Understanding by Design and the NESD

Report
June 20 and August 29, 2012
Constructing
knowledge is the
foundation of all
learning.
The purpose of today is to:
 Develop
an awareness of renewed
curriculum direction
 Construct an understanding of
Understanding by Design (UbD) as a
planning process and how it impacts
instruction and assessment
 Examine the work of the NESD and how
this work can assist you in actualizing the
renewed curricula
9:00 – 9:45
9:45 – 10:30
10:30 – 10:45
10:45 – 12:00
12:00 – 12:45
12:45 – 1:50
1:50 – 2:00
2:00 – 2:30
2:30 – 3:00
Welcome, Motivational Set,
Activating Prior Knowledge
Curriculum Renewal
UbD Stage One
Nutrition break
UbD Stage One Continued
UbD Stage Two
Lunch
UbD Stage Two Continued
Nutrition break
UbD Stage Three
NESD Supports, Parking Lot and
Reflection
Please
fill out
Attach your mailing
address
 Find
someone to work with who does not
work at the same school as you.
 Look at the package of student exemplars.
Carefully read one or two and scan the
others.



What grade did these exemplars emerge from?
What time of year do you think they were
written? Does this matter?
How much will learning have progressed for
these students by the end of grade twelve? In
what areas? How do you know?
Renewed
curricula and
our work together in the
NESD has helped us to
clarify answers to these
questions.



Forming groups: Stand up and arrange yourselves in
a line according to hair length.
Based on your order, form pairs.
In pairs, generate statements of understanding
about the following topics (write one idea per
sticky note):
 Understanding by Design (UbD) or Backwards
Planning
 Components of renewed curricula (what has
changed)
 Assessment and reporting
Join
with another pair to make
a group of four. Share your
ideas/ thoughts.
Consider questions your group
still has.
Be prepared to share two
questions with the larger group
to add to our Parking Lot.
• Students are processed in batches
• All are processed at same rate
• Preset curriculum delivered to all in
bite sized pieces in a preset order
Skills:
• Punctuality
• Following instructions
• Recognizing the authority of
the
supervisor
• Working on monotonous tasks
for a long period of time
New Competencies: The
world our students will
enter into is a world we
cannot imagine right
now. The information
they will need is
information we do not
even have. Therefore,
importance shifts to:
• Learning how to
learn
• Problem solving
• Teamwork
Find
a partner who has brought
a different curricular document
from the one you have.
Look through the documents,
and on a sticky note, identify
similarities in both documents.
Be prepared to share.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Broad Areas of Learning (BAL)
Cross-curricular Competencies (CCC)
Outcomes and Indicators
Active Construction of Meaning
Inquiry Based Learning
Deeper Understanding
Higher Level Questioning
Metacognition
Curricular Alignment
 Outcomes
and indicators have been written
to make First Nations, Métis, and Inuit ways
of knowing, knowledge, and perspectives
foundational in the curriculum
 Resources are evaluated and recommended
with a conscious effort to be inclusive and
reflect this foundation








Focus on strategies
Shift from what we are teaching to what
students are learning
Continuous assessment and adjustment
Holding back on telling “the right answer”
Willingness to say “I’m not sure”
Starting with and returning to the big picture
Open and probing questions
Inquiry and learning for deep understanding
takes time.
Previous documents
 Grade
8 ELA – 247
objectives
 Revise final drafts
to ensure that
each paragraph
has a topic
sentence, a body
and a concluding
sentence.
New documents
 Grade
8 ELA – 19
outcomes
 Appraise own and
other’s work for
clarity,
correctness, and
variety.
Previous documents
 Grade
9 Science –
91 objectives
 Identify parallel
branches and
series branches
within a circuit.
New documents
 Grade
9 Science –
15 outcomes
 Analyze the
relationships that
exist among
voltage, current,
and resistance in
series and parallel
circuits.



Why do we teach dance? What do we hope
students will gain from engaging in this
learning experience?
Why do we revise our communication before
publishing and sharing it? What do we hope
students will gain from revising their work?
Why do we invite students to explore
electricity? How will this help them to
understand their world? What can we learn
from exploring relationships in science?
WA 10.10 Apply proportional reasoning to solve
problems involving unit pricing and currency exchange.
Money is a symbol that represents
value. The value of money is not
fixed; it is variable. What
factors impact the value of
money?
Unit pricing speaks to the
persuasive power of numbers
eg. $3.99 vs $4.00
Consider:
 Which
aspects of the
information so far is news to
you?
 Which aspects are old news?








Curriculum is designed by UbD
Inquiry is inherent in process
It is a process by which we can come to
understand the curriculum
Encourages higher level thinking
Encourages deep understanding and
demonstration of understanding.
UbD is based on outcomes and indicators
Unpacking process explicitly uncovers what
students need to know, do and ultimately, come
to understand as a result of this knowing and
doing
Assists in the continuum of learning across
grades
 Stage
One – Unpacking the outcomes (Direct
curriculum focus)
 Stage Two – Assessment (Tools and Events)
 Stage Three – Learning Plan and Reflection
(Inquiry, Instructional Strategies, Learning
Strategies, Differentiated Instruction,
Environment, Motivational Set and
Continuous Engagement)
Unpacking the outcomes
FOCUS IS ON LEARNING
 An outcome is a statement of what
students are expected to know and be able
to do by the end of a course in a particular
area of study. Outcomes are not optional.
 Indicators represent the breadth and the
depth of the outcome and are
representative of what students need to
know and/or be able to do in order to
achieve an outcome.
 Doctor example



To fully understand what is required of students
to understand the outcome…
To determine what teachers need to know to
help students demonstrate their understanding
of the outcome.
To invite teachers to design personal, powerful
learning and assessment experiences that will
engage students and help students learn the
outcome.
To Clearly See the
Learning Destination!
Unpacking the Outcome
Create  dance compositions
Express  ideas about Saskatchewan
Use  collaborative inquiry
Use  movement problem-solving
Outcome (circle the verb and underline the qualifiers)
CP 4.1 Create dance compositions that express ideas about Saskatchewan using collaborative inquiry and movement problemsolving.
KNOW
UNDERSTAND
 Saskatchewan sources – local stories,
 We can show/ express aspects of life
personal experience, land and
and history through the arts (dance)
geography, feelings, memories, music,
 Effectively working with others can help
observation, imagination
the creative process
 Ways to record ideas – journal, drawings,  Recording our creative processes helps
videos, photographs
us to remember, develop and generate
ideas
 Vocabulary – collaboration, dance
phrase, movement problem-solving,
 Creativity is about building onto existing
composition, meaning, repeating,
ideas
contrasting
 Our creativity can begin in many ways
 Ways to effectively work in teams and
 Dance is a combination of repeated and
pairs, share ideas, etc.
contrasting movements, often
 Places to research ideas for danceorganized into phrases
making and ways to effectively research  Saskatchewan is rich with culture and
and use information gained
history
 Strategies for self-reflection
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
How can we represent Saskatchewan life in a dance composition?
How and why should I work with others?
How can I remember what I create? How can I expand on ideas?
How can I be creative? What does it mean to be creative?
How can dances be made?
How is Saskatchewan inspirational?
BE ABLE TO DO
 Collaborate on dance compositions
 Use Sask. Sources to springboard
 Select starting points for dance compositions
 Use research to guide dance making
 Improvise to generate and develop movement
ideas
 Select movement
 Engage in movement problem-solving
 Sequence repeating and contrasting dance
phrases
 Record dance and movement ideas
 Appraise own dance compositions – think
about meaning and unique expressions
 Reflect on choices made during and after
dance-making
Understand
Know
Do
A
Big Idea or Big Question (it can be
formed as either a statement or a
question) is big enough and important
enough that we would hope our
students continue to reflect on it for
their entire lives. It is also big enough
to likely be explored in more than one
subject area and could be part of
classroom discussions and reflection
for the entire year.
 Essential
Questions are also important
questions that should prompt many
answers and deep reflection. These kinds
of questions should remain important for
months at a time and will probably lead
to connections for students in future
learning. They often link to the
curriculum and ask students to reflect on
why the various outcomes are important.
In a unit of study, there will be several
essential questions that frame student
learning
 Enduring
understandings are similar to
essential questions in their depth. They
are statements of understanding we hope
students will come to as a result of the
learning experiences they have in our
classes. They, too, link more directly to
the curriculum and the reasons for
exploring the outcomes. They often begin
with, “Students will understand that…”
There should be several enduring
understandings we hope students come to
in a single unit of study.
Previous examples
When do you use
capital letters?
 What is an improper
fraction?
 What is the definition
of democracy?
 What is an
invertebrate?

Essential Questions





How does message impact
craft, word choice and
structure of texts?
How do I know how to
revise?
How can different numbers
show the same amount?
Can undemocratic practices
exist in a democratic
society?
How does classifying
organisms help us make
predictions?
Do: Demonstrate the proper procedure when
reporting an unintentional injury.
 Know: 1) How to recognize an injury 2)Places in
the shop where injury is most likely to occur.
 Understand: 1) That critically analyzing potential
risks everyday prevents injury 2) That analyzing
risks takes time and consideration.
 Essential questions: 1) How can I prevent injury?
2) Why should I take time to examine my
environment?

Do: Describe local community examples of
barter/trade/sharing
 Know: Definition of barter, trade, share, resource,
industry; details of local community commerce
 Understand: That barter, trade and sharing were
the basis of traditional economies and they are
still part of our modern economy.
 Essential question: 1) How has bartering, trading
and sharing affected economies in the past and
present? 2) How can I recognize them?

 There
are some additional supports
available to assist with the planning
in this subject area.
 There are steps that we take prior
to thinking about knows, dos and
understands  we need to create
contexts for thinking about these
elements of UbD
 The outcomes don’t quite tell us
enough.
Together
let’s examine
the given outcome and
practice determining
know, do, understand and
essential questions.
 What
are the most straightforward
parts?
 What are the most challenging
parts?
 What comes directly from the
curriculum?
 What aspects of unpacking are not
directly from the curriculum?
 In
your groups, look at an outcome
that is already unpacked.
 Compare it to the outcome in the
curriculum.
 Where did the information come
from?
 What does an unpacking sheet allow
you to do? How does it inform your
practice?
Unpacking the Outcome
Create  dance compositions
Express  ideas about Saskatchewan
Use  collaborative inquiry
Use  movement problem-solving
Outcome (circle the verb and underline the qualifiers)
CP 4.1 Create dance compositions that express ideas about Saskatchewan using collaborative inquiry and movement problemsolving.
KNOW
UNDERSTAND
 Saskatchewan sources – local stories,
 We can show/ express aspects of life
personal experience, land and
and history through the arts (dance)
geography, feelings, memories, music,
 Effectively working with others can help
observation, imagination
the creative process
 Ways to record ideas – journal, drawings,  Recording our creative processes helps
videos, photographs
us to remember, develop and generate
ideas
 Vocabulary – collaboration, dance
phrase, movement problem-solving,
 Creativity is about building onto existing
composition, meaning, repeating,
ideas
contrasting
 Our creativity can begin in many ways
 Ways to effectively work in teams and
 Dance is a combination of repeated and
pairs, share ideas, etc.
contrasting movements, often
 Places to research ideas for danceorganized into phrases
making and ways to effectively research  Saskatchewan is rich with culture and
and use information gained
history
 Strategies for self-reflection
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
How can we represent Saskatchewan life in a dance composition?
How and why should I work with others?
How can I remember what I create? How can I expand on ideas?
How can I be creative? What does it mean to be creative?
How can dances be made?
How is Saskatchewan inspirational?
BE ABLE TO DO
 Collaborate on dance compositions
 Use Sask. Sources to springboard
 Select starting points for dance compositions
 Use research to guide dance making
 Improvise to generate and develop movement
ideas
 Select movement
 Engage in movement problem-solving
 Sequence repeating and contrasting dance
phrases
 Record dance and movement ideas
 Appraise own dance compositions – think
about meaning and unique expressions
 Reflect on choices made during and after
dance-making
Assessment
Assessment
Tool – in the NESD,
we have primarily adopted a
rubric as the preferred tool. It is
based directly on the outcomes.
Assessment Event – the many
ways the outcome can be
measured.
Understanding
is not yes or
no; it is a matter of degree.
It is a continuum!
 Clarify
the learning destination
before day-to-day planning occurs
through establishing criteria.
 Help students to see exactly where
the learning is headed.
 Can be used formatively as well as
summatively.
 Articulate how learning can
continue.
Criteria - What will students need to do in
order to demonstrate the knowledge and
skills required in this outcome? (Focus on
the verb in the outcome)
Performance standards - What is the
continuum of learning for this outcome?
What will it look like?
Analyze personal
eating practices

Fully meeting grade level
expectations with enriched
understanding
Fully meeting grade level
expectations
Mostly meeting grade level
expectations
Not yet meeting grade level
expectations
You show a strong and in
depth understanding of your
personal eating practices
and can make strong
connections between how,
what and when you eat and
your overall health.
On your own, you show you can
recognize the kinds of food you
eat, when you eat and why you
eat the way you do. You can
back up your ideas with details
and examples and your
explanation and reasoning is
clear.
With help, you can somewhat
identify your personal eating
practices and give some details
to support your ideas. Spend
some more time thinking
specifically about what, how
and when you eat and how it
affects your health.
You are having trouble
showing you understand your
own eating practices and
how they affect your health.
What does it mean to eat
healthily? How can you keep
track of your own eating?
How are the two things
connected?
Key verb – Analyze, which means examining relationships,
making connections and supporting ideas with examples,
details and explanations.
Fully meeting
grade level
expectations
with enriched
understanding
Fully meeting
grade level
expectations
Mostly meeting
grade level
expectations
Not yet meeting
grade level
expectations
Timely
and specific
feedback is the greatest
contributing factor to
growth in learning and
skills.
Fully meeting grade level
expectations with
enriched understanding
You show a thorough
Show
understanding of all
understanding of aspects of change during
responsibilities puberty and how you and
associated with others may choose to
changes during accept responsibility for
puberty
actions and behaviours
during this time. You
support your ideas with
correct vocabulary and
strong detail.
Fully meeting grade level
expectations
Mostly meeting grade level
expectations
Not yet meeting grade
level expectations
On your own, you can show
adequate understanding of
the changes of puberty and
how you can take
responsibility for your actions
and behaviours during this
time, and where you can go
for support and information.
You use correct and
respectful language around
this topic.
With help, you can show an
understanding of some aspects of
change during puberty and some of
the ways a person can take
responsibility for actions and
behaviours during these changes.
Spend more time learning about all
the kinds of changes a person may
experience and how you can
support yourself during this time.
You are having trouble
showing you
understand puberty
and what to do for
yourself when it
happens. When can
you go for
information? How can
you organize your
understanding so it
makes sense?
Checklists
Highlighting
Clarifying
criteria
(within criteria)
Using only part of a
rubric at a time



Authentic assessment clearly assesses the
outcomes in a context that reflects the
actual learning experience. In other words,
we assess in the exact same way we have
invited students to learn.
Authentic assessment also invites us to ask
how students may come to apply the
knowledge and skills they have gained and
assess them based on that information.
Handbook - http://curriculum.nesd.ca/
Experimenting with Colour
PPK.1 Analyze the effects of various forms of energy, including light, sound, waves, head, and magnetism, and the
effects of forces.
Here’s how we did it . . .
Elliott – We needed milk and we needed some milk and we needed some dish wash.
Lukas – We put the milk in. And then we put the colours in.
Keely – For our experiment, first we got a bowl and then we got milk, we poured the milk into the bowl and then what we
did, we put all the colours of food colouring in and then we got straws to blow it and then we put dish soap in.
What happened when we put the dish soap in?
Elliott – The colours moved and they changed to brown.
Lukas – It moved the colours.
We poured milk in.
We put in food colouring.
We blew it with a straw
 To
collect evidence to guide daily planning
(Assessment for Learning).
 To assist children in becoming aware of their
thinking (metacognition) and to make it visible by
documenting the learning process (Assessment as
Learning).
 To record evidence of children’s learning to report
to caregivers and to in-school and school division
administrators (Assessment of Learning).
Listen
and
Observe
Prepare
Learning
Document
Assess
Evaluate
How
do we decide on the time we
invest in an assessment event?
(Ex. Exam vs. Project; Poster vs.
Reflection)
Which assessment event makes
the most sense given the value of
our time together and the ways a
student will need to show their
learning?
 Strong
content – to elicit the right
performance from students
 Clarity – clear instructions and awareness of
criteria
 Feasibility – practical given the available
time and materials
 Fairness and accuracy – all students have a
chance to be successful, no bias
 Sampling – addresses the depth and breadth
of the outcome with just enough tasks
What
have we done?
(Tools and sample
events)
Where are we heading?
What is useful to me?
Explore
Student Name
USC 7.1
Assignments
Outcome
Focus Area
USC 7.2
USC 7.3
USC 7.4
USC 7.5
USC 7.6
USC 7.7
DM 7.8
DM 7.9
AP 7.10
Example 1
EX
ME
WA
Example 2
ME
ME
ME
Example 3
EX
ME
ME
Example 4
ME
ME
WA
Example 5
EX
ME
ME
Example 6
EX
ME
ME
EX
ME
Outcome result
Focus Area Result
EX
ME
ME
ME
USC
DM
AP
EX
ME
ME
New
curricula 
UbD  Criteria and
rubrics  Students
Achieve  Report
card
The Learning Plan and Reflection
What
learning experiences can I
structure in order to ensure
students will be able to
demonstrate their understanding
of the criteria?
The Learning Plan emerges from
the criteria.
Task #2
Goal: Comprehend & Respond: READING, listening
Compose & Create:
WRITING
Assess & Reflect
Essential Questions: What makes poetry fun to read?
What are some of the features of poetry?
Why is poetry a unique way to express you?
1. BEFORE: Use following questions as prompt for journal writing
entry: a) How many times have you been asked, “What do you want to
be when you grow up?” Make a list of ten possible answers-real or
funny.
b) Think of a poem or a rhyme that you can say off by heart.
Write it down and explain why you remember it.
c) What do you think about poetry? Explain why you feel the way
you do.
2. DURING: Read, “When I Grow Up” for enjoyment. On second
reading, identify message. (Reader response: Personal/Critical
thinking) Read a third time and listen for rhyme scheme to identify
pattern of rhyme (couplets).
3. AFTER: Discuss how rhyme pattern adds to the enjoyment of text
and distinguishes the writing form. Consider how rhyme links to
memory. Think of nursery rhymes you can say off by heart.
Identify other features of poetry (expresses strong
feelings/emotions; figurative language; concise, takes grammatical
liberties to reflect message, can be humorous, etc.)
4. AFTER: Experiment with rhyming words.
5. AFTER: Brainstorm some of the challenges of growing up. What
changes and challenges are you facing? What are some of the pros
and cons of getting older? What are some of the challenges you will
face in the future? Experiment with rhyming couplets, to express
some of the issues that come with growing up. Develop these ideas
into a poem. Self reflect on poetry writing. (see attachment)
Other Poetry/Song Selections
“Yesterday” (Cornerstone)
“Moths and Moons” (Collections: Looking for Answers)
“I Want to Be” (Collections: Looking for Answers)
“Sunrise, Sunset” (Fiddler on the Roof)
“Cats in the Cradle” (Harry Chapin)
“I Will Take Care of You” (Amy Skye)
“Butterfly Kisses” (Bob Carlisle)
Division of Whole Numbers Planning Log
Day
Hook/
Essential
Questions
Learning
Focus
Materials/
Resources
Activities
Assessment:
2
3
4
5
Question:
What do we
know about
Division?
1
Question:
Is it possible to
use
multiplication to
solve a division
problem?
Using
Multiplication
chart play “Mind
Reader”
Question: Why
does multiplying
by 0 produce 0
and dividing by 0
is not possible?
Question: Is it
possible to show
a division fact as
an array?
Pre-assessment:
Group 1: Pencil
and Paper
Group 2:
Performance
Assessment
Unit Launch:
Activate prior
learning about
whole numbers
to solve
problems.
Patterns In
Multiplication
and Division
Patterns In
Multiplication
and Division
Using doubling to
multiply and
halving to divide.
Base ten Blocks
Anecdotal record
sheet
Pre-assessment
activity sheet.
Graffiti board
Pearson Unit 3:
Multiplying and
Dividing Whole
Numbers. Unit
Launch pgs. 7071)
Lesson 1 in
Pearson Unit 3:
Multiplying and
Dividing Whole
Numbers. Lesson
1 (pgs. 72-73)
Overhead and
handouts of
multiplication
chart
Lesson 1 in
Pearson Unit 3:
Multiplying and
Dividing Whole
Numbers. Lesson
1 (pgs. 74-75)
Base Ten Blocks
Lesson 2 in
Pearson Unit 3:
Multiplying and
Dividing Whole
Numbers. Lesson
2 (pgs. 76-77)
1cm grid paper
Scissors
counters
Students will be
divided into two
groups and will
complete paper
and pencil
assessment and
performance task
assessment.
When finished
paper and pencil
assessment
students will
contribute to the
graffiti board.
In pairs, students
will solve a multitiered problem
requiring
students to use a
number of
operations as
well as
previously
learned
estimation
strategies.
See Lesson 1 to
introduce two
strategies on
how to multiply
and divide
Using
chalkboards
students will
practice
strategies
introduced.
Individual
assignment:
Any 4 practice
questions on pgs.
74 and 75.
Students will use
arrays of
counters to
demonstrate
understanding of
the relationship
of multiplication
to division.
Students will
practice halving
strategies to find
quotients.
Small group
practice
Pre-assessment:
paper and pencil
and performance
task
Checklist:
Can students
choose the
appropriate
operation to
solve a problems
with whole
numbers.
Exit Card:
Math Journal:
Students reflect
on what
strategies work
for them.
Class room work
Temperature of
class.
Self Assessment
Checklist
3-2-1
How does
multiplication
connect to
division?
A
philosophical approach to teaching and
learning
 Builds on students’ inherent sense of
curiosity and wonder
 Draws on students’ diverse background and
experiences
 Provides opportunities for students to
become active participants in a search for
meaning
In Emergent
Curriculum,
teachers plan in
response to the
children’s
interests and
concerns, and
curriculum
expands into
genuine inquiry,
as children and
teachers together
become
participatory colearners through
multiple ways of
learning and
creating (in
drawing, dance,
clay, wire, and so
forth) so that
new cultures of
identity and
classroom
citizenship
develop from it.
Emergent Curriculum in the
Primary Classroom,
Carol Anne Wien
 Stimulation
versus purposeful focused
learning
 Teacher crafted environment versus student
shared space
 Finished product versus process, strategies,
metacognition
 Teacher judgements versus student growth
and learning
 NESD
Rubric and Support Document
 Consultant Roles
 DI Facilitators
 Curriculum Corner
 http://curriculum.nesd.ca/
One
thing I learned
today…
One question I still
have…

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