File

Report
TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S
WELCOME ................................................................................................... 3
TYPES OF JET POSITIONS ....................................................................... 3
WHERE AM I ? ............................................................................................. 4
GIFU CLIMATE ............................................................................................. 5
WHERE IS EVERYONE ELSE ?................................................................... 6
HINTS AND IDEAS FOR PACKING.............................................................. 7
THE FIRST MONTH ..................................................................................... 9
FIRST FIVE DAYS .................................................................................... 10
HOW MUCH CASH DO I NEED ? ...............................................................11
CELL PHONES .......................................................................................... 11
YOUR SUPPORT SYSTEM ........................................................................ 12
PAS (PREFECTURAL ADVISORS AND PROFILES)................................. 13
RPAS (REGIONAL PREFECTURAL ADVISORS) ..................................... 15
SEINO ..................................................................................................... 16
CHUNO ................................................................................................... 17
GIFU ......................................................................................................... 18
HIDA ......................................................................................................... 19
TONO ....................................................................................................... 20
COMMUNICATING WITH YOUR PREDECESSOR .................................... 21
YOUR APARTMENT ................................................................................... 22
PLANNING TO DRIVE IN JAPAN? ............................................................ 23
RESOURCES FOR GIFU JETS .................................................................. 24
Welcome to Japan!
First time abroad? First time in Japan? 100th time in Japan?
Whichever the case, no matter what your motivation, the experiences
you have in Gifu Prefecture are an important step in your personal and
professional development. You have chosen to spend this chapter of
your life in Gifu, assisting the local community in international relations
and english language instruction. Gifu is sure to give back plenty as a
token of appreciation.
The JET Programme aims to reach the smaller communities. Gifu is no
metropolis. We hope you will enjoy the slower pace of life here and look
forward to hearing all about your new experiences at the various
conferences and social gatherings throughout the year!
Throughout this guide, you will find references to the JET
Programme General Information Handbook (GIH).
The GIH is your bible whilst on the programme, please
ensure it comes with you to Japan.
Types of JET positions – which am I?
Senior High School ALT
Senior High School ALTs are placed at one high school, and teach 5 days a week there.
You are employed by Gifu Prefecture which is your Contracting Organization (CO).
Your base school is your Host Institution. Your supervisor is likely a JTE (Japanese
Teacher of English), with whom you will have a lot of direct contact.
City, Town, or Village (Municipal) Board of Education ALT
Hired by the Board of Education (BOE) in your city, town, or village, and your
paycheck will come directly from that entity. You will spend most of your time based in
a junior high school and may make visits to other schools in the area. You may spend a
day or two at an elementary school. You may also teach adult night classes. Your
supervisor will likely be a local BOE Worker, overseeing more than one ALT.
Coordinator of International Relations
You will be be contracted to the Gifu Prefectural Office but work at the Gifu
International Centre in the middle of Gifu City. There you will engage in efforts to help
local residents (regardless of country of origin) live together and learn about each others
cultures and traditions.
Where art thou in the grand scheme of things?
高山市
HIDA
GIFU
SEINO
CHUNO
岐阜市
TONO
Weather
Gifu has very distinct seasons. It is hot and humid in the summer and very
cold in the winter. Autumn and Spring are certainly the most comfortable
although they are very short. JET participants in GIFU feel the extremes, given
that they work in a public institution that promotes energy-saving practices. The
below charts show how quickly the temperatures drop from October. It is near
impossible to pack enough clothing in your single suitcase to keep warm for an
entire Gifu winter. We recommend you compromise fashion for clothing that is
thermal and thick.
Mid summer (July, August) brings heavy rainfall, sometimes leading to strong
typhoons and flooding in Gifu. You are likely to spend the first few months
sweating profusely while searching frantically for your raincoat or umbrella
(almost all Japanese people carry umbrellas in the rain). Japanese offices are
reluctant to turn on air conditioners given efforts to save electricity (setsuden),
so bring clothing that will be comfortable to wear all day. For those of you riding
a bicycle to work, holding an umbrella in one hand is technically illegal (see the
Gifu Jets blog for bicycle rules). We strongly recommend you bring light, good
breathing material (cotton) for this rainy season.
Where’s everyone else in Gifu?
Just what you need – a map showing where all the other
JETS are located around the prefecture!
Considerations for packing luggage
Clothes:
Japanese sizes are generally smaller. Men’s clothing is made for slim bodies especially
pants. Women's clothing usually goes up to about a UK/AUS size10-12, or US size 8. If you
are above 165cm (5ft. 6in), pants may be too short.
•Do not go on a buying spree for formal workwear, as you most likely won't need it.
Business casual is fine.
•Bring one or two dark suits for formal work occasions like graduation and conferences.
Black is best. For female ALTs, suited events are minimal. If you wear a skirt suit, the skirt
should be below the knee.
•If you wear skirts in summer, you should wear pantyhose. Please be aware that
sleeveless tops such as tank tops are not acceptable in Japanese workplaces. As long as
whatever you wear has some kind of sleeve, and it is not low cut in the neckline, you
should be ok. Bring plenty of shorts and T-shirts.
•When wearing in skirts or dresses, we recommend bike shorts or leggings to wear
underneath (wind).
•For outdoor school events like sports day, you may be expected to wear a tracksuit.
•Unpadded bras are hard to find in Japan, and sizes are small.
Shoes:
You will need shoes specifically for inside the school (e.g. rubber-soled shoes, slippers).
Also, if you go to the gym, you will need a pair of indoor sport shoes, and these again
should not be worn outside. There will no doubt be a time to wear waterproof shoes,
hiking boots, sandals, formal shoes. Sizes in Japan are smaller: Women's up to 24.5 cm
(about US size 8), and men's are generally up to 27.5 cm.
Personal Items and Toiletries:
If you plan to bring a lot of extra supplies, have some sent over with your winter clothes
to make your luggage lighter. Almost everything is available here, but if you habitually
use a product, or just cannot live without your special brand of organic soap, we
recommend that you bring it. Suggestions:
•Hard to find or expensive items are good anti-perspirant deodorants, toothpaste with
fluoride, larger-sized toothbrushes, dental floss, make-up (shades differ to back home),
and skin-care products.
•Tampons are not as common as sanitary pads. The selection of tampons is very limited
expensive, and occasionally there are some stores that don’t carry them.
Considerations for packing luggage
(continued)
•Bring your own hair color if you dye your hair, it will be much easier to follow the
directions!
•Contact lenses are very popular here and readily available everywhere – you will
probably need to have an eye examination the first time but this is subsidised by the
national health insurance scheme.
•Birth control pills are available here, however more expensive and not covered by
general health insurance. If you do decide to bring them, be aware of medication
quantity restrictions (e.g. 1 month supply) upon entry into Japan. Condoms are
generally smaller-fitting in Japan.
Medicine: GIH 25 Check what is allowed well in advance of embarkation
Headache tablets, motion-sickness tablets, sunscreen, insect bite lotion, and cold and
flu tablets are good to bring. Be careful with the limits you bring or send. Information on
prescription medicine is shown on p. 27.
Documents:
•Extra passport photos 4x3cm
Do-it-yourself photo booths are readily found around town in Japan.
•Original and copies of your emergency contacts at home, credit cards, driver license
(CHECK PAGE 21 of this guide), international driver license, bank account details,
personal loans, statement of earnings and tax for the year, student loans, birth
certificate, passport, visa.
Other items:
•A backup copy (memory stick, CD-R, or external hard drive) of important files and
software.
•Alternative teaching resources (inc. TEFL) to the Japanese textbook including games !
•Lots of pictures or videos of friends, family, famous people, souvenirs, documentaries
Schedule for the first month
Monday July 28th ~ Wednesday July 30th
Monday August 4th – Wednesday August 6th
Despite the formalities and suits, this is a very relaxed two
days. Mid way through, you will meet some of Gifu’s
Prefectural Advisors, who will welcome and escort you all
the way down to Gifu to commence your in-prefecture
orientation!
Group A
Wednesday, July 30t & Thursday, July 31st
Group B
Wednesday August 6th & Thursday, August 7th
Fresh off the bullet train from Tokyo, we will take a short
(read: no) rest before launching into the Gifu life-specific
orientation programme. Two half days of useful
information, after which your Supervisor will come to pick
you up. Relax, absorb the information and enjoy the
(hopefully) witty Regional Welcome Videos that our RPA
(Regional Prefectural Advisors) have filmed just for you !
You will have ample time to read materials in detail before
the school term starts. These few weeks may seem like a
slow start to your new life, however remain patient and
prepare a lot of classroom material while getting to know
the people and procedures of your school (s).
Tuesday, August 19th & Wednesday August 20th
(Groups A and B)
After a few weeks of settling in at home and work, we’ll
be seeing you all again at the mid-August Gifu Work
Orientation! We have a lot of great workshops planned
for helping you get adjusted to
working in Japan and Gifu.
What to pack for the first 5 days
Boarding plane for Japan
Group A
Group B
July 27 / 28
Aug 3 / 4
TO
Access to luggage in Gifu
Group A
Group B
Aug 1 PM
Aug 8 PM
Sunday (afternoon in Tokyo)
Smart casual attire to change into after the flight
Monday (Tokyo):
Formal attire for official Orientation (this is your first paid day of work)
Possible change of clothes for dinner & drinks
Tuesday(Tokyo) Formal attire for official Tokyo Orientation
Possible change of clothes for dinner & drinks
Wednesday (Transit to Gifu and Life Orientation Day 1)
The Wednesday of Life Orientation will require smart casual wear (Approx 4
hours transit)
Thursday (Gifu) AM
Formal attire to meet your new boss / workplace
Note: You would be wise to send your large suitcase from Narita Airport
(Tokyo) upon arrival. Please note freight cost is to be borne by the JET. Minimize
and rearrange your luggage to take only the necessary with you (a small bag
and a suit cover would be ideal).You will not see this suitcase again until the
following Thursday at your new workplace.
Once you arrive at the Keio Plaza hotel in Tokyo for Orientation, you may elect
to send further luggage to your destination in Japan (at your own cost). It could
be a good idea to send dirty clothing worn in Tokyo in order to minimize the
volume you will be carrying on the 4 hour road trip to Gifu. Given the heat in
summer, you will not be able to wear the same shirt two days in a row and get
away with it !!!
Other things you will need: The JET 2014 General Information Handbook
(white/purple), this Welcome to Gifu Guide, universal adaptors for electronics,
plenty of enthusiasm and a great BOW !
How much cash do I need to bring to Japan?
(Refer to GIH21)
CLAIR and the Gifu PA s estimate that you will be needing a total of 250,000
yen to last you until your first pay day – around late August. Of course, you do
not need to bring this much in cash alone. This amount may sound large,
however depending on your situation, you may be required to pay a bond for a
private apartment, or elect to install the internet / purchase a state-of-the-art
cell phone at an upfront cost within your first few weeks. NOTE: You are also
obligated to pay for the train ride from Tokyo to Gifu and for your stay in the
hotel in Shinjuku. This money is later reimbursed to you but could take a
month to come through. This is a VERY ROUGH estimate, so please check
finer details with your contractural organization before you come.
You will find that your credit card could be extremely useful during this period.
We do not recommend travellers cheques, as it can be very difficult to find a
bank able to exchange them for cash. By far the best payment method for just
about anything in Japan is CASH NOTES. Keep your money concealed and in a
safe at a hotel, and you are very unlikely to have it stolen.
TOTAL (to bring in cash)
150,000
TOTAL (cash and card)
300,000
Getting a cell phone
(Refer to GIH 139)
Visit a cell phone dealer with your Residency Card.
Here, you will fill in a registration form and sign up 24 months. For direct debit
payment, take your bank book and inkan (personal stamp) with you.
The three carrier options
SOFTBANK ~ most popular among JETs and cheapest
AU ~ very good coverage, less popular, slightly more expensive than Softbank
DOCOMO ~ excellent coverage that you will pay for. Most popular of all
networks
Companies generally ask for you to sign 2 year contracts. They will require a
cancellation fee if you leave after a single year.
Who can support me in Gifu?
There are Prefectural Advisors (PAs) in every prefecture in Japan and their job is to be at the
center of the support network that has been created to help JETs settle into their new
lifestyles and also to help them with any problems that arise during their time on the JET
Program. In Gifu Prefecture there are 4 PAs (two non-Japanese and two Japanese PAs), and
they are all located in Gifu City. There are over 60 JETs placed all over Gifu Prefecture
however, which means that it is difficult for the PAs to maintain close contact with all of
them directly. For this reason, the Regional Prefectural Advisor (RPA) system was created to
make sure that there are Advisors in each of the five geographical regions of Gifu Prefecture
– Gifu, Seino, Chuno, Hida and Tono. The RPAs are experienced JETs and motivated to give
you advice to help you settle in. The RPAs organize welcome events in their respective
region at the beginning of the JET year (please ask the Seino RPAs about their legendary
event welcome event last year), and will organize a Regional Guide to be handed to you at
Life Orientation.
Prefectural Advisors (PA)
Can be contacted at: [email protected]
Please save this address in your email address book as you will be sure to use it during
your time on JET.
Introducing your
Prefectural Advisors
SHANE FORDE (CIR – PA)
GIFU PREFECTURE,
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS SECTION
JASON WALTERS (ALT – PA)
GIFU PREFECTURAL BOARD OF
EDUCATION
(Finishing up on JET July 2014)
渡辺 慎一 (Watanabe Shinichi)
Gifu Prefecture,
International Affairs Section
遠藤 正人 (Endo, Masato)
Gifu Prefectural Board of Education
Watanabe Shinichi (1st year JPA – International Affairs Section)
Hello everyone! My name is Watanabe and I am a first year Japanese PA.
Congratulations on being accepted to the JET programme.
More than this I am happy that you have have been placed in Gifu Prefecture, the centre
of Japan. Gifu is rich in nature and full of mountains and rivers. I like to go mountain
stream fishing and I often find myself thinking of the beauty of Gifu’s nature while fishing
on the weekends. While blessed with beautiful natural scenery Gifu is also close to the
metropolis of Nagoya and therefore is a great place to live regardless of your preference.
I hope that all of you will be able to engage with the local people in your areas, raised in
Gifu and deepen international understanding across the prefecture.
Shane Forde (1st year CIR PA – International Affairs Section)
Welcome to Gifu Prefecture, the heart of Japan and the land of clear waters .
A placement in Gifu has a lot of great advantages. In the Southern region of the prefecture
lie the suburbs of Nagoya, with cheap and quick access to Japan’s third/fourth largest city.
In the north, the Hida region offers you the traditional culture of Takayama, the even
traditionalererer.. Shirkawa go and the ski slopes of the Japanese Alps. In between the two ,
the beautiful scenery and landscape is like nothing I had ever seen before getting here. .
Whatever you are into you are sure to find something in Gifu to enjoy and for the times
when you need a kick-start or just someone to scream at about ATMs or Mukade (if you
don’t know what it is you might not want to look it up) myself and the other PAs will be more
than happy to assist you. See you in a few short weeks!
Jason Walters (2nd year ALT PA - Gifu Prefectural Board of Education) (5th year ALT)
Ahoy, all! I‘m Jason Walters from the grand US state of Colorado, about to finish my 5th and final year
in Gifu prefecture. I taught high school for three years in Gero City, and I’m currently splitting my time
between teaching at Gifu Sogo Gakuen High School in Gifu City and keeping a motherly vigil over the
ALTs of Gifu at the prefectural Board of Education office. The Gifu ALTs look forward to welcoming you
all to the area- road trips, endless karaoke, cultural marvels and mishaps, Japanese beer, astoundingly
tasty food, and natural wonders are all in your near future! I'm available day or night to answer
questions about living and working in Japan (or possibly just to enjoy an adult beverage or
three). Cheers, and welcome!
My time on JET is unfortunately just about finished, and you'll meet my successor, the amazing Tammy
Lin, when you arrive. However, I will be staying in the Gifu/Nagoya area, and I'm sure to see most of
you around !
Endo Masato (3rd year JPA – Gifu Prefectural Board of Education)
Hajimemashite! (Nice to meet you!) And you can say same Japanese words, Hajimemashite! (Nice to
meet you, too!) I’m ENDOU Masato, one of the Japanese PAs. I‘m at the Gifu Prefectural Board of
Education. Gifu Prefecture’s population has two million. We have beautiful mountains, forests, rivers,
many historical towns, and good food, especially nice people all around Gifu. You are one of the luckiest
ALT to come to Gifu!
I have been looking forward to seeing you. Thank you for coming to Gifu and we want your enthusiasm for
teaching English and multi cultural understanding in Gifu. Students have been waiting for you, and your
teaching skills and rich experiences will make them happy.
I have two daughters, 10 and 5 years old, and they like learning English. We lived in New Zealand a few
years ago, and we had a good time there. Living and working in a foreign country is exciting and brings us
good experiences, but sometimes may be difficult to live or feel lonely. But don’t think you are alone.
We can help you. Have a nice life in Gifu.
J
O
E
L
A
N
ADAM
JILL
TOM
DEREK
KELLY
BRANDON
TAMMY
JEMINA
JULIE
Your RPA Team
SIMON
JASMINE
Hi all
The name is Jem, well actually it’s a really long name so I’m
going to leave it there. I’m 26 and I from London, England.
So what am I doing in Japan now? - Well I’m a Third year JET
in the Seino area in Gifu Prefecture and I work in a High
school. Apart from that I do like to travel around and watch
the street performers and buskers.
Why am I in Japan in the first place? - First things first I want
to be a teacher.(and I have a deep and abiding love for Mangawhere else would I go for that?)
I also wanted to try living in a completely different
environment from where I came from so as you see I’m here in
Japan!
Welcome to Gifu! I'm Simon, and I'm the lesser half of the Seino
RPA duo. I'm not gonna give you another piece of advice
because god knows you don't need more. Instead I wrote you a
haiku:
JETs fresh off the plane,
It's balls hot now but be warned:
Winter is coming
Also brace yourselves for never-ending comments on the
weather. Look forward to meeting you!
Hello everyone! My name is Jasmine, and I'm an RPA for the
Chuno region. Welcome to Gifu! It's an awesome place - it's in
the center of Japan, which means easy travel most anywhere,
it's got the most delicious Hida beef (up there with Kobe beef),
gorgeous mountains, and - happily for a samurai nut like me the location of the Battle of Sekigahara. You've come to a great
place!! As for me, I love studying Japanese and I'm a big fan of
playing video games, soccer (or "football"), and music. And
samurai. Nice to meet you, and welcome!
Hello Everyone! My name is Tammy. Welcome to GIFU! :) I
have been living in Kani (about 1 hour SE from Gifu City) since
August 2013 and teaching at Tono Senior High School. My JET
experience thus far has been amazing and very different from
the sunny state of California, USA where I grew up. I enjoy
trying new things, snatching up deals, and going on adventures.
I look forward to get to know all of you and make the most of
our JET experience together! See you soon! ;)
Tammy will become the next ALT PA following Jason’s
departure in August.
G’Day! I’m from Australia, mate. I grew up on the highlands of
down under, which means I’m from way down under. Most of what
is unusual about man can be summed up in one word: 'culture'. I
lived in Japan for a stint some 10 years ago and decided it was
time to get back into it, so I jumped on the JET program. I enjoy
working on cars and other such tinkering. I also find joy in kicking
a soccer ball. If I don’t know the answer to something, I can
usually make up a good story.
Hello incoming JETs! I’m Brandon from California, U.S.A., SHS ALT
in Ogaki and RPA for Gifu Region. Welcome to Gifu! Gifu is a great
place with something to do for everyone. If you’re like me and enjoy
Japanese cultural aspects such as taiko drumming, festivals, and
FOOD, Gifu has all of that and more. You can usually find me out and
about on weekends, often traveling to different parts of Japan or
hanging out with the Gifu-ians, and with various activities after work
on the weekdays like rock climbing and taiko. Looking forward to
meeting you and please let me know if you need help with anything!
A big YOUKOSO and Welcome to the new JETs from your
friendly Hida RPA Derek Gumb! Although he hails from
Shirakawa-Go, a remote UNESCO village nestled deep in the
mountains of Hida, there have been frequent sightings of him
at Enkais, get-togethers, and anywhere adventure lurks. In
his spare time he enjoys hiking Kinka-San, swimming the
Nagara River, sleeping in Gassho-Zukuri houses, rock
climbing in Gifu-Shi, juggling at festivals, and sipping on
Doburoku while pondering how someone came up with the
idea of Cormorant fishing. Gumb is super excited to meet the
new JETs and help them get acquainted to the wackiness of
life in Japan! Reach out to him if you have any ideas or just
want to kick it ([email protected]). Stay tuned for an actionpacked year... ~KAPOW!~
Welcome to Gifu! I'm Kelly, a 3rd year ALT and RPA for the
Hida Region (aka The North). Originally from Colorado, USA,
I'm the last person in Japan without a smart phone or a car.
Not sure how I've made it this long without either. I teach at
elementary and junior high, and live across from a giant
1,100-year-old cherry tree called Garyuzakura. I love living in
Hida because all of my schools have stunning views of the
mountains!
TAKAYAMA
Hello everyone! My name is Adam Reyes and I work as a
prefectural ALT in Ena High School. This will be my fourth year
on JET and I am looking forward to fulfilling my role as one-half
of the Tono RPA team. I have always wanted to come to Japan,
and now that I am here, I am trying to make the most of my
experience and explore the country as much as I can.
On my down time, I “study” Japanese (less text book and more
Anki and video games), play basketball (if I manage to find a
court), and I eat way too much (I love the food here). We’re very
lucky to be living and working in Japan so let’s take full
advantage of this opportunity and have a wonderful year
together.
Hi there! My name is Jill and I'm a third year ALT in Tokishi.
This is my second year as an RPA and I'm excited about working
with everyone this year! After studying abroad in Tokyo during
college, I knew I wanted to come back, and I've been enjoying
every minute of it!
When I'm not living the glorious ALT dream, I'm nerding out and
spending way too much money playing crane games at game
centers or putting on crazy wigs and taking pictures in purikura
photo booths. No matter what you're in to, there's tons to enjoy in
Gifu!
Communicating with your Predecessor
By now you may have been in touch with your predecessor in Gifu. We have asked
each predecessor to provide you with an official ‘Predecessor Pack’, which gives you an
overview of your new job, the environment and apartment you live in. Read it carefully
and do not be afraid to ask any extra questions.
Purchasing items from your predecessor
Your predecessor may have items of furniture or cookware that can make your
transition to life in Japan much easier. If you do buy/receive stuff from your
predecessor, it may be wise to ask for pictures and negotiate prices. As a rule,
your predecessor is required to clean and VACATE the apartment thoroughly for
your arrival.
If you have any issues with a predecessor, please contact your CO.
Vehicles:
In some cases, you will have the opportunity to purchase your car from your
predecessor. Often, if the ALT is in a rural area, a car is necessary to commute to
school. In this case, the school will help in the transfer of ownership from the
previous ALT to the new ALT. If this is your situation, it would be a good idea to
confirm with your new supervisor about the condition of the car and the price
your predecessor is asking for it, rather than rushing into purchase.In some cases,
your predecessor may have purchased a car on their own and the school was not
involved in the purchase. If the school is not helping in the name transfer, exercise
caution if you purchase a car from your predecessor. There have been instances
where an unscrupulous predecessor has taken advantage of their successor.
Check the condition of the car before purchasing. The paperwork of registering a
car to a new owner is a rather complicated affair and can become very difficult if
the previous owner of the car is not with you at the motor vehicle office.
IMPORTANT WARNING – “bargain” cars and shaken
If you are buying or taking your predecessor’s car for free or what appears to be a
bargain price, please be careful. In Japan it is not necessary to get a
roadworthiness test done before transferring the title of a car and so the only
guarantee you have about the condition of the car is your predecessor’s word. If
you inherit a car with problems you could be in for a shock. Large repairs and
disposal of a car in Japan costs a lot of money. There is a system here called
shaken. This is a roadworthiness pass test certificate which often costs more
money than the cost of an old car! It can cost up to 200,000 or more if you have
to get lots of repairs
Your apartment (GIH 133)
PUBLIC APARTMENT:
•There are ALTs who are housed in either prefectural or municipal public housing. These
buildings tend to be older buildings and the condition and facilities of the apartment
units are not as good as typical private apartments. However, the price for the rent is
very reasonable. Deposit (shikikin) is not required. Chattels and amenities may be
minimal and in poor condition, depending on your predecessors. Before making any
major changes to the unit, you must get permission from the governmental division that
runs the apartment.
PRIVATE APARTMENT:
ALTs will occasionally be housed in privately owned apartments. These are contract based
and may require a large deposit (“shikikin”) to be paid when first moving in, as well as a
guarantor.
EXTRA QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR PREDECESSOR ABOUT THE APARTMENT
•Bathroom and toilet - western or Japanese (crouch style)
•What amenities are close by? (for that night when you just don’t want to cook for
yourself)
•Are there any monthly communal cleanings, grass cutting chores, etc, involved.
•Does a rental deposit (shikikin*) have to be paid, or a payment of thanks (reikin*) in
advance?
•Rules: pets, overnight guests, etc.
•Is there a communal fee for amenities / repairs to the building ?
•Does noise travel between apartments? (be careful)
•Safe way to operate gas / kerosene appliances. Leaving these on when you sleep or are
out may lead to monoxide poisoning (cases every year in Japan), explosions or other. Get
into the habit of checking that gas and heaters are turned off firmly.
•How to clean your bathroom (avoid mould), tatami mats?
*Shikikin is the deposit to be paid to the landlord when entering into a rental contract.
It is equivalent to 1-4 months’ rent and is paid at the beginning. This is collateral,
generally used in the case of non-payment of rent or to repair any damage caused by the
tenant during their stay in the apartment.
Shikikin (the 4 scenarios)
•The JET pays with his/her own money
•Your Contracting Organization (CO) may pay it on your behalf as a “loan”
 this will not happen in the case of Prefectural ALTs in private apartments.
•Your CO may pay it for you and not require you to repay them at all.
•Not required
Reikin is a one-time set-amount payment thanking the landlord for renting to you. It is
non-refundable.
Driving in Japan– (GIH 145)
Detailed information about driving in Japan can be found in the General
Information Handbook.
MAIN POINTS
•To drive a car you must be at least 18 years of age
•Drinking and Driving is strictly prohibited. There is ZERO tolerance for this – that
means 0.00. Be careful even of driving the morning after alcohol consumption.
•Japanese drivers commonly exceed the limit by 5-10 km/h (Use common sense
and do not get caught exceeding the limits)
•Common accidents in Japan include speeding over red lights , parking a car in a
dangerous position, and collisions with bicycles
•Most roads in Japan are toll free, with the exception of expressways (ETC payment
in Gifu) and some tourist routes
If you want to save yourself a lot of bother in Japan, please do the following
before you depart:
•Check your drivers’ license immediately – does it have a date of issue printed on
the license?
If yes, that’s great – and don’t forget to bring your license with you as well
as your IDP.
If no, you won’t be able to switch to a Japanese license unless you get an
official record from the road and transport authority that issued the license
verifying the date of issue. There is absolutely no compromise on this
condition – when you apply for your license if you don’t have proof of the
date of issue your application will be declined. Tackling this from Japan is an
extremely arduous process and NOT recommended.
If you have had your passport renewed and still have your old passports, then bring
these with you to Japan as well. You may be asked to provide them when applying
for your license.
Resources
Gifu Jets Web-Site
This brand new for 2014 resource keeps you up to date with the latest news
about the JET Programme events happening in Gifu, teaching tips, a
comprehensive Japanese section and all of the necessary info you need to
make living in Gifu a little bit easier.
This is your JET Website so if you have any ideas for what you want to see up
there please let us know at [email protected]
General Information Handbook
Your JET bible ! General information about the
programme and how to make the most of your
time in Japan. Learn about your holiday leave,
japanese language courses, what to do if you get
sick in Japan, what pension you are entitled to
when you return, how to extend your visa, and
more.
Jet Programme website / CLAIR
Access the news from CLAIR published every two months,
read about various JET participants and their experiences
in Japan, and identify what is covered in your JET Accident
Insurance package.
GIFU International Centre
http://www.gic.or.jp/english/e-index.html
Gifu AJET
(Facebook)
https://www.facebook.com/gifu.ajet

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