fit Within a
Curriculum
Program
Outcomes
Represent broad
statements
incorporating areas
of inter-related
knowledge and skills
developed
throughout a
program, across
courses and
experiences.
Course
Outcomes
Represent the
measurable and
observable
knowledge, skills,
abilities, or attitudes
students should have
by the end of the
course. Course
outcomes should
align with the
program outcomes.
Unit
Outcomes
Represent the
measurable and
observable knowledge,
skills, abilities, or
attitudes students
should have by the end
of the unit. Unit
outcomes should align
with the course
outcomes.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Class
Outcomes
Represent the
knowledge, skills,
abilities, or attitudes
that students should
achieve by the end of
an individual class
session. Class
outcomes should align
with the unit outcomes.
+ How Program Outcomes Fit Within a
Curriculum
Course
Outcomes
Represent the
measurable and
observable
knowledge, skills,
abilities, or attitudes
students should have
by the end of the
course. Course
outcomes should
align with the
program outcomes.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ How Program Outcomes Fit Within a
Curriculum
Unit
Outcomes
Represent the
measurable and
observable knowledge,
skills, abilities, or
attitudes students
should have by the end
of the unit. Unit
outcomes should align
with the course
outcomes.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Class
Outcomes
Represent the
knowledge, skills,
abilities, or attitudes
that students should
achieve by the end of
an individual class
session. Class
outcomes should align
with the unit outcomes.
+
Unit & Class-Level Outcomes

Move from content covered to student action

Consider how in-class activities can model or reinforce
learning outcomes

Make course calendar more explicitly supportive of learning
outcomes
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Week of
Aug. 27—Aug. 31
Topic
First-week unit
(shorter than the
next unit)
General &
conceptual issues
about point of
view in literature
Sep. 4—Sep. 14
Question of the
reliability of a
literary narrator
Sep. 17—Sep. 26
Nov. 5—Nov. 16
Background
relevant to a
discussion of
narrative POV
Learning
Outcomes
In-class
activities
Outside of class
responsibilities
(discussion, writing,
problem-solving,
small group work,
presentations)
(reading, problem
sets, lecture
viewing)
Students will be
able to describe
three different
modes of literary
POV (basic
situation) and
identify those
modes in short
stories
Model smallgroup discussions
and apply those
models; group
reports by end of
this module; endof-class writing
(5 mins.) after
each session.
Students will be
able to assess and
describe the
reliability of a
narrator with
evidence to
explain
adequately.
Students will be
able to provide
research in
support of a
theory about the
reliability of a
story’s narrator
Pretty much the
same as above
Read short stories
by Gaskell,
Conan, Doyle &
Le Fanu. Review
podcast lecture
over Poe’s work.
Online Bb
quizzes in
advance of three
classes.
Pretty much the
same as above
Continue with
small-group
format, some inclass writing
Continue with
reading short
stories, switch to
a novel in week
five
Due next week
Reading-journal
report (due Sep.
13) on one of the
thee short stores:
how describe the
POV of that
narrarator?
First portfolio
assignment due
on Sep. 21 on
reliability of
narrator in a
chosen story
Major portfolio
assignments, also
blog postings
Upcoming major
assignment(s)
First portfolio
assignment due
on Sep. 21
(posted on Bb—
“Assignments”)
2nd portfolio
assignment due
on Oct. 3 (Bb –
“assignments)
Portfolio
continues to build
toward five major
assignments
+ How Program Outcomes Fit Within a
Curriculum
Program
Outcomes
Represent broad
statements
incorporating areas
of inter-related
knowledge and skills
developed
throughout a
program, across
courses and
experiences.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ What are Program Outcomes?
Program outcomes represent broad statements that incorporate
many areas of inter-related knowledge and skills developed over
the duration of the program through a wide range of courses and
experiences.
They represent the big picture, describe broad aspects of
behavior, and encompass multiple learning experiences.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Program Outcomes…

are achieved results or consequences of what was learned
(i.e. evidence that learning took place)

should be framed in terms of the program and not individual
courses or students

are student-centered and describe what a student should be
able to do or understand upon graduation

should describe the abilities, knowledge, values and
attitudes expected of students after completion of the
program

must be measurable or observable by more than one
assessment method
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Bloom’s Taxonomy Action Verbs
Level
Definition
KNOWLEDGE
Student recalls or
recognizes information,
ideas, and principles in
the approximate form
in which they were
learned.
COMPREHENSION
Student translates,
comprehends, or
interprets information
based on prior learning.
APPLICATION
Student selects,
transfers, and uses data
and principles to
complete a problem or
task with a minimum
of direction.
ANALYSIS
Student distinguishes,
classifies, and related
the assumptions,
hypothesis, evidence,
or structure of a
statement or question
SYNTHESIS
Student originates,
integrates, and
combines ideas into a
product, plan or
proposal that is new to
him or her
EVALUATION
Student appraises,
assesses, or critiques
on a basis of specific
standards and criteria
Sample verbs
Sample behaviors
arrange
define
describe
duplicate
identify
label
list
match
memorize
name
order
outline
recognize
relate
recall
repeat
reproduce
select
state
explain
summarize
paraphrase
describe
illustrate
classify
express
extend
generalize
give examples(s)
identify
indicate
infer
locate
paraphrase
predict
recognize
rewrite
review
select
summarize
translate
employ
illustrate
interpret
manipulate
modify
operate
practice
predict
prepare
produce
relate
schedule
show
sketch
solve
use
write
analyze
categorize
compare
contrast
separate
apply
create
design
hypothesize
invent
develop
arrange
assemble
convert
defend
describe
discuss
distinguish
estimate
explain
apply
change
choose
compute
demonstrate
discover
dramatize
change
discover
choose
compute
demonstrate
dramatize
categorize
collect
combine
comply
compose
construct
create
employ
illustrate
interpret
manipulate
modify
operate
design
develop
devise
explain
formulate
generate
plan
practice
predict
prepare
produce
relate
schedule
prepare
rearrange
reconstruct
relate
reorganize
revise
show
sketch
solve
use
write
judge
recommend
critique
justify
appraise
argue
assess
attach
choose
compare
conclude
contrast
defend
describe
discriminate
estimate
evaluate
explain
justify
interpret
relate
predict
value
rate
select
summarize
support
use
compute
solve
demonstrate
apply
construct
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
rewrite
set up
summarize
synthesize
tell
write
The student will define
the 6 levels of
Bloom’s taxonomy of
the cognitive domain.
The student will
explain the purpose of
Bloom’s taxonomy of
the cognitive domain.
The student will write
an instructional
objective for each
level of Bloom’s
taxonomy.
The student will
compare and contrast
the cognitive and
affective domains.
The student will
design a classification
scheme for writing
educational objectives
that combines the
cognitive, affective,
and psychomotor
domains.
The student will judge
the effectiveness of
writing objectives
using Bloom’s
taxonomy.
+
Program Outcomes, Examples:
Undergraduate

Examples:

Too generic: Students completing the Engineering program will be
practiced in design skills.

Specific/Assessable: Engineering graduates will demonstrate
knowledge of math, science, and engineering fundamentals.
Specifically, the student will have the ability to:
•
Demonstrate general design principles.
•
Use fundamental engineering techniques, skills and tools for
engineering practice.
•
Analyze and interpret data to produce meaningful conclusions
and recommendations.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ Program Outcomes: Undergraduate
Bachelor Degree in Business (BBA) Upon
completion of the BBA Program, students will be
able to:
1.
Apply functional and cross-functional knowledge to critically assess
business problems
2.
Use analyses to inform and develop integrative solutions that improve
business outcomes
3.
Express ideas clearly, logically and persuasively in both oral and
written formats
4.
Recognize ethical and social responsibility issues in a business
environment and know how to apply a process of ethical inquiry
5.
Show how operating in a global market creates business opportunities
and challenges
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Program Outcomes: Undergraduate
Bachelor Degree in Health Science (HLSC):
Upon completion of the HLSC Program,
students will be able to:
1.
Plan, execute, evaluate, adjust physical activities and programs appropriate
for self and clients
2.
Provide complete, understandable and accurate information within content
areas to clients and community
3.
Develop and/or disseminate scientific information to the general public and
the academic community
4.
Apply information from various basic and applied science disciplines in a
manner that provides for efficient, effective and safe physical activities
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Program Level Outcomes Categories
for Graduate Level

Need to be progressively more advanced in academic content

Need to address discipline knowledge and research or
professional practice

Need to address technology skill development (if appropriate)

Need to be informed & aligned with professional organization
standards, licensing bodies, or specialized accreditors

Professional development of graduate students
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Example Student Learning
Outcomes at the Graduate Level
BEFORE:

Develop knowledge across the subdisciplines of physics
beyond that expected for a baccalaureate degree in physics.

Develop expertise in an area of physics that is appropriate to
the doctoral level.

Develop and demonstrate the ability to carry through a
substantial research project, with independent intellectual
contributions to the conduct and direction of the research.
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Example Student Learning
Outcomes at the Graduate Level
AFTER:
Upon completion of the physics PhD program, students will be able to:

identify and describe the broad fundamental concepts of physics;

analyze physics problems using fundamental physics concepts and appropriate mathematical
models;

solve physics problems using analytic, computational, observational, or experimental
methods;

present clearly organized oral explanations of physics topics at a level appropriate to the
audience at hand;

explain and analyze at an expert level the concepts and the state of current research in a
subfield of physics;

compose and defend written presentations of physics research in a format and at a level
appropriate for journal publication;

conceptualize, design, and implement new approaches for solving research problems in
physics, including analytic, computational, observational, and experimental methods, as
appropriate.
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Example Student Learning
Outcomes at the Graduate Level

Professional Development

Ethics
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Activity 2: Define Student Learning
Outcomes

Focused on the learner, rather than on the content covered

Attainable, rather than aspirational

Describe observable and demonstrable skills and
knowledge

Reflect how the learner will use course content now and in
the future

Indicate specific and measurable elements that will be
assessed using multiple assessment methods

Identify in the curriculum where the PO will be introduced,
developed and achieved
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
ACTIVITY 2b: Peer Review of Program
Outcomes

Gallery Walk
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ Program Outcomes and Your Program
Assessment Plan

PO’s are the foundation of an assessment plan
Program Outcomes
Program Outcomes
Course Outcomes
Curriculum/Program
Map
Use of Findings
The Process
of Assessment
Findings
Methods/Measures
Assessment
Infrastructure
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Unit Outcomes
Class Outcomes
+
Activity 3: Curriculum Mapping
Matrix

To identify where key learning outcomes are addressed in
the curriculum

To identify whether courses are aligned with the curriculum

Specifically, to determine/identify whether course-level student
learning outcomes align with program-level outcomes

Note: You’ve already completed the process of mapping coursespecific student learning outcomes to program outcomes, when
you completed the P-1.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Activity 3: Continued
Instructions

List the program learning outcomes identified in the P-1 in the
column labeled “Program Learning Outcomes.”

List the required courses and experiences identified in the P-1
across the top row.
NOTE: Do not list courses or experiences controlled by
external academic units. Only list courses and experiences that
are controlled by your program. If you identify a program
outcome, you must be able to assess it.

Identify which course(s) and/or experiences utilize each program
learning outcome and at what level the program learning
outcome is addressed (e.g. emerging, developing, achieved)
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Curriculum Mapping Matrix: Linking Program Outcomes to Curriculum
Key
Required Courses and Experiences Identified in P-1
E: Emerging
D: Developing
A101 A202 A502 ….
…
…
A: Achieved
OUTCOMES
1 Outcome 1
2 Outcome 2
3 Outcome 3
E
D
E
A
D
EDA
4
5
6
7
8
9
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
A
Key
E = Emerging
D = Developing
A = Achieved
Program Learning Outcomes
ANTH
1003 (Intro
to Cult)
E, D, A
PLO 1: describe and discuss
topics related to the four
subfields of Anthropology
(Biological, Cultural,
Archaeology, and Linguistics)
and to articulate approaches
and issues associated with
each.
Required Courses and Experiences Identified in P-1
ANTH
ANTH 1007
ANTH 1009
Methods
4000+ plus
1005 (Intro (Intro to Arch) (Intro to Ling) (students
(students
to Bio)
choose 1
choose 1)
from list)
E, D, A
E, D, A
Capstone
E, D, A
PLO 2: Articulate the
E
E
E
E
relevance of Anthropology in
an increasingly globalized
society
PLO 3: recognize and reflect
E
E
E
E
on ethical and historical
issues in anthropology and
archaeology.
PLO 4: critically evaluate
primary sources in
anthropological literature
using written and oral
communication.
PLO 5: apply theoretical and
methodological knowledge in
field and laboratory context by
collecting, organizing,
analyzing, and interpreting
qualitative and quantitative
data.
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
D
D, A
D, A
D, A
A
E, D, A
E, D, A
D, A
E, D, A
E, D, A
D, A
+ Identify & Describe Corresponding Program
Outcomes & Assessment Methods: Conduct a
Preliminary Audit
Circle any of the measures used in
your academic program
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Why Not Just Use Course
Grades?
+ Why aren’t course grades adequate
indicators for program assessment?

Course letter grades are insufficient for program assessment
because:

Letter grades are nominal values reflecting a summary of a
student’s performance.

Grades are not an exact measurement of what students have and
have not learned.

Grades do not measure achievement of program outcomes,
learning of specific skills, or the capacity of the curriculum to
achieve program outcomes.
+
Example: Outcomes for an
Undergraduate Economics Program

Students should be able to identify, explain, and use economic
concepts, theories, models; and data-analytic techniques.

Students should be able to deliver effective presentations in
which they combine visual communication design with oral
arguments and/or the written word.

Students should use investigative skills necessary for
conducting original economic research and participating
effectively in project teams.

Students should be able to apply their economic tools to
formulate positions on a wide range of social and economic
problems and engage effectively in policy debates.
+
Example Curriculum Map for an
Undergraduate Economics Program
E10
1
E202
E30
3
1. Students should be able to identify, explain, and use
economic concepts, theories, models; and data-analytic
techniques
E
D
A
2. Students should be able to deliver effective
presentations in which they combine visual
communication design with oral arguments and/or the
written word.
E
D
A
3. Students should use investigative skills necessary for
conducting original economic research and participating
effectively in project teams.
E
D
4. Students should be able to apply their economic tools
to formulate positions on a wide range of social and
economic problems and engage effectively in policy
debates
ED
E404
A
DA
+Letter grades are nominal values
reflecting a summary of a student’s
performance
Measurements of
Learning in E303
Grade
Points Possible
Exam
Assignment
Quiz
Oral Presentation
78
18
10
98
100
20
50
100
Exam
Attendance
88
10
100
20
302
77%
390
C
Total
Course Grade:
1. Students should be able to identify, explain, and use
+ PO
economic concepts, theories, models; and data-analytic
techniques
PO 2. Students should be able to deliver effective presentations
in which they combine visual communication design with oral
arguments and/or the written word.
Measurements of
Learning in E303
Grade
Points
Possible
PO 1
PO 2
Exam
70
100
Assignment
15
20
Quiz
10
50
Oral Presentation
98
100
Exam
82
100
Attendance
10
20
Total
285
390
167/220
98/100
Course Grade:
73%
C
76%
98%
2: Students should be able to deliver effective
+ PO
presentations in which they combine visual
communication design with oral arguments and/or the
written word.
Measurement
s of Learning
in E303
Student
1
Student Points
2
Possible
Exam
70
70
100
Assignment
15
12
20
Quiz
10
40
50
Oral
Presentation
98
50
100
Exam
82
98
100
Attendance
10
15
20
Total
285
285
390
Course Grade:
73%
73%
C

The oral presentation
assignment is worth 25%
of the course grade.

It is possible for one
student to get an
exceptional grade on that
assignment, and another
to fail, with both students
receiving a “C” for the
final course grade.

The OVERALL course
grade does not measure:


students’ demonstrated
oral presentation skills
the capacity of the
curriculum to achieve PO2
+
Why aren’t course grades adequate
indicators for program assessment?

Course letter grades are insufficient for program assessment
because:

Grades reflect the evaluation practices, policies, and criteria of
individual instructors.

Faculty teaching the same course may teach different material.

Faculty teaching the same course may emphasize different course
outcomes.
+ Grades reflect the evaluation practices,
policies, and criteria of individual
instructors
Instructor 2
Instructor 1
Measurements of
Learning in E303
Points
Possible
Measurements of
Learning in E303
Points
Possible
Exam
100
Exam
100
Assignment
20
Assignment
20
Quiz
50
Quiz
50
Oral Presentation
100
Oral Presentation
100
Exam
100
Exam
100
Participation
20
Attendance
20
Total
390
Participation
20
Quiz
50
Total
460
Difference of 70 points between
two sections of the same course!
+
Why aren’t course grades adequate
indicators for program assessment?

Course letter grades are insufficient for program assessment
because:






Letter grades are nominal values reflecting a summary of a
student’s performance.
Grades are not an exact measurement of what students have and
have not learned.
Grades do not measure achievement Program outcomes, learning
of specific skills or the capacity of the curriculum to achieve PO2
Grades reflect the evaluation practices, policies, and criteria of
individual instructors.
Faculty teaching the same course may teach different material.
Faculty teaching the same course may emphasize different course
outcomes.
+
What CAN Be Used for Assessment?


Specific grades that reflect a specific program outcome

An exam

Assignment

Oral presentation
Then the corresponding scores can be used to represent
students' learning achievement on the program outcome,
which can serve as data for program assessment.
+ Conditions for Using Course Products
as Assessment Measures:
1.
All sections of the required course must produce the course
product (e.g. an oral presentation)
2.
Faculty must agree on product structure (e.g. directions,
requirements)
3.
Faculty must agree on how the products should be evaluated:


Minimum performance standards
Rubric
Average Grade on Standard Oral
Presentation
100
50
0
77
80
71
88
69
75
85
77
Average
Program Score:
78/100
+
Final Message
Course products (cases, papers, presentations, exercises) may be used as
program assessment measures, but course grades, by themselves, cannot.
+ Activity 4: Conduct a Preliminary Audit of
Assessment Methods Utilized in Your
Program

Using the “Program Assessment Inventory” (also available on
the CET&L Website), read through the assessment measures
and their associated descriptions. Check off any of the
measures currently used in your academic program.
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Activity 5: Complete the
Assessment Measures Alignment
Matrix
Program
Outcome
Assessment Tool and
stage (E, D, A) of
assessment)
Course(s) where
assessment
occurs
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Timeline
Person
Responsible/
Committee
+
Example Assessment Measures
Alignment Matrix
Program Outcome
Assessment Tool and
stage (E, D, A) of
assessment)
Describe and
critically discuss
topics related to
the four subfields
of Anthropology
(Cultural
Anthropology,
Biological
Anthropology,
Archaeology, and
Linguistics) and to
articulate
approaches and
issues associated
with each.
·
·
A standard
assignment (unique
to each of the four
courses) will be
given each time the
course is taught to
assess at the “E”
and “D” stages.
A standard set of
questions (unique
to each of the four
courses) will be
included on the final
exam to assess at
the “A” stage
Course(s)
where
assessment
occurs
ANTH 1003 (E,
D, A), ANTH
1005 (E, D, A),
ANTH 1007 (E,
D, A),
ANTH 1009 (E,
D, A)*
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
Timeline
Person
Responsible/
Committee
·
Members of
the Curriculum
Committee,
Program
Coordinator
·
·
Every
term
Annual
summary
to inform
changes
for
upcomin
g
academic
year
Major
changes
every 4-5
years
+
Activity 5: Complete the
Assessment Measures Alignment
Matrix
1.
2.
3.
4.
List your revised program learning outcomes in Assessment
Measures Alignment Matrix on the following page in the
column labeled “Program Learning Outcomes”.
Using the Program assessment measures identified in the
previous step, match the assessment tool to the Program
outcome (please note that that same assessment may be used
for multiple program outcomes).
Enter these in the table on the following page under the
column labeled “Assessment Methods” and next to the
program outcome to which they apply.
For each assessment measure listed describe in the adjacent
columns where (what courses), when/how often the data will
be collected (timeline), and who is responsible for collecting,
reviewing and making recommendations about the data.
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ Activity 6: Developing Your
Assessment Infrastructure

Assessment Personnel

Who will chair/serve on the assessment committee?

What is the responsibility of the committee?



Collecting data, submission process and form

Review of data (recommended annually)

Recommendation of findings and decimation/discussion of findings/recommendations

Collection of course syllabus/discussion with individual faculty regarding required courses in the
curriculum
Recognition of service-load
Assessment Schedule

How often will data be collected

When will faculty be reminded that data will be collected (recommended beginning of term)

Remind faculty to submit data at end of term

Schedule of data compilation, summary and review by PC

Timeline for when these findings with be shared & discussed with department faculty

Follow-up discussion with faculty teaching required courses and/or overseeing required experiences

Timeline for improvement strategies identified (both short and long-term)
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+ Looking Forward: An Example
Implementation of an Assessment
Plan
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+

Homework: Revise your plan to gather,
analyze, and interpret assessment data
Complete the “Academic Program Assessment
Template,” using the following resources:

Program outcomes

Curriculum mapping matrix

Assessment Measures Alignment Matrix

Developing your assessment infrastructure
University of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning
+
Tomorrow
 Activity
7: Peer evaluation of drafted program
assessment plan
Universtiy of Cincinnati, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching & Learning

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