Campus Improvement Plans & Coordinated School Health

Report
Campus Improvement Plan
Coordinated School Health
Language Guide/Checklist
Barney Fudge – Texas Education Agency
Michelle Smith-Texas Action for Healthy Kids
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
© 2009 by the Texas Education Agency
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Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Texas Education Code (TEC)
Section 11.253(d)(10)
(10) if the campus is an elementary, middle, or junior
high school, set goals and objectives for the
coordinated health program at the campus
based on:
(A) student fitness assessment data, including
any data from research-based assessments
such as the school health index assessment
and planning tool created by the federal
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;
(B) student academic performance data;
(C) student attendance rates;
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Texas Education Code (TEC)
Section 11.253(d)(10)
(10) if the campus is an elementary, middle, or junior
high school, set goals and objectives for the
coordinated health program at the campus based
on:
(D) the percentage of students who are
educationally disadvantaged;
(E) the use and success of any method to ensure
that students participate in moderate to vigorous
physical activity as required by Section 28.002(l);
and
(F) any other indicator recommended by the local
school health advisory council.
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
The law: If the campus is an elementary, middle or
junior high school, the campus improvement plan
must set goals and objectives for the coordinated
health program at the campus
• There are four programs that have been
approved by the TEA.
• Information on these programs can be found at
http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/curriculum/hpe/appro
vedcshp.html
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
• Every elementary school and middle school
in Texas is required to implement one of
these four programs or develop one of their
own based on criteria listed at the following
web site
http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter102/c
h102cc.html
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Examples:
• Our campus is currently implementing the CATCH
curriculum to fulfill our requirement regarding
coordinated school health.
• Our campus has developed and is implementing a
coordinated school health program that meets the
criteria identified by TEA.
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
• Has your campus planning committee
identified goals and objectives for your
coordinated school health program?
• This language can be as simple as stating
the timeline for implementation of
coordinated school health and how you
will show evidence of implementation.
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Examples
• We plan to implement our coordinated school health
program through ______________________ (could
be advisory/science/PE or other specified class).
Teachers will include evidence of lessons taught in
lesson plans.
• Our goal is to have a coordinated school health
program fully implemented in grades 6-8 by fall of
2013.
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
• The objective of our coordinated school
health program is to improve the campus
nutrition environment, ensure our students
are physically active, and encourage our
parents and staff to be positive role
models. We will accomplish this by: [state
planned activities and actions].
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
The law: Goals and objectives for coordinated
school health programs shall be based on:
(A) student fitness assessment data, including
any data from research-based
assessments such as the school health
index assessment and planning tool
created by the federal Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention;
(B) student academic performance data;
(C) student attendance rates;
(D) the percentage of students who are
educationally disadvantaged;
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Student Data
Does your campus planning committee
currently review student demographic
and fitness data?
• Reviewing student data will allow the
campus planning to make informed
recommendations for campus goals and
objectives.
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Example:
• Based on our campus data, we will develop a
program to improve nutrition and physical
activity on campus. This will include articles
in the campus newsletter, health and physical
activity posters, a campus-wide fitness event,
and implementation of a no-food fundraiser
policy. These actions are part of our
coordinated school health program plan.
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Student Participation in Moderate to Vigorous
Physical Activity
Example
• To address disciplinary/behavior issues, the campus planning
committee will introduce more opportunities for physical
activity during the school day.
Possible options
• Classroom teachers will provide activity breaks at least two
times per week for at least five minutes during advisory
period. These breaks will consist of....
• Students with good behavior will be allowed to participate in
open gym before school and/or during lunch.
• Results will be monitored based on subsequent years’
behavior and attendance rates
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Example
• Physical education teachers will ensure at
least 30 minutes of each PE class is
devoted to physical activity. Results of the
this will be evidenced in Fitnessgram data
reported in subsequent years.
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Other Indicators
• Your district School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) may
make additional recommendations of information that should
be reviewed by the campus planning committee. If you are not
aware of any recommendations, consult with your district
administration or SHAC chair.
Example
• The SHAC suggests that the campus planning committee
review information from the CDC on obesity rates in Texas
schools or national guidelines for physical activity from the
National Association of Sport and Physical Education.
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.
Questions?
• Barney Fudge – Texas Education Agency
[email protected]
• Michelle Smith-Texas Action for Healthy
Kids
[email protected]
Copyright TEA, 2009. All rights reserved.

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