PowerPoint - mcas

Report
2015 MCAS Alternate Assessment
Introduction to MCAS-Alt
Massachusetts Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education
with
Measured Progress
Welcome
Introductions




Department staff
Teacher Consultants
Measured Progress
Training Specialists
Goals for the session
 To provide you with tools and strategies for constructing
the alternate assessment portfolio
 To help you to understand the alternate assessment
process
2
 How to link instruction to assessment
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Let’s Agree to:
Eliminate distractions
Cell phones, email, and internet
Participate
Minimize side chats, review all handouts
Take care of your needs
Coffee, breaks
Parking Lot
“I have a student who…”
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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4
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual, pp. 7–8
MCAS-Alt Security
Requirements
 Your role is to ensure that evidence is:
 authentic and portrays student performance accurately.
 not replicated, altered, or fabricated.
 Evidence must reflect each student’s unique abilities and
performance, regardless of participation in similar
classroom activities.
5
 ESE may request fact-finding investigation if irregularities
are found or reported.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual pp. 9–10
“Who Should Take MCAS-Alt?”
IEP team and 504 developers must decide
annually in each subject whether the student…
— Is generally unable to demonstrate knowledge and skills
on a paper-and-pencil test, even with accommodations,
AND
— Is addressing learning standards that have been
substantially modified due to the severity and complexity
of their disability, AND
— Receives intensive, individualized instruction in order to
acquire and generalize knowledge and skills.
If so, then he or she should take the MCAS-Alt in that subject.
Yes, a student can take the standard test in one subject,
and an alternate assessment in another.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
6
Educator’s Manual, p. 11, 21—30
Other students who may benefit
from the MCAS-Alt
If a student with a disability is…
— Addressing standards at or near grade-level,
— Sometimes able to take a paper-pencil test with
accommodations,
— Presented with unique and significant challenges in
demonstrating knowledge and skills on a test like the MCAS,
and
— Those challenges cannot be overcome using
accommodations on the standard test,
Then…
7
— Teams may consider the MCAS-Alt “Grade-level” (grades 3-8)
or “Competency” (high school) portfolio.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual, p. 2
Alternate Assessments in
districts that will administer
PARCC in 2015
Students designated for alternate assessments in the 20142015 school year will continue to submit the MCAS-Alt
portfolio, regardless of their districts’ choice to administer
either MCAS or PARCC.
8
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
MCAS-Alt Terminology
9
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
What’s the “Buzz:”
MCAS-Alt Terminology
Content Area: The subject in which an MCAS-Alt
portfolio is submitted; e.g., English Language
Arts/Literacy (ELA), Mathematics, Science &
Technology/Engineering (STE)
Strand: A group of standards in ELA/Literacy and
STE organized around a central idea, concept, or
theme. (e.g., Writing, Life Science)
Domain: A group of related standards in
Mathematics organized around a central idea, concept,
or theme. (e.g., Functions)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
10
MCAS-Alt Terminology-cont’d
Cluster: Smaller group of related standards (e.g., “Define,
evaluate, and compare functions")
Standard: Statement of what all students should know and
be able to do. (e.g., 8.F.A.1 – Understand that a function is
a rule that assigns to each input exactly one output.)
Entry Points: Outcomes described in the Resource Guide
that are based on a learning standard at lower levels of
complexity or difficulty. Entry points will be the base for the
measurable outcome.
Access Skills: Developmental (communication or motor)
skills that are addressed during standards-based academic
activities in the content area being assessed.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
11
MCAS-Alt Terminology-cont’d
Measurable Outcome: A specific goal based on an
entry point in the strand/domain required for assessment
of a student in that grade.
A measurable outcome identifies an acceptable skill
to be assessed. Portfolio evidence in each portfolio
strand documents the student’s performance of the
measurable outcome.
(e.g., “Student will sort 3-dimensional shapes by
attribute with 80% accuracy and 80% independence”)
Resource Guide: Curriculum guide used to determine 12
instruction for students with disabilities based on the
Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Access to Your
Digital Resources
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Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Flash Drive
Tablets
www.mcas-alt.org/materials open PDF
version of document
“Open in” iBooks to save
Laptops/computers
Windows- My Computer> find drive
with flashdrive
MAC- Desktop >flashdrive “MCAS-ALT”
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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2015 MCAS-Alt Flash Drive
www.mcas-alt.org/materials
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Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Flash Drive You Received Today
Includes:
2014 Resource Guides (Updated)
ELA and Literacy
Math including High School
Science and Tech/Eng (Grades 5,8, 9 or 10)
2015 Educators’ Manual
PowerPoint Presentations
Math Glossary
ELA Glossary
Literature and Informational texts author
list
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Quick Tips
• Search
Text
• Highlight
• Comment
17
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Resource Guide to the
Massachusetts Curriculum
Frameworks for Students with
Disabilities
 Used as the basis for identifying skills to be assessed in the
MCAS-Alt portfolio
 Intended for use by educators to align and develop
instruction for students who have not yet mastered the
performance expectations of their peers
 Outlines a progression of skills from grade-level to less
complex (high-, medium-, and low-complexity) for each
grade-level learning standard based on the Curriculum
Frameworks
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Sometimes, It Seems Like This….
Learning
Standards
19
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
…It Could Be More Like This…
Learning
Standards
Grade Level
Entry Points
Access Skills
20
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual p.34
Based on 2011 Curriculum Framework:
Standards, Entry Points, Access Skills
“Essence” of standard:
Solve mathematical problems
involving 3-D shapes
Visually track
geometric
shapes
Access
Skills
Less Complex
Match same
shapes with
different
orientations
Sort twodimensional
shapes by
attribute
(e.g., number
of sides)
Entry Points
Calculate
the
surface
area of a
cube
H.G.-GMD.4
Identify the shapes
of two-dimensional
cross-sections of
three-dimensional
objects, and
identify threedimensional
objects generated
by rotations of twodimensional
objects.
Standard as
written
More Complex
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Features of the
2014 ELA Resource Guide
 Standards and Entry Points provide examples to illustrate
and model the standard (“e.g., …”)
 Entry points are numbered to correspond with standard
number
 If too complex, spiral to entry points in lower grades.
 Access skills are listed at the lowest grade in each strand
 For collecting evidence, use the student’s primary mode of
expression (production), communication, and preferred
method and format for presenting materials.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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2014 Resource Guide: ELA
Cluster
Heading
Standards
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Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
2014 Resource Guide for ELA:
Entry Points and Access Skills
Cluster
Heading
Standard
Number
Access
Skills
Entry
Points
24
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
2014 Resource Guide for ELA:
“Vocabulary Acquisition and Use”
Standard
Cluster
Heading
Grade
25
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Features of the
2014 Mathematics Resource Guide
 Standards and Entry Points provide examples to illustrate
and model the standard.
 If entry point is too complex, spiral to entry points in lower
grades in the same domain, clusters may not match.
 For all grades, entry points must be used as is, to develop
measurable outcomes.
 Access skills are listed at the lowest grade in a domain or a
high school conceptual category
26
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
2014 Mathematics Resource Guide
Cluster
Heading
Standard
Number
27
Standards
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
2014 Mathematics Resource Guide
Example
Cluster Heading
Access Skills
Entry Points
28
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Features of the
2014 Mathematics HS Resource
Guide
 High School Conceptual Categories
Number and Quantity
Algebra
Functions
Geometry
Statistics and Probability
 If entry point is too complex, spiral to entry points in lower
grades in the same conceptual categories.
 Access skills are listed at the lowest grade in a domain or 29
a
high school conceptual category
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
2014 Mathematics HS
Resource Guide
Cluster
Heading
Standard
Number
30
Standards
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
2014 HS Mathematics Resource
Guide
Cluster
Heading
Entry Points
Access
Skills
31
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Features of the Science and
Tech/Eng Resource Guide
 All entry points are acceptable skills for creating the
measurable outcome.
 Standards are based 2001/2006 Curriculum
Frameworks
 If entry point is too complex, spiral to entry points
in lower grades in the same topic.
 Access skills are listed at the lowest grade at each
topic.
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Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Topic Grid for Science
33
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
2014 Science and Tech/Eng
Resource Guide
Topic
Standards
Essence
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
34
Science and Technology/Engineering
Entry Points
Entry Points
35
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Required Assessments
in Each Grade
36
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual, pp. 13–19
English Language Arts and Literacy
Progression of Strands from Pre-K Through High School
ELA Resource Guide, p. 7
Grade Level
Strands
PK
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9-10 11-12
For MCAS-Alt, select one Reading skill for assessment from any strand marked below with a
(), according to the student’s grade.
Reading
Literature

Reading
Informational
Text


















(Grade
10 only)

(Grade
10 only)
Reading
Foundational
Skills
Reading  Literacy
in History/Social
Studies
Reading  Literacy
in Science and
Technical Subjects
Assess choice of
one entry point in:

• Reading
• Writing (Grades 4, 7, 10)
• Language
(“Vocabulary
Acquisition and Use”)
(Grade
10 only)

(Grade
10 only)
For MCAS-Alt, select one Writing skill for assessment from any strand marked below with a
(), according to the student’s grade.

Writing


(Grade
10 only)
Writing 
Literacy in
History/Social
Studies, Science,
and Technical
Subjects
KEY
 = Assessed by MCAS-Alt


(Grade
10 only)
For MCAS-Alt, select one Language skill for assessment from standards 4, 5, or 6
(“Vocabulary Acquisition and Use”), according to the student’s grade.
Language
Speaking and
Listening







(Grade
10 only)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
37
Mathematics Domains and the Grades in Which
They Are Taught and Assessed
Must be
assessed
in Grades
3-8
 Choose 3 of
the 5
Conceptual
Categories for
High School
38
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual, pp.13-15
Grade 3–5 MCAS-Alt Requirements
Must be assessed in the following
Strands/Domains
Content areas
A student in this
grade

One portfolio strand each in:
o Reading
o Language (Vocabulary Acquisition
and Use) (i.e.,L.3.4,L.3.5,L.3.6)

One portfolio strand each in:
o Operations and Algebraic Thinking
o Measurement and Data

One portfolio strand each in:
o Reading
o Language (Vocabulary Acquisition
and Use) (i.e., L.4.4,L.4.5,L.4.6)
o Writing

One portfolio strand each in:
o Operations and Algebraic Thinking
o Number and Operations-Fractions

One portfolio strand each in:
o Reading
o Language (Vocabulary Acquisition
and Use)(i.e., L.5 .4,L.5.5,L.5.6)
One portfolio strand each in:
o Number and Operations in Base
39
Ten
o Number and Operations-Fractions
English Language Arts
3


Mathematics

English Language Arts

Mathematics
4

5
English Language Arts


Mathematics

Science and Technology/Engineering (STE)
may be done over 2 years

One portfolio strand each in any three
STE strands
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual pp.16-18
Grade 6 –8 MCAS-Alt Requirements
Must be assessed in the following
A student in this grade
Content areas
Content areas


English Language Arts
One portfolio strand each in:
o Reading
o Language (Vocabulary
Acquisition and Use) (i.e., L.6.4,
L.6.5, L.6.6)
6


Mathematics


English Language Arts
7


Mathematics


English Language Arts
8

One portfolio strand each in:
o The Number System
o Ratios and Proportional
Relationships
One portfolio strand each in:
o Reading
o Language (Vocabulary
Acquisition and Use) . (i.e.,
L.7.4, L.7.5, L.7.6)
o Writing
One portfolio strand each in:
o Ratios and Proportional
Relationships
o Geometry
One portfolio strand each in:
o Reading
o Language (Vocabulary
Acquisition and Use)(i.e., L.8.4,
L.8.5, L.8.6)
One portfolio strand each in:
o Expressions and Equations
o Geometry

Mathematics

Science and Technology/Engineering

One portfolio strand each in any three
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
may be done over 2 years
STE strands
40
Educator’s Manual p. 19
High School
A student in this grade
Must be assessed in the following
Content areas
9 OR 10



3 standards in one of the
following disciplines:
o Biology
o Introductory Physics
o Chemistry
o Technology/Engineering

One portfolio strand each in:
o Reading
o Language (Vocabulary
Acquisition and Use) (i.e.,L910 .4,L9-10.5,L.9-10.6)
o Writing

Any three of five Conceptual
Categories :
o Number and Quantity
o Functions
o Algebra
o Geometry
o Statistics and Probability
Science and
Technology/Engineering
English Language Arts
10

Content areas
Mathematics
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Educator’s Manual p. 19
High School:
Science and Technology/Engineering
Grade 9 or 10
Evidence may be compiled over two consecutive school years in this subject.
(7/1/13–4/2/15)
Example of a discipline in high school STE:
Biology 1 – Learning Standard 2.7 (Meiosis)
Biology 2 – Learning Standard 6.4 (Ecology)
Biology 3 – Learning Standard 5.1 (Evolution)
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Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual p. 33
“How will my student address the learning
standards for the MCAS-Alt portfolio?”
Students can address a standard in the required strand
in several ways:
• At the same level of difficulty as non-disabled students in that
grade (“at grade-level”)
If not, then…
• At a lower level of complexity (i.e., below grade-level
expectations) (“entry point”)
If not, then…
• Address an (“entry point” at a lower grade)
If not, then…
• Address a motor or communication “access skill” during a
standards-based activity in the required strand
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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Educator’s Manual pp. 33,34,49
Access Skills
 For students with the most significant cognitive
disabilities addressing a developmental skill.
 Students must practice the skill in the context of a
standards–based activity in the required strand/domain
assessed in the student’s grade.
 Possible approaches for students who do not produce
written samples:
 Design instruction that does not require written product
 Scribe the student’s responses on a work sample
(“teacher-scribed work sample”)
 Photograph or video the student performing the task
(Consent needed) Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
44
Educator’s Manual p.61
Required Portfolio Elements
Artistic Cover
Portfolio
Cover
Sheet
Student’s
Weekly
Schedule
(Optional)
School
Calendar
(holidays, summer
school, snow days;
previous year for
Science, if applicable)
Student’s
Introduction
to the
Portfolio
Verification
Form
(signed by
parent; or
log of
attempts)
Consent
Forms
for photo or
video
(Keep on file
at school)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
45
Educators Manual p. 33
“Core Set of Evidence”
A complete Portfolio Strand must include at least the
following evidence:
Data Chart
Strand
Cover
Sheet
+
showing performance of
the measurable outcome
on at least 8 different
dates with brief
descriptions
+
First piece of
additional primary
evidence* showing
performance of the
measurable outcome
listed on data chart
+
Second piece of
additional primary
evidence* showing
performance of the
measurable outcome
listed on data chart
* May be a work sample, video segment, or photograph (or
series of photos) clearly showing an end product.
Evidence must be labeled with name, date, percent accuracy,46
and percent independence.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Student
Student
47
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Sample Student Data Chart
Student
48
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Label:
Name,
Date,
Accuracy,
Independence,
and Brief
Description
(required for
each piece of
evidence)
Student
Student
49
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Student
50
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Label:
Name,
Date,
Accuracy,
Independence,
and Brief
Description
(required for
each piece of
evidence)
Student
51
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Work Sample
Description label
not required if the
evidence is
properly labeled
52
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
STORY CARDS
53
Supporting Documentation:
Does not show actual performance or an end product, but
gives clarifying information.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual p.39
Supporting Documentation
 Products that show or describe the learning context, but
do not show actual performance or an end product:
 Photographs or videos that show setting,
instructional approach, materials, etc., but not
actual student performance
 Aids and supports used by the student
54
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Student
55
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual pp.39,52
What is Self-Evaluation?
Evidence of choices made by student;
for example, that he/she has:
Reflected on his or her performance
Selected work for the portfolio
Chosen materials/activities
Set own goal for learning
Graphed own performance
Monitoring tasks accomplished on a checklist
Used a scoring rubric to rate own performance
Self-corrected work (as indicated by the teacher)
 Self-evaluation is done by the student, not by the teacher.
 Stickers on work are not examples of self-evaluation
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
56
More Examples of Self-Evaluation
(Reflection)
Student responded in writing
to questions about the work
he/she completed.
Student used symbols to
respond to questions about
his/her work.
57
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
“Time” for a break
58
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Portfolio Assessment
Process
59
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual pp.33-37
Steps in Assessing Your Student
1. Identify the assessment requirements for a student in that
grade (Educator’s Manual pp 13-19).
2. Identify a standard in the required strand at the grade level
of the student (Resource Guide).
3. Pre-test to find the correct level of difficulty to begin
assessing the student.
4. Identify an entry point (or access skill) for the standard
(Resource Guide).
5. Create the measurable outcome from the selected entry
point (or access skill), add criteria (e.g. 80% accuracy and
100% independence)
6. Collect and label evidence based on measurable outcome.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
60
60
Educator’s Manual pp. 37–41
How to Identify a Skill to Assess
 Identify a strand required for MCAS-Alt
Example: Biology (Resource Guide)
 Then, select one standard you feel is appropriate to teach
your student
 Topic: Heredity, Standard 3.4, High School (Resource Guide,
page 60): Distinguish among observed inheritance patterns
caused by several types of genetic traits….
Review entry points, beginning with “more complex”
 “Describe how the cell’s genetic code is mapped in its DNA”
(High School, page 61)
 “Sort characteristics that are inherited versus not inherited
(determined by genetics)” (Grades 6-8, page 59)
 “ Identify parents and offspring of different species”
(PreK-Grade 2, page 56)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
61
Educator’s Manual pp. 37–41
How to Identify a Skill (cont’d)
Based on pre-testing, what single skill should be
targeted for assessment?
 Select the skill at the level of complexity that challenges the
student.
 If too challenging for the student, adjust level downward.
Describe how the cell’s genetic code is mapped in its DNA
 If student has already mastered, then not challenging enough,
Identify parents and offspring of different species
 If challenging and attainable, then target the skill.
Sort characteristics by inherited versus not inherited
 Once the correct level of complexity is established,
begin collecting data and other evidence for the portfolio.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
62
Measurable Outcome...
Standards
Entry point or
Access Skills
Instructional
Activities
(brief
descriptions)
…..identifies an acceptable skill to be assessed.
Evidence in each portfolio strand documents the student’s
performance of the measurable outcome.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
63
The Measurable Outcome Should…
 Indicate what will be documented in the evidence.
 Be aligned with a grade-level learning standard at
a level of complexity appropriate for the student.
 Be listed on the Strand Cover Sheet (line 5), data
chart, and Work Sample Description labels.
 Remain consistent throughout the strand.
All brief descriptions and evidence must document
the same outcome.
 Allow students to progress toward mastery.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
64
ELA Measurable Outcome:
Language
65
Measurable Outcome: Student will sort words by categories
with 80% accuracy and 100% independence
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual p.3
ELA Measurable Outcome: Reading
Reading = “Text Comprehension”
Text comprehension includes the understanding of words,
phrases, and sentences in the context of a text, rather than in
isolation; and emphasizes applying, elaborating
on, and generalizing information from a text, rather than
simply recalling and recognizing information.
For example, a list of idiomatic expressions matched to
their meanings should not be included in the portfolio as
evidence of text comprehension. Instead, students must
identify the meaning of idiomatic expressions as they are
used in a specific text.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
66
Educator’s Manual p. 3
ELA Measurable Outcome: Reading
 Evidence and brief descriptions in the ELA Reading portfolio
strand must identify either informational or literary text
according to the strand chosen for assessment either by:
the title of the published text,
or
a photocopy or printout of the text, if it is teachercreated, untitled or if it includes multiple selections from a
digital source, (e.g. worksheets from teacher websites)
or
the actual text (e.g., sentence, passage, narrative, etc.)
from which words, phrases, or excerpts were selected
67
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
ELA Measurable Outcome: Writing
 ELA Resource Guide emphasizes student’s primary mode
of expression (production) and communication, and
preferred method and format for presentation of materials.
 “…Using dictation, drawing, writing, or student’s
primary mode of communication…”
 Resource Guide
Example of Measurable Outcome in Writing:
Student will order events to tell a story using pictures
68
with 90% accuracy and 100% independence.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
How does your student
communicate?
Oral language
Sounds
Symbols (photos, icons)
Objects
Gestures
Sign language
Eye gaze
High tech device (e.g., Dynavox)
Low tech device (e.g., communication book)
Other?
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
69
Science and Technology/Engineering (STE)
(Grades 5, 8 and 9/10)
Entry points are acceptable as written
Examples and descriptions on some entry points
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
70
Examples of Measurable
Outcomes in Three Content Areas
The student will…
 Identify the major stages of the life cycle of a
butterfly….
 Choose the most appropriate measurement tool to
measure an associated object…
 Order simple fractions on a number line...
 Summarize a text using key details from a story
read aloud…
…with 80% accuracy and 100% independence.
Are all of these skills observable and
measurable?
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
71
Create a Measurable Outcome!
Use the Resource Guide to locate an entry point or access
skill for a student in your classroom(or a past student).
Materials:
 Excerpt of the entry points from the 2014 Resource
Guide or flash drive
 2015 Educator’s Manual-“Required Assessment…”,
PowerPoint or flash drive
Create a measurable outcome based on the selected entry
point
 Modify if needed, without altering essential meaning
 Add % of accuracy and independence required for
mastery
72
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Forms and Graphs
73
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Where to find:
Forms and Graphs Online:
http://www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/alt/resources.html
Registration for trainings in January and March
Posted to www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/alt/resources
under the heading Statewide Training
www.mcasservicecenter.com
74
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Forms and Graphs
Available at:
www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/alt/resources.html
75
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Acceptable Digital Evidence for the
Portfolio
Submit separate CD, DVD, or flash drive for each
student
Acceptable digital evidence includes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
PowerPoint
Word document
.pdf files
.txt files
.jpg (JPEG)
DVD or standard movie formats
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
76
Technical Support
By telephone (toll-free):
1-866-834-8880 (Measured Progress Tech Support)
By email:
[email protected]
When requesting support, have available:
• Your name, school, and district
• Your computer platform (Windows or Macintosh)
• A summary of the problem you are experiencing
Expect a response within 24 hours (or sooner).
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
77
Data Charts
Educator’s Manual pp. 37-45
A Data Chart is Required
in Every Strand
Choice of Data Charts:
 Bar Graph, Line Graph, or Field Data Chart
What to include on each:
• Student’s name
• Standard at the student’s grade level
• Measurable Outcome aligned with Standard at grade level
• Data points on at least different 8 dates showing accuracy
and independence on each date
• Brief, clear descriptions beneath each date (i.e., What was
the student asked to do and how did he or she do it?)
• Optional, but strongly encouraged:
Include more than the eight date minimum.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
79
Data Chart Requirements, cont’d
 Dates must be from current school year for ELA
and Math (i.e., 7/1/14- 4/2/15), and current
and/or one previous school year for Science and
Tech/Eng (i.e., 7/1/13 - 4/2/15)
 Dates for classroom work must be when school is
in session

Not on a weekend, holiday, or during school vacations,
unless marked “homework”
80
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual p. 88
Sample: Bar Graph
Measurable Outcome
At least 8 different dates are included on graph.
Brief description of each data point that
addresses the outcome listed above
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
81
81
Sample: Line Graph
Educator’s
Manual p.89
Measurable Outcome
At least 8
different
dates are
included on
graph.
Brief description on each activity addresses
what the student was asked to do and how
they did it
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
82
Sample: Field Data Chart
Educator’s
Manual p.87
Measurable Outcome
At least 8 different dates included
Responseby-response
data
collection
Brief descriptions on each data point
addresses what the student was asked to do
and how they did it
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
83
Educator’s Manual p.38
1.
2.
3.
4.
How to Determine
Accuracy and Independence
Determine the outcome – What are you asking the student to do?
Determine the activity – How will the student perform the skill?
Divide the activity into “items” or steps – See example below
Develop a system for marking each item – For example, +, —, I, P
Sample Brief Description: Student answered five comprehension
questions about a story read aloud in class.
Question Number Accurate (Correct) or Independent or
Inaccurate (+, —)
Prompted (I, P)
Question 1
+ (Correct response)
P (Verbal prompt)
— (Incorrect response) P (Verbal prompt)
Question 2
Question 3
+ (Correct response)
P (Gestural prompt)
— (Incorrect response) P (Verbal prompt)
Question 4
Question 5
+ (Correct response)
I (No prompt)
Overall Percent
60% accuracy
20% independence
(3 of 5 correct)
(1 of 5 independent)
Note: A student response using
anyDepartment
promptof =
Not independent
Massachusetts
Elementary
and Secondary Education
84
Educator’s Manual p. 35
Brief Descriptions must include:
What did the student do?
• what was the skill?
How did the student perform the skill:
•what instructional approach was used?
•what materials (including text) was used?
Measurable outcome: Student will create a rhyming couplet on a given topic
with 80% accuracy and 100% independence.
Brief description of activity: Student generated a rhyming couplet, about the
topic summer, on the computer.
WHAT
HOW
85
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual p. 35
Brief Descriptions must :
Document the same skill and any
conditions present in the measurable
outcome
Measurable outcome: Student will multiply two-digit number by a
two-digit number using an array or area model with 80% accuracy
and 100% independence.
WHAT
Brief description of activity: Student solved 5 two-digit by two-digit
multiplication problems, using student created arrays on the
whiteboard.
HOW
Were all aspects of the measurable outcome met in the
brief description?
Would a scorer understand
what
the student
did?
Massachusetts
Department
of Elementary and
Secondary Education
86
Acceptable Brief Descriptions
Measurable Outcome:
Walter will identify simple machines with 80% accuracy and
100% independence.
Date
(m/d/y)
9/12/14 10/15/14 10/17/14 10/24/14 11/4/14 11/14/14 11/20/14
What the Identified After
student
simple
listening to
did (skill) machines “Simple
by
Machines,”
How did labeling identified
they do
pictures simple
it?
in an
machines
(approach, adapted
in the
materials) textbook book by
pointing to
correct
name of
simple
machine
Homework:
Identified
simple
machines
at home,
made a list
of the ones
he found
Worksheet
identified
inclined
planes and
levers as
simple
machines
using
pictures
and text
After
watching
video,
Wheels
and
Axles,
identified
wheels
and axles
around
the
school
Using
Home
Depot
flyer,
Walter
identified
levers and
wedges
using a
bingo
dauber
After
watching
Eduhead
on the
computer,
Walter
identified
inclined
planes by
matching
them to
the
pictures in
the video
12/5/14
Class
created a
poster of
simple
machines
he
identified
the simple
machines
by labeling
the poster
with Post-it
87
Notes.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Activity
Are the following brief descriptions acceptable ? All
measurable outcomes came directly from the Resource
Guide.
Measurable Outcome: Mary will answer simple comprehension questions
about an informational text with 80% acc. and 100 % ind. (Reading Lit)
Brief Description: Read chapter 1 from Fudge, summarized the main idea.
Measurable Outcome: Pasqual will find the sum of the values of a mixed
group of coins with 80% acc. and 100 % ind. (MD)
Brief Description: Student used money to buy a soda.
Measurable Outcome: Sophia will identify words that correspond to icons
found in the environment with 80% acc. and 100% ind. (Lang.)
Brief Description: Identified all the EXIT signs on the way to the bus by
pointing.
Measurable Outcome: Yi will distinguish between parallel and intersecting
lines with 80 % acc and 100% ind. (G)
88
Brief Description: Worked on EDM during morning group with Miss Sue,
pointed to parallel lines, 3/5 prompted.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Activity
Are the following brief descriptions acceptable ? All
measurable outcomes came directly from the
Resource Guide.
Measurable Outcome: Mary will answer simple comprehension questions
about an informational text with 80% acc. and 100 % ind.
Brief Description: Read chapter 1 from Fudge, summarized the main idea
Not Acceptable
Measurable Outcome: Pasqual will find the sum of the values of a mixed
group of coins with 80% acc. and 100 % ind.
Brief Description: Student used money to buy a soda. Not Acceptable
Measurable Outcome: Sophia will identify words that correspond to icons
found in the environment with 80% acc. and 100% ind.
Brief Description: Identified all the EXIT signs on the way to the bus by
pointing. Acceptable
Measurable Outcome: Yi will distinguish between parallel and intersecting
89
lines with 80 % acc and 100% ind.
Brief Description: Worked on EDM during morning group with Miss Sue,
pointed to parallel lines, 3/5 prompted. Not Acceptable
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Write a Brief Description
Use the measurable outcome you created from the entry
point or access skill
 Create 3 activities that would align with the
measurable outcome
 Write brief descriptions that describe ‘what (skill) the
student did and how (instructional approach and
materials) they did it’ for each activity
 Do the brief descriptions address the measurable
outcome?
(6 minutes)
 Then, report out at your table.
90
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual, p. 54
Generalized Performance
 Documenting the use of different instructional methods and
approaches during learning activities that assess the same skill
= Generalized Performance
 For example, using the following to create evidence for the
portfolio:
 Multiple-choice and open-response formats
 Verbal and written responses
 Varied media and materials (not only paper/pencil)
 Work completed in a community setting
Notes:
 Different settings and people assisting the student do not, by
themselves, demonstrate generalized performance, unless activity
91
format is also different.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Portfolio Evidence
Educator’s Manual, pp. 35–37
What Is Primary Evidence?
Primary Evidence: Evidence that documents the student’s
performance of the measurable outcome, including:
• Data charts
– bar or line graphs: one task or activity per date
– field data charts: several tasks on each date, with
percentages summarized for each date
• Work samples
– produced by student (or scribed by teacher),
including digital evidence
And, if they show the student’s actual performance:
• Photographs that show an end product of instruction
• Video segment (up to 3 minutes)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
93
Educator’s Manual, pp.36-37
A Photograph is Primary Evidence When…
 It shows the end product of instruction
or a sequence of steps leading to
creation of the final product
 The work sample is either too large, fragile,
temporary in nature, or unsafe to include in a portfolio
 Like work samples, photos must be labeled.
The following information can be listed on the evidence
OR on a Work Sample Description label:
 Student’s name
 Date
 % Accuracy and % Independence
 Brief description of the activity
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
94
Educator’s Manual, p. 35
A Series of Photographs
= One Piece of Primary Evidence
Student was asked to find a
shape by the attribute. (round)
Student’s response can be seen
clearly.
Student was asked to find a
shape by the attribute. (straight
sides) Student’s response can be
seen clearly.
Each series shows a
two-step activity that
was described and
labeled correctly.
[Student] December 12, 2014
Accuracy: 100%
Independence: 100%
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
95
Can this Photograph be used as
Primary evidence?
NO! This does not meet the criteria to be
used as primary evidence.
This photo only shows the context of the
learning activity, but not clear evidence of
his/her responses. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
96
Educator’s Manual, p.35
Video is Primary Evidence When…
 Student performs a task and no other tangible evidence can
be collected
 It shows the end product of instruction (or a sequence of
steps leading to the creation of the end product); OR
 It shows or describes a work sample that is either too large,
fragile, temporary in nature, or unsafe to include in a portfolio
 Sample must be 3 minutes or less
NOTES:
 Must include a brief description of the task or activity
 Sound quality must be clear, or be transcribed in writing.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
97
Educator’s Manual, p. 37
Teacher-Scribed Work Sample
• For students who do not produce written work
• Documents a series of trials conducted at the same time
• Indicates the student’s response (accuracy, independence)
to each item/trial, using preferred mode of communication
• Specifically describes the materials/context of the activity
• Labeled with name, date, accuracy, independence, other
information as needed.
98
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual, p. 37
Example of a teacher-scribed work sample
A series of tasks recorded by the teacher on one date.
99
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Important Reminders:
Review the 2015 Educator’s Manual;
Use only the most current Resource Guides;
All Reading strands must provide name of a
the published text or a copy;
Data charts that begin at or above 80% in
both accuracy and independence are not
scorable;
Entry points should be converted directly as is
to create a measurable outcome, only minor
modifications can be made. Outcomes not
found in the resource guide must be preapproved by the Department.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
100
Important Reminders:
IMPORTANT: First date on chart must begin below 80%
accurate or below 80% independent (or both) to show
that a new skill was taught.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
101
ELA Measurable Outcome: Reading
 Choose either a Literature or Informational Text Reading strand.
All titles and photocopies of text must be consistent with the
strand chosen.
 Measurable Outcome: Student will answer simple comprehension
questions based on literature with 80% acc. and 80% ind..
 Example of Brief Descriptions:
102
(author not necessary)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Conditions in the Math Resource Guide
1. Are you using the most current Resource Guide? (Fall 2014)
2. Are there conditions listed in the entry point?
Examples of Conditions:
real-life examples, using manipulatives, visual model, arrays
3. Are the conditions necessary for the essence of the
measurable outcome?
• If yes, you must include them during instructional
activities
• If no, remove from the measurable outcome
Example: Locate unit fractions on a number line. (entry point)
Number line is a necessary condition. (review Number
and Operations-Fractions standard 3.NF.A.2)
103
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Using a Math Entry Point to Create a
Measurable Outcome
Option 1:
Use Entry Point as written to create a Measurable Outcome:
“Student will solve number sentences that represent one-step multiplication
and division word problems with 80%accuracy and 100% independence”
 All work and all data points must show “solving number
sentences involving multiplication and division”
OR
Option 2:
Modify the Entry Point to meet your student’s needs:
“Student will solve number sentences that represent one-step multiplication
word problems with 80%accuracy and 100% independence”
 All work and all data points must show “solving number 104
sentences involving multiplication”
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Educator’s Manual p.53
Use of age-appropriate materials
The examples below, and others like them, are
inappropriate for use in student portfolios.
Document respectful tasks that are meaningful
and developmentally-appropriate.
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
105
Websites and Newsletter
 Resources and information:
www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/alt/resources.html
 MCAS-Alt Newsletters
106
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Portfolio Due Date:
Portfolios must be picked up from
the school by UPS on or before
Thursday, April 2, 2015.
Late portfolios will not be scored!
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
107
Contact Information:
MA Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education
 Daniel Wiener, Administrator of Inclusive Assessment
 Debra Hand, MCAS-Alt Program Specialist
781-338-3625
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/alt/
Measured Progress
 Kevin Froton, Project Manager
Email: [email protected]
Tech Support for Forms and Graphs Online:
(toll-free)1-866-834-8880
Register for training: www.mcasservicecenter.com
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
108

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