6.2 HRBA to Monitoring (short)

Report
A Human Rights-Based Approach
to Monitoring
Session 6 (cont.)
Monitoring vs. Evaluation
Monitoring
Evaluation
Systematic, ongoing

Systematic, periodic
During programme implementation

During and after programme
implementation
Tracking of activities and progress

Judgement of merit, value or worth of
a programme/project
According to AWP

Compared to evaluation criteria
(relevance, effectiveness, impact)
For short term corrective action

For decision-making about future
programmes
Accountability for implementation

Accountability for results
Contributes to evaluation

For office & organizational learning
Conducted by insiders

Conducted by impartial outsiders
Are we doing things right?

Did we do the right things?
A Human Rights Based Approach
to Monitoring
• Monitoring that is sensitive to human rights applies the
human rights principles and standards to inform and
strengthen…
– Results and indicators
– Processes (both development processes and processes for monitoring
and reporting)
• It asks some fundamental questions
– What to measure?
– Who to involve?
– How to measure?
What to Measure?
• Ideally:
– Results
Outputs
Outcomes
Impacts (often tied to National monitoring systems for the
National Plans, PRSs, and MDGs)
– Mechanisms and processes for programme
implementation, monitoring and reporting
Who to Involve?
• Another way of thinking about how to apply
principles of ‘participation and inclusion’ to M&E
process
• A HRBA
– Ensures that both rights-holders and duty-bearers are
involved in M&E
– Will pay special attention to measures that include
vulnerable groups
How to Measure?
• Human rights principles and standards guide the
selection of indicators and the development of
monitoring and reporting systems
• Indicators should be chosen that:
– Capture the extent to which human rights principles have
been incorporated into all stages of the programme
– Demonstrate how incorporating human rights standards
has contributed to overall programme effectiveness (need
practical example of this)
• Processes must be non-discriminatory, participatory
and accountable
– Be wary of “elite capture”
What is an indicator?
A tool to measure evidence of progress towards
a result or that a result has been achieved
Indicators
 Indicators describe how the intended results will
be measured - accountability
 Objectively verifiable measures of a particular
condition
 They force clarification of what is meant by the
result
 like the “fine print” of an agreement
 Must be accompanied by baselines and targets
Baseline, Target and Achievement
Performance
Commitment
Planned
Level of
Achievement
Current
Level of
Achievement
Achievement
At end of period
Types of Indicators
Quantitative statistical
measures:
• Number of
• Frequency of
• % of
• Ratio of
• Variance with
Qualitative judgments or
perceptions:
• Alignment with
• Presence of
• Quality of
• Extent of
• Level of
Example: Indicators, Baseline, Target
and Source of Data
Outcome:
By 2007, more
girls in Belem
Province enjoy a
quality, basic
education
Output:
800 teachers in
Belem Province
can deliver the
new curriculum
effectively
Indicator:
Net enrolment
ratio
(M; F)
Baseline: F:45%
Target: F: 75%
- Improvement in
school test scores
Indicator:
# Teachers with new
certification
Baseline: 0
Target: 800
-Teacher proficiency
reports
-Improvement of school
satisfaction ratings
Source of Data
-MICS (survey)
-Annual school
test scores
report
Source of Data:
- MECYS EMIS
-School
satisfaction
surveys
HRBA and indicator development
• Inclusiveness: Do your indicators capture the experience
of vulnerable and marginalised groups? Can your
indicators be disaggregated?
• Ownership: Have RHs and DBs contributed to the
development of the indicators? Do they have confidence
in the indicators chosen?
• Clarity: Are they clear and understandable to all audiences,
including vulnerable and marginalised groups?
Group Work (30 m)
In Groups…
• Develop 2 indicators for each outcome and
contributing output
• Add to your results framework…
Outcome
Output
Indicators
Indicators
Output
Indicators
Group Work (15 m)
In Groups…
• Choose 1 principle from…
– Equality and non-discrimination
– Participation and inclusion
– Accountability and rule of law
• Make up to 3 changes in your results framework
(results and indicators) to reflect the principle
• Be ready to present in plenary…
Human Rights Principles
• Universality and
inalienability
• Indivisibility
• Interdependence and Interrelatedness
• Equality and nondiscrimination
• Participation and inclusion
• Accountability and rule of
law
Gallery
Your opportunity to “visit” other groups and give feedback
Reflect on…
– The logical flow of results and use of change language
– The SMART-ness of the framework, particularly the formulation of indicators,
assumptions and risks
– The linkage between the results framework and the human rights-based analysis.
 Is it intuitive?
 Do the results respond to the underlying and root problems revealed by the
analysis?
 Do the outcomes show changes in the performance of rights-holder to claim
their rights, duty-bearers to meet their obligations?
 Do the outputs address identified capacity gaps?
!! Remember - leave comments behind on post-it notes.

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