STAAR Alternate

Report
STAAR Alternate
Basic Training for Teachers
Education Service Center
Region XI
Fort worth, Texas
RETN Etiquette
Please turn OFF or mute cell phones
If you must take a call,
please take it outside
Be sure your microphones are muted.
Remember…
You may be seen or heard by other
sites at any time, even if you are not
speaking to the presenter.
2
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Attendance and Handouts
Credit for Attendance
Access to Handouts
• Your district site manager
should provide you with a
sign-in sheet
• Please be sure that all
participants who want
credit for attendance signin
• Coordinate with the site
manager to return the signin sheet to ESC Region XI
• Handouts are available
online on the ESC Region
XI website at
http://www.esc11.net/P
age/3706
• Click on “STAAR
Alternate Training
Resources” on the left
side menu
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
3
After today, this session will be available for
viewing via the VBrick system at
http://vbrick.esc11.net
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Notes for local district training
• These slides may be used for training of local
district personnel
• If any slide is amended or revised for use in local
trainings, please change the footer at the bottom
of the slide
Example Footer: Provided by _______ ISD (Source: ESC
Region 11 and TEA Student Assessment Division)
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Provided by ESC Region 11 (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Questions???
Opportunities to ask questions
will be provided throughout
the training.
[email protected]
6
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Objectives for this training
• Understand the major components of the
STAAR Alternate assessment
• Understand Test Administrator (Teacher)
responsibilities relative to STAAR Alternate
• Understand the requirements for
participation in STAAR Alternate
• Review future plans for STAAR Alternate
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
How did we get here?
House Bill 5
(83rd Texas Legislature 2013)
STAAR-Alt
House Bill 3
(81st Texas Legislature, 2009)
Senate Bill 1031
(80th
Texas Legislature, 2007)
TAKS-Alt
• Requires re-design of the STAAR Alternate for 20132014
• Replaced TAKS-Alt
• 2011-2012
•Required new grade 3-8 assessments
•State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness
• Required EOC’s for secondary courses
• Replaced LDAA
• Field test 2006-2007 Operational 2007-2008
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
8
Student Assessment Division
Assessment Resources
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/
• Resource pages
• STAAR
• STAAR Modified
• Student Assessment
Resources
• A-Z Directory
• Subscribe to the
Student Assessment
Mailing List
• STAAR Alternate
•
•
•
•
STAAR L
TELPAS
TAKS
TAKS Modified
• What’s New in
Student Assessment
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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STAAR Grades 3 – 8
Based on GRADE enrollment
Subjects/Grades
3
4
5
6
7
8
Reading
Mathematics
Writing
Science
Social Studies

















Includes modified and alternate assessments
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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STAAR End-of-Course Assessments (EOC)
Based on COURSE enrollment
English
English I
Math
Algebra I
Science
Social Studies
Biology
U.S.
History
English II
Geometry
Chemistry
English III
Algebra II
Physics
World
History
World
Geography
Includes modified and alternate assessments
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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Which test do students take?
Students in grades 3–8 and students who entered grade 9
in 2011–2012 and thereafter
STAAR
General assessment for all students receiving grade
level instruction
STAAR L
ELL’s who meet participation requirements
STAAR Spanish (Gr. 3-5)
STAAR Modified
Students with disabilities who meet participation
requirements for an alternate assessment based on
modified achievement standards
Students in grades 3 and above with significant cognitive disabilities
STAAR Alternate
Must meet participation requirements for an
alternate assessment based on alternate
achievement standards
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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What is STAAR Alternate?
• STAAR Alternate is an alternate assessment
developed by the state to assess students with
significant cognitive disabilities.
• After instruction, the teacher observes the student performing
assessment tasks developed by the state that are linked to
grade-level TEKS.
• The teacher provides access to the assessment tasks by
developing supports and determining ways that the student
can demonstrate the task.
• The teacher documents the student’s performance on staterequired documentation forms, then evaluates the
performance in the online system.
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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STAAR Reporting Category
<>
Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)
Essence Statement
(A, B, C, D)
STAAR Alt Assessment Tasks
Complexity
Level 3
Predetermined
Predetermined
Criteria
Predetermined
Criteria
Criteria
Complexity
Level 2
Predetermined
Predetermined
Criteria
Predetermined
Criteria
Criteria
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Complexity
Level 1
Predetermined
Predetermined
Criteria
Predetermined
Criteria
Criteria
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Who takes STAAR Alternate?
• Students receiving special education services who:
• Have a significant cognitive disability
•
•
•
•
Access TEKS through prerequisite skills
Require supports throughout the day for nonacademic tasks
Need specialized instruction in the natural environment
Are routinely assessed through performance tasks
• There are no limits on the number of students who
can take a STAAR Alternate assessment, however…
• Up to 1% of the tested population can be counted as
proficient for AYP when tested with STAAR Alternate.
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
15
ARD Decision-Making
• If STAAR, with or without accommodations, is
NOT appropriate for a student, the ARD
committee must review participation
requirements for one of the alternate
assessments.
16
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
STAAR Alternate
Participation Requirements
Step I
Review the
Eligibility Criteria
17
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Step I: Review the Eligibility
Criteria for STAAR Alternate
• The ARD committee must answer “Yes” to these five
eligibility questions in order for the assessment to be
considered appropriate for a student.
• Does the student have a significant cognitive disability?
• Does the student require specialized supports to access the
grade-level curriculum and environment?
• Does the student require intensive, individualized instruction in a
variety of instructional settings?
• Does the student access and participate in the grade-level TEKS
through prerequisite skills?
• Does the student primarily demonstrate knowledge and skills
through performance tasks?
Provided by ESC Region 11 (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
18
STAAR Alternate
Participation Requirements
Step II
Discuss Assurances
Step III
Summarize the
Assessment Decision
19
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
ARD Decision-Making for
STAAR Alternate
• The ARD committee
will make the decision
for which complexity
level or combinations
of complexity levels
are appropriate for a
student for each
subject being assessed.
• The teacher must
abide by the ARD
committee decision.
• If, during instruction,
the teacher feels that
the selected
complexity level no
longer reflects the
student’s performance
level, the ARD
committee must
reconvene to evaluate
the previous decision.
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Making the Complexity Level Decision
• The ARD committee will determine that the student will
be assessed for each subject/course on:
• A specific complexity level for all tasks for all four
essence statements per subject/course, OR
• A range between two complexity levels as determined
by the indicators of progress
Solid Complexity Level
Description
L3
L2
L1
NRO
Indicators of Progress Box
Combinations of
Complexity Levels
L3 and L2
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
L2 and L1
21
“Student Characteristics for the STAAR
Alternate Complexity Levels”
• The ARD committee
must use this chart to
find the best
description of the
student’s performance
before determining
the complexity level or
combinations of levels
to be used for the
assessment.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
22
ARD Decision Making for
STAAR Alternate
• Additional information about the ARD decision-making process for
STAAR Alternate has been presented in the trainings listed below.
• Each of these trainings have been recorded and are available for
viewing via the VBrick system at http://www.esc11.net/Page/1086.
• Handouts for these trainings are available on the ESC Region 11
Federal and State Assessment webpage at
http://www.esc11.net/domain/423.
‘STAAR Alternate ARD Decision
Making – RETN’
Presented on October 1, 2013
‘ARD Committee DecisionMaking Process Training for
2013-2014 Texas Assessment
Program (RETN)’
Presented on October 7, 2013
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
23
STAAR Alternate
Test Administrator
Checklist
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
STAAR Alternate
Test Administrator Checklist
Training Requirements
Step 1: Select the
Assessment Task
Step 2: Implement the
Assessment Task
Step 3:
Observe/Document
Student Performance
Step 4: Evaluate
Student Performance
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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Training Requirements
• ALL test administrators must
• View Training Modules 1, 2, 3, and 4
• Successfully pass the STAAR Alternate
Qualification Activities with 80%
• Receive district training on general test
administration
• Review STAAR Alternate Manual
• Sign “Oath of Test Security and Confidentiality
for STAAR Alternate Administrator”
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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Training Modules
• Test administrators have two opportunities
to pass the Qualification Activities at 80%
• After a 2nd unsuccessful attempt
• Teacher informs the DTC or CTC
• District administration determines if the
teacher will be allowed a final attempt
• Supplemental training and supervision may be
required
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Training Modules
• Only NEW test administrators are required to
view the modules and pass the qualifications this
year.
• Any modules that have not been passed
previously must be taken again before the test
administrator can be given access to the
Assessment Management System.
• No changes were made to the modules or the
transcripts.
28
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Changes to the Modules
“Updates to the
Information
Presented in the
STAAR Alternate
Modules/
Transcripts”
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Changes to the Modules
• Many of the screenshots in the modules
show old resources.
• Teachers should use the STAAR Alternate
Resources webpage to ensure that the
most current document is being used.
• The screenshots for the Assessment
Management system in Module 4 have last
year’s date; however, the information
provided is still accurate.
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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Changes to the Modules
• The “List of
Resources” provided
at the end of each
module is incorrect.
• An updated resources
list is available on the
STAAR Alternate
Resources webpage.
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Training Requirements
Oath of Test Security
and Confidentiality for
STAAR Alternate Test
Administrator
32
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
STAAR Alternate Timelines
• The STAAR
Alternate Timeline
has been posted
and will be updated
periodically as
specific dates for
events have been
determined.
33
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Step 1: Select the assessment task
• View the Assessment Tasks for the
subjects/courses to be assessed
• Determine the targeted
prerequisite skills for instruction
• INSTRUCT THE STUDENT on the
targeted prerequisite skills
34
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
How does STAAR Alternate
measure the grade-level TEKS?
TEKS
STAAR Reporting
Category
Assessed
Curriculum
Essence
Statement
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
TEKS Vertical
Alignment
Curriculum
Frameworks
Prerequisite Skills
Assessment Tasks
35
TEKS Vertical Alignment Documents
• Complete listing of the TEKS academic content
standards from prekindergarten through all high
school courses on the minimum high school
program.
36
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
TEKS Vertical Alignment – Example
• Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills
• §113.20. Social Studies, Grade 8
• (b) Knowledge and skills.
• (28) Science, technology, and society. The student
understands the impact of scientific discoveries
and technological innovations on daily life in the
United States. The student is expected to:
• (A) compare the effects of scientific discoveries and
technological innovations that have influenced daily life
in different periods in U.S. history; and
• (B) identify examples of how industrialization changed
life in the United States.
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
37
TEKS Vertical Alignment – Example
Science, technology, and society. The student understands ways technology is used in the
home and school and how technology affects people’s lives (K.13). The student understands
how technology affects daily life, past and present (1.6). The student understands how science
and technology have affected life, past and present (2.17). The student understands how
individuals have created or invented new technology and affected life in various communities,
past and present (3.16). The student understands the impact of science and technology on life
in Texas (4.20). The student understands the impact of science and technology on society in
the United States (5.23).The student understands the influences of science and technology on
contemporary societies (6.20). The student understands the impact of scientific discoveries
and technological innovations on the political, economic, and social development of Texas
(7.20). The student understands the impact of science and technology on the economic
development of the United States (8.27). The student understands the impact of scientific
discoveries and technological innovations on daily life in the United States (8.28). The student
understands how major scientific and mathematical discoveries and technological innovations
affected societies prior to 1750 (WH27). The student understands how major scientific and
mathematical discoveries and technological innovations have affected societies from 1750 to
the present (WH28). The student understands the impact of technology and human
modifications on the physical environment (WG19). The student understands how current
technology affects human interaction (WG20). The student understands the impact of science,
technology, and the free enterprise system on the economic development of the United States
(US27). The student understands the influence of scientific discoveries, technological
innovations, and the free enterprise system on the standard of living in the Unites States
(US28).
The student understands the impact of scientific
discoveries and technological innovations on
daily life in the United States (8.28).
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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TEKS Vertical Alignment – Example
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
make predictions about future social, economic, cultural, and environmental impacts that may result from future
scientific discoveries and technological innovations (6)
compare types and uses of technology, past and present (7)
analyze the effects of various scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the development of Texas
such as advancements in the agricultural, energy, medical, computer, and aerospace industries (7)
evaluate the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the use of resources such as fossil
fuels, water, and land (7)
analyze how scientific discoveries and technological innovations have resulted in an interdependence among
Texas, the United States, and the world (7)
explain the effects of technological and scientific innovations such as the steamboat, the cotton gin, and
interchangeable parts (8)
analyze the impact of transportation and communication systems on the growth, development, and urbanization
of the United States (8)
analyze how technological innovations changed the way goods were manufactured and marketed, nationally and
internationally (8)
explain how technological innovations brought about economic growth such as how the factory system
contributed to rapid industrialization and the Transcontinental Railroad led to the opening of the west (8)
compare the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations that have influenced daily life in
different periods in U.S. history (8)
identify examples of how industrialization changed life in the United States (8)
identify the origin and diffusion of major ideas in mathematics, science, and technology that occurred in river
valley civilizations, classical Greece and Rome, classical India, and the Islamic caliphates between 700 and 1200
and in China from the Tang to Ming dynasties (WH)
summarize the major ideas in astronomy, mathematics, and architectural engineering that developed in the Maya,
Inca, and Aztec civilizations (WH)
explain the impact of the printing press on the Renaissance and the Reformation in Europe (WH)
•• compare the effects of scientific discoveries and
•
technological innovations that have influenced daily life
•
in different periods in U.S. history (8)
••• identify examples of how industrialization changed life
in the United States (8)
•
•
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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TEKS Curriculum Frameworks
STAAR Reporting Categoy
Assessed
TEKS
Essence
Statement
Prerequisite
Skills
40
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Essence Statements
STAAR
Reporting
Category
Three of the four
essence statements
are NEW this year.
Assessed
TEKS
Essence
Statement
41
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Essence Statements
• Prerequisite skill targets have been added to the
Essence Statement documents to inform teachers
as to the grade-level link for the tasks
Assessed essence statements
are lettered ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’
42
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Standardized Assessment Tasks
STAAR Reporting Category
Assessed
TEKS
Essence
Statement
43
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Standardized Assessment Tasks
• Some tasks measure only part of the prerequisite skill.
• Three predetermined criteria are identified and must be
observed.
44
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Assessment Tasks
Definitions and Examples
• The Definitions and
Examples pages for the
assessment tasks have
been expanded.
• These pages proceed
each essence
statement and provide
valuable information
and ideas for the tasks.
45
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Assessment tasks and Essence
statements are posted
46
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
What is the difference between the
complexity levels?
Complexity Level 3
• Most complex
• Application
Complexity Level 2
• Moderately complex
• Basic Recall
Complexity Level 1
• Least complex
• Beginning Awareness
NRO
• No Response Observed
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
47
Complexity Level 3
Application of Knowledge
Level 3 Complexity Level
Student:
Decides which materials are needed for a specific task
on his or her own or from a wide array of appropriate
and inappropriate options
Develops or adjusts strategies to accomplish a specific
task
Interprets or analyzes information
Formulates original responses to questions requiring
higher-level thinking skills
48
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Complexity Level 3
• Complexity Level 3 assessment tasks are the most complex and
involve applying knowledge beyond basic recall.
• Some of the skills students at this level are expected to demonstrate
may include:
• determining distinguishing features, organizing information,
comparing components, generating ideas, making inferences, and
justifying answers.
No choices can be given.
The student must demonstrate the skill “on his or her own.”
• Level 3 requires a student to:
•
•
•
•
internalize skills beyond basic recall
use higher–level thinking skills
arrive at answers “on his or her own” as choices cannot be provided
gather information or demonstrate skills using a wide array of materials
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
49
Assessment Task Example
Complexity Level 3
STAAR Reporting Category 4 (8.28)
Essence Statement D
Level 3
Prerequisite skill: describe how scientific discoveries and innovations such as
in aerospace, agriculture, energy, and technology have benefited individuals,
businesses, and society in Texas
The student will generate a list of energy sources in Texas. From the list, the
student will select an energy source that he or she would like to research.
Using reference materials, the student will generate a presentation about the
energy source. The student will determine ways the energy source impacts his
or her daily life.
Predetermined Criteria
1. The student will generate a list of energy sources in Texas.
2. The student will generate a presentation about the energy source.
3. The student will determine ways the energy source impacts his/her daily
life.
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
50
Complexity Level 2
Basic understanding
Level 2 Complexity Level
Student:
Correctly makes choices when at least three options are
provided
Distinguishes the varying characteristics of items
Answers literal questions posed to him or her
Recalls information previously learned
51
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Complexity Level 2
• Complexity Level 2 assessment tasks are moderately complex
and involve recalling information.
• Some of the skills students at this level are expected to demonstrate
may include:
• identifying or sorting elements, assisting in procedures, choosing
options, matching components, replicating information, and
examining features.
Choices are always provided.
• Level 2 requires a student to:
• demonstrate only a basic understanding of information
• recall or reproduce information
• arrive at answers when at least three choices are provided
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
52
Assessment Task Example
Complexity Level 2
STAAR Reporting Category 4 (8.28)
Essence Statement D
Level 2
Prerequisite skill: explain how science and technology change the ways in
which people meet basic needs
The student will identify an example of technology. The student will assist in
using the technology. The student will identify one way in which the
technology helps people in daily life.
Predetermined Criteria
1. The student will identify an example of technology.
2. The student will assist in using the technology.
3. The student will identify one way in which the technology helps people in
daily life.
53
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Complexity Level I
Beginning Awareness
Level 1 Complexity Level
Student:
Authentically responds to stimuli after experiencing
them through the senses
Is unable to make a choice when two options are
offered
Cannot answer questions posed to him or her
Communicates in subtle changes in affect or body
movement
54
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Complexity Level 1
• Complexity Level 1 assessment tasks are the least complex and
involve responding to knowledge at the beginning awareness level.
• Some of the skills students at this level are expected to demonstrate
may include:
• acknowledging features, responding to stimuli, participating in
processes, exploring materials, and anticipating outcomes.
No choices are allowed since the student is not required to
make decisions based on the information.
• Level 1 tasks often measure skills building up to the essence
statement.
• Level 1 requires a student to :
• be aware of the task as it is occurring
• be aware of a change in stimuli but not be required to act on the stimuli
• be aware of information but not make choices or decisions based on the
information
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
55
Assessment Task Example
Complexity Level 1
STAAR Reporting Category 4 (8.28)
Essence Statement D
Level 2
Prerequisite skill: identify examples of technology used in the home and
school
The student will be presented an example of technology. The student will
acknowledge the technology. As the technology is demonstrated, the student
will respond to the demonstration. The student will participate in using the
technology.
Predetermined Criteria
1. The student will acknowledge the technology.
2. The student will respond to the demonstration.
3. The student will participate in using the technology.
56
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
NRO – No Response Observed
No Response Observed (NRO)
Student:
Is unable to make an authentic response to any stimuli
Moves due to internal stimuli rather than stimuli
presented to him or her
Tracks or fixates on objects that are not part of the task
Vocalizes intermittently before, during, and after the
task
57
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
NRO – No Response Observed
• The No Response Observed (NRO)
designation can be used if the student is
unable to display any observable change in
affect or movement due to an ongoing
medical condition or the severity of the
student’s disability.
• If a student can provide an authentic
response to any of the predetermined
criterion in an assessment task the NRO
designation is not appropriate.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
58
NRO – No Response Observed
• Students in the NRO category typically do
not respond to any academic stimuli
throughout the day.
• This designation is not for the student who
refuses to respond.
• An NRO assessment is not considered a
failure and is not part of AYP ratings.
59
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
NRO – No Response Observed
• If the ARD committee selects NRO as the
complexity level for all the tasks
• The test administrator must plan one Level 1 task per
subject and attempt the observation to verify that the
student cannot authentically respond to the academic
stimuli.
• If the student is able to respond during the assessment
observation, the test administrator must request an
ARD meeting to review the student’s IEP and
assessment decisions so Level 1 can be considered.
60
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
“Student Characteristics for the STAAR
Alternate Complexity Levels”
• The ARD committee
must use this chart to
find the best
description of the
student’s performance
before determining
the complexity level or
combinations of levels
to be used for the
assessment.
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
61
Indicators of Progress
No Response Observed (NRO)
Student:
 Is unable to make an authentic
response to any academic stimuli
 Moves due to internal stimuli rather
than stimuli presented to him or her
 Tracks or fixates on objects that are
not part of the task
 Vocalizes intermittently before,
during, and after the task
Combinations
of NRO and
Level 1 are
NOT allowed.
Level 1 Complexity Level
Student:
 Authentically responds to stimuli
after experiencing them through the
senses
 Is unable to make a choice when two
options are offered
 Cannot answer questions posed to
him or her
 Communicates in subtle changes in
affect or body movement
Indicators of Progress for Level 1
Student:
 Begins to show response to a stimuli
belatedly or inconsistently
 Becomes still or remains quiet when a
specific noise or item is near
 Increases vocalizations or movements in the
presence of a specific stimuli
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
Level 1 will be
the decision.
62
Indicators of Progress
Level 1 Complexity Level
Level 2 Complexity Level
Student:
 Authentically responds to stimuli after
experiencing them through the senses
 Is unable to make a choice when two
options are offered
 Cannot answer questions posed to him
or her
 Communicates in subtle changes in
affect or body movement
Student:
 Correctly makes choices when at least
three options are provided
 Distinguishes the varying
characteristics of items
 Answers literal questions posed to him
or her
 Recalls information previously learned
Combinations
of Level 1 and
Level 2 are
allowed.
Indicators of Progress for Level 2
Student:
 Begins to show interest and seeks out the
same object or task
 Focuses on and more readily acknowledges
objects or representations
 Performs tasks similar to Level 2 tasks in daily
instruction
 Needs less cueing and prompting for Level 1
tasks
Provided by ESC Region XI (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)
63
Indicators of Progress
Level 2 Complexity Level
Student:
 Correctly makes choices when at least
three options are provided
 Distinguishes the varying characteristics
of items
 Answers literal questions posed to him
or her
 Recalls information previously learned
Combinations of
Level 2 and
Level 3 are
allowed.
Level 3 Complexity Level
Student:
 Decides which materials are needed for
a specific task on his or her own or from
a wide array of appropriate and
inappropriate options
 Develops or adjusts strategies to
accomplish a specific task
 Interprets or analyzes information
 Formulates original responses to
questions requiring higher-level
thinking skills
Indicators of Progress for Level 3
Student:
 Begins to see relationships between groups
 Can sometimes predict outcomes
 Provides responses without choices
 Needs less cueing and prompting for Level 2
tasks
 Performs tasks similar to Level 3 tasks in daily
instruction
Texas Education Agency's Student Assessment Division
64
Step 2: Implement the Assessment
Task
• Print out the appropriate pre-populated
“STAAR Alternate Documentation Form
of Student Performance”
• Consult the “Presentation
Supports/Materials”
document to determine
the appropriate supports
and materials
• Consult the “Ways to
Demonstrate the Verbs”
document to determine
how the student will
respond for each of the
predetermined criterion
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
65
Assessment Tasks vs.
Documentation Forms
• Assessment task documents should be
used as the main source for viewing the
assessment tasks.
• The documentation forms have the tasks
listed on them, but do not provide the rich
information for teachers that will assist
them in planning the administration of the
state-provided task.
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
STAAR Alternate
Documentation Forms
The link to the
documentation
forms will not be
posted until
November 15th.
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
“STAAR Alternate Documentation
Form of Student Performance”
Preplanned
Presentation
Supports/Materials
Allow access to the
assessment task
Student Response
Modes
Allow the student to
demonstrate the skill as
independently as
possible
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
68
Required Documentation Forms
Presentation Supports and
Materials
Student
Response Modes
Accommodations that provide access for an individual student
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
69
“Presentation Supports and
Materials for STAAR Alternate”
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
“Ways to Demonstrate the Verbs”
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Template for Planning Assessment
Tasks
72
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Required Documentation Forms
Record a description of materials
provided during instruction –
different than those used for the
observation
73
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Task Specific Change in Materials
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Step 3: Observe and Document
Student Performance
• After the observation has been planned
and recorded on the first page of the
documentation form, the test
administrator is ready to conduct the
observation.
• Conduct the assessment observation
with a focus on the predetermined
criteria
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
75
Conducting the Observation
• The test administrator can only conduct
three observations, if necessary, and will
determine which one of the three will be
used for the evaluation.
• Any started observation will count as one
of the three total number of observations
regardless of whether the observation was
completed or not.
76
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
“Hierarchy of Cueing and Prompting”
• Test administrators must use the terminology provided
in this document when evaluating student
performance and recording Level of Support.
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Cues
Verbal Direct Cue
Visual Cue
Pointing
Physical Gesture
Least Invasive – Most Invasive
Verbal Indirect Cue
Prompts
Verbal Direction
Gesture Assist
Visual Graphic
Student Modeling
Adult Modeling
Physical Assist
78
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
PowerPoint Refresher Courses
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Step 3: Observe and Document
Student Performance
• Record the date of the completed
Primary Observation
• Record the student’s performance for
each predetermined criterion under
• Demonstration of Skill
• Level of Support (Independent,
Cueing, Prompting)
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
STAAR Alternate Documentation
Form of Student Performance
• Primary observation
• Date (only three
attempts allowed)
• Demonstration of skill
• Level of Support
• Generalization of skill
• Date
• Demonstration of skill
• Level of Support
• Change of Materials
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
81
Required Documentation Forms
Demonstration of Skill
Did the student demonstrate the skill as the teacher
expected in the response modes?
Level of Support
How much additional assistance did the student need
beyond the preplanned supports?
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
STAAR Alternate Documentation
Form of Student Performance
• Description of
materials/approach
provided during
instruction.
• Description of the
change in materials
for generalization.
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Required Documentation Forms
Change of Materials
Materials provided during
instruction
How materials were changed
for generalization.
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
84
Change in Materials from Primary
to Generalization
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Step 4: Evaluate Student
Performance
• Evaluate the student’s performance in
the online system using your
observation notes
• Check the online system to see if the
student earned the opportunity for
Generalization of Skill (N/A for Level 1)
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Scoring Rubric
• The evaluation
submitted by the test
administrator is scored
in the Assessment
Management System
according to the rubric
and a total score is
determined for the
subject.
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Online Evaluation
Did the student
demonstrate the skill?
How did the student
perform the skill?
Yes or
No
Independently
Needed Cueing
Needed Prompting
Needed Prompting = 0 points
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Step 4: Evaluate Student
Performance
• Conduct the generalization observation
using the same task and all three
predetermined criteria
• Record the date of the completed
Generalization Observation
• Record the student’s performance for
each predetermined criterion
89
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
What is Generalization?
• Generalization allows the student to
demonstrate that he or she has internalized
the skills by applying them in a new context.
For a student with a cognitive disability, this
demonstrates true mastery.
L3 or L2 w/out
Prompting =
Generalization
L1 = NO
Generalization
90
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Generalization Online Evaluation
91
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
STAAR Alternate Documentation
Form of Student Performance
• All documentation forms used to evaluate
student performance must be securely stored
according to district policy by the close of the
assessment window 7:00 PM (CT), April 19
92
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Questions???
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Changes to Resources
• All resources, including the manuals, have
been updated with the most up-to-date
information.
• The new security oath has been posted.
• Documents have been updated to reflect the
EOC courses to be assessed this year:
•
•
•
•
Algebra I
English I and English II
Biology
US History
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
94
Changes to Resources – Archives
• Assessment resources from last year have
been added to a new Archive section at
the bottom of the Resources webpage.
• Assessment tasks
• Curriculum Framework documents
• Performance Level Descriptors for English III,
Geometry, World History, and World
Geography
95
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Results from 2012-2013
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Results for the 2012-2013
Administration of STAAR Alternate
2011-2012
2012-2013
86, 963
93, 438
55
67
86, 149
92, 313
Partial Score
61
102
No Response Observed
698
956
Complexity Level 3
11%
12%
Complexity Level 2
55%
58%
Complexity Level 1
34%
29%
Number of Assessments
Not Assessed
Complete Score
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
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Performance Data for 2014
• The adjusted cut score of 48 will be
applied to the 2014 results to comply with
House Bill 906 of the 83rd Legislative
Session.
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Performance Data for 2014
• The student’s Confidential Student Report
will also report growth between 2013 and
2014.
• Growth results will be
calculated using a
stage change table
and reported as Did
Not Meet, Met, or
Exceeded Growth.
99
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Future Development
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Impact of Recent Legislation
• House Bill 5 of the 83rd Legislative Session called
for a redesign of the State of Texas Assessments
of Academic Readiness (STAAR®) Alternate
assessment.
“ The agency, in conjunction with appropriate interested
persons, shall redevelop assessment instruments adopted
or developed under Subsection (b) for administration to
significantly cognitively disabled students in a manner
consistent with federal law. An assessment instrument
under this subsection may not require a teacher to prepare
tasks or materials for a student who will be administered
such an assessment instrument.”
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
101
ARD Committee Decisions
for Next Year
• The new assessment will be an item based
test; There will no complexity levels
• Participation requirements may change
but the test will not be expanded to
include the “modified” assessment
• ARD Committees can only decide if the
student requires an alternate assessment
due to instruction based on alternate
achievement standards
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
102
Development Plans
Pilot Study
Volunteers needed!
• To volunteer your district, contact a STAAR
Alternate team member at 512-463-9536
or [email protected]
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Anything else?
• Check the STAAR Alternate Resources page
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assess
ment/special-ed/staaralt/
Contact Student
Assessment
512-463-9536
[email protected]
104
ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)
Education Service Center Region XI
Assessment Contacts
• Laura Carson – Coordinator for Curriculum,
Instruction and Assessment
(817) 740-7573 or [email protected]
• Peggy DeMoss – Federal and State Assessment
(817) 740-7529 or [email protected]
• Sharon Rutherford – Special Education
Assessment
(817) 740-7574 or [email protected]
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ESC Region 11 Fort Worth, Texas (Source: TEA Student Assessment)

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