Our Most Valuable Resource

Report
Tammy J. Rach
Senior Volunteer Manager
San Diego Zoo Global
[email protected]
Catherine Johansson
Training and Volunteer Operations
Georgia Aquarium
[email protected]
Kim Haas
Volunteer Program Supervisor
Woodland Park Zoo
[email protected]
Bill Davis
Volunteer Manager
The Toledo Zoo
[email protected]
Brooke Estes
Volunteer Manager
Birmingham Zoo
[email protected]

If you knew you could tap into a resource with
nearly unlimited potential that would take
your organization to the next level, would
you do it?

Define ‘Value’ & ‘Resource’

Animals?

Staff?

VOLUNTEERS

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

Reflection on our organizations
Passion
Commitment
Friend-Raising
Big Picture
ROM & ROI
Cross Section of Possibilities
Tips & Strategies
Strong Investment
Map to Maximizing on
Your Investment
50 AZA Accredited Organizations:
26,505 Volunteers + tens of thousands of auxiliary
volunteers
2010 Hours: 2,528,767+
$ Value added: $54,014,463+
107 Staff
1:248 Ratio

Are you doing the best you can with your
most valuable resource?
Dissecting #’s
Here is what we get just looking at
#’s:
2080 hours = 1 FTE, so 88,000 hours =
42FTE’s
National Volunteer Rate = $21.36
Hours Value = $1.9 Million
What do they cost on average?
$220/volunteer, or $3ish/hour @
SDZG and that cost decreases every
year, even with additional staff.
2008
1 Staff
250 Volunteers
17 Assignments
33,000 Hours
1-3 front line volunteers
for 4 hours/day
17 FTE’s
$838,000
853 Requests in 2009
2010
3 Staff
1100 Volunteers
80 Assignments
88,000 Hours
4-30 front line
volunteers, open to close
42.5 FTE’s
$2.1 million
1533 Requests
+BTS: 888% increase in volunteers
+BTS: 346% increase in hours
Human Resources
HR Staff to All Staff ratio
is approximately 1:100+
during peak season
and 1:72 during nonpeak season
SDZG HR staff each
have one primary
responsibility (benefits,
communication, etc.)
SDZG HR is closed on
weekends and holidays
Volunteer Services
Staff to Volunteer ratio
should be 1:100, but average
is 1:243. Of 50 AZA
organizations only ONE was
at 1:100
VS staff are usually all crosstrained in everything PLUS do
daily scheduling, training and
more.
VS is usually open 7days/week, holidays and
weekends
PEOPLE!!!
Individuals
Engagement
Intrinsic Value
Passion…
Who are our Volunteers?
Walter Goeddel
Age: 85
Recently Widowed
Donor
Who are our Volunteers?
Maureen Rosenblatt
Age: 31
Married to Active Military
Who are our Volunteers?
Stephane Vernhet, DVM
Age: 42
Origin: France
Veterinarian pursuing
passion for wildlife
preservation
Who are our Volunteers?
Krista Bown
Age: 45
Divorced Mother of Two
Marlene Medina
Age: 19
No Job Experience
Why do we love
volunteering? It
is about making
new friends,
interacting with
guests, and
being a happy
place.
At the world famous San
Diego Zoo the weather
is always fair. While you
are here don't forget to
kiss the bear.
"I enjoy volunteering with the
Zoo because it provides
me an opportunity to
engage in activities that I
cannot do in my day-today life. Although I would
love to work with primates
on a daily basis, it was not
a feasible career choice for
me. I really enjoy being
able to connect visitors
with the Zoo's messages
about primates and
conservation!"
“I volunteer for
love…
Love for
animals, love
for people,
love for
learning
and the love for
educating
others.”
“I and my family share in the amazing history of the San Diego Zoo. That is why I came here
to volunteer. Now…. It is my “happy place”. A place where I fill my desire for
accomplishment, educating, and giving back. At the end of each of my shifts I walk away
knowing I have made a difference. I feel confident that because of my time spent that day,
someone else will know that they can make a difference too. I have met world experts in
their fields, worked alongside incredible people, shared information with people from all
over the world, and had some wonderful one-of-a-kind experiences. “
Remember the big picture – it HAS to be
mutualistic – be realistic
Strong foundation
Database – BIG ONE!!!
Space, Atmosphere & Culture – Happy Place
Support your team – on-going interdepartmental support
Resources – mainly staff, who have the tools
they need to run effectively and efficiently
Rewards, Recognition and
APPRECIATION!!
A little support goes a LONG way, and you get
MUCH more than what you pay for
Best Practices (AZAVA = SO important..)
HAVE to have the RIGHT people on the bus:
Invested in your organization
Invested in your volunteers
Road paver, not road blocker
Managing volunteers often requires greater skills than
managing paid staff. They offer a channel for multiple
talents to be useful to others.
Don’t let your treasure remain buried in the
deep. Dig up your treasure chest, brush off the
barnacles and find the perfect key to unlocking
your greatest treasure. Chart your course and
set sail!! You hold the key…
The Future is Now:
Engaging Teen Volunteers to
Advance your Mission and
Build Community Relations
Bill Davis, M.A., MOL
Volunteer Manager
The Toledo Zoo
Attention all Riders and Elephants!
To challenge the AZA and its member organizations to increase
youth program support and engagement at our facilities to release
the immediately actionable potential of our youth volunteers.
Handout includes:
• Logical arguments (Info!)
• Sound conclusions (Info!)
• References (More info!)
Presentation includes:
• Photos!
• Videos!
• Warm Fuzzies!
•Current Societal Paradigm
•
•
Youth as problems (as opposed to being viewed as resources)
Adolescence as a period of "storm and stress"1
Risky
behaviors
Conflict
with
parents
Mood
disruptions
•
People gravitate towards the negative!2
Paradigm Shift
Donors
Voters
Ambassadors
Visitors
Activists
Volunteers
Members
Citizens
Confluence of Multiple Disciplines
Civic
Engagement
Identity
Development
Consumer
Behavior
Lifelong Supporters and Activists
Identity Formation and Influence
As Identities advance through the towards Achievement, they
become more stable and less influenced by peer pressure3, 4
Civic Engagement Process
•
•
•
Adolescence is critical
window for emergence5
Engaged youth become
Engaged adults6
Parents that volunteer
raise children that
volunteer7
Teens
that
volunteer
Children
that
volunteer
Adults
that
volunteer
Parents
that
volunteer
Consumer Behavior
•
•
Youth are Consumers; Teen
volunteers are Customers
Children are impacted by
parents and peers when they
are young8
•
•
Adolescents begin impacting
their peers and parents; they
are drivers
Consumer preferences can
remain intact for years9
How Do These Concepts Apply to
Zoos/Aquariums?
http://www.chumpysclipart.com/illustration/694/picture_of_a_confused_looking_leopard
http://www.fish4help.net/confused-fish.php
Our Missions Matter – Our Youth Matter
•
•
•
Education – inspire youth volunteers to learn and disseminate
knowledge, fostering awareness which can lead to action10
Conservation – develop youth (empowerment) and impact the
environment for short and long-term outcomes11
Community – promote civic engagement behaviors that will
remain a part of their identity into the future12
Final Thoughts
•
Zoos and Aquariums are in a unique position to help
adolescents develop a community-oriented, conservationdriven identity that will reinforce itself, and potentially expand,
as they mature through adulthood.
•
Teen volunteers can support our missions and engage our communities
now
•
Teen volunteers can support our missions and engage our communities
in the future
•
Teen volunteers can raise children (and grandchildren) with the same
values to support our missions and engage our communities forever
References
1.
Arnett, J.J. (1999). Adolescent storm and stress, reconsidered. American Psychologist, 54(5), 317 – 326.
2.
Heath, C., & Heath, D. (2010). Switch: How to change things when change is hard. Broadway Books,
New York.
3.
Erikson, E. (1963). Childhood and Society, 2nd ed. Norton, New York.
4.
Marcia, J.D. (1966). Development and validation of ego-identity status. Journal of Personality and
Social Psychology, 3(5), 551 – 558.
5.
Obradovic, J. & Masten, A.S. (2007). Developmental antecedents of young ault civic engagement.
Applied Developmental Science, 11(1), 2 – 19.
6.
Hardy, S.A., Pratt, M.W., Pancer, S.M., Olsen, J.A. & Lawford, H.L. (2010). Community and religious
involvement as contexts of identity change across late adolescence and emerging adulthood.
International Journey of Behavioral Development, 35(2), 125 – 135.
Otto, L.B. (1976). Social Integration and the status attainment process. American Journal o Sociology,
81, 1360 – 1383.
References
7.
Bekkers, R. (2007). Intergenerational transmission of volunteering. Acta Sociologica, 50(2), 99 – 114.
8.
Shim, S., Serido, J., & Barber, B.L. (2011). A consumer way of thinking: Linking consumer socialization
and consumption motivation perspectives to adolescent development. Journal of Research on
Adolescence, 21(1), 290 – 299.
9.
Ji, M. F. (2002). Children’s relationships with brands: “True love” or “one-night” stand? Psychology &
Marketing, 19(4), 369 – 387.
10.
Wray-Lake, L., Flanagan, C.A., & Osgood, D.W. (2010). Examining trends in adolescent environmental
attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors across three decades. Environment and Behavior, 42(1), 61 – 85.
11.
Schusler, T.M., Krasny, M.E., Peters, S.J. & Decker, D.J. (2009). Developing citizens and communities
through youth environmental action. Environmental Education Research, 15(1), 111 – 127.
12.
Smith, E.S. (1999). The effects of investments in the social capital of youth on political and civic behavior
in young adulthood: A longitudinal analysis. Political Psychology, 20(3), 553 – 580.
Catherine Johansson
[email protected]
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Staff need/request
Community Interest
Public Relations
Professional Development
Bottom line
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Short time frame
Different expectations
Unique legal & public relations
considerations
International applicants
Relocation needs
University relations
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Department contacts
Aggressive and targeted marketing
Intern database
Established screening process
Manual for department supervisors & interns
Training beyond Volunteer Orientation
Signed policy documents
Familiarity with international regulations
Professional & social opportunities
University relationships
Other Audience Suggestions?...
Feedback Forms
Specialized Reports
Public Relations Exposure
Transition to standard
Volunteer Program
 Grant applications
 Other Audience
Suggestions?...
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Volunteer
Management and
Today’s Volunteers
Brooke Estes
Volunteer Manager, Birmingham Zoo
 Volunteering can be an exciting, growing,
enjoyable experience. It is truly gratifying
to serve a cause, practice one's ideals,
work with people, solve problems, see
benefits, and know one had a hand in
them.
--Harriet Naylor
What do the Statistics
Say? (Who are Today’s
Volunteers?)
 Trends in Volunteering
 Overall Increase
 Volunteer Demographics
3 Factors to Consider in
Designing Volunteer Tasks
 Enjoyable
 Appropriately Challenging
 Significant
Everyone’s Involved…
 What happens when it’s not always the
Volunteer Manager deciding what
volunteer tasks are needed?
 Importance of training for all staff on how
to work with Volunteers
Recommended Practices
in Volunteer Management
 Practices Related to Retention:
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Training and Professional Development
Screening Volunteers, matching with tasks
Allocating Resources
Culture of Acceptance
Volunteer Participation in Recruitment
Volunteer Recognition
Resources
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“Capitalizing on Volunteers’ Skills: Volunteering by Occupation in America” (2008) The
Corporation for National and Community Service http://www.nationalservice.org
Eisner, D., Grimm Jr., R.T., Maynard, S., and Washburn, S. (2009) “The New Volunteer
Workforce” Stanford Social Innovation Review http://www.ssireview.com
Hager, M. A, and Brudney, J. L. (2004) “Volunteer Management Practices and Retention
of Volunteers” The Urban Institute http://www.urban.org
“Keeping Baby Boomers Volunteering, A Research Brief on Volunteer Retention and
Turnover” (2007) The Corporation for National and Community Service
http://www.nationalservice.org
Litch, C. (2007) “Volunteers, Part 1: What Makes Them Stay?” VolunteerHub
http://www2.guidestar.org/rxa/news/articles/2007/volunteers-part-1-what-makes-themstay.aspx
Litch,C. (2007) “Volunteers, Part II:Why do they leave?” VolunteerHub
http://www2.guidestar.org/rxa/news/articles/2007/volunteers-part-2-why-do-theyleave.aspx
Lockhart, D. (2008) “Adjust your thinking: Shifting the focus to volunteer retention”
http://www.charityvillage.com/cv/research/rvol58.html
McCurley, S. (2008) “Designing Work for Today’s Volunteers” Energize, Inc.’s Everyone
Ready® Volunteer Management Skill-Building Program
(http://www.energizeinc.com/everyoneready/)
“Volunteer Growth in America, A Review of Trends Since 1974” (2006) The Corporation
for National and Community Service http://www.nationalservice.org
“Volunteering in America 2011 Research Highlights” (2011) The Corporation for National
and Community Service http://www.nationalservice.org
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line
(and then some!)
Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Kim Haas, Woodland Park Zoo
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Actualize your mission through your volunteer
program
• Traditional model: Volunteers = unpaid labor
• New paradigm: Volunteers = stakeholders in your
institution
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Shift the paradigm
Volunteers meet
interdepartmental
needs but function also
as ambassadors for the
zoo
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
•
Transition from volunteers
that identify themselves with
a particular position or task
to volunteers that identify
themselves as ambassadors
supporting the institution’s
mission in a variety of ways.
• Build a program of
constituents
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Outcomes
• At very least – develop well informed community of
volunteers that will spread your message.
• Many will become supporters and donors of your
institution.
• Some will be inspired to engage in meaningful
conservation action.
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Woodland Park Zoo Volunteer Program
Recruit
Volunteer Overview
Application
Screening
Individual Interview
Criminal Convictions Background Check
Zoo Ambassador Classroom Training
Training
Begin
Service
Mentored Volunteer Training
Begin volunteering-choose specialty
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Additional benefits of comprehensive training
• Volunteers have better connection to the zoo
• Retention increased
• Better flow between positions
• Sense of community within volunteer corps
• Better informed, better connected volunteers
Ambassadors for Conservation
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Continue the journey, build
relationships
• Mentoring – expand
resources
• Creating communityevents, building teams,
continuing education
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
“I’d like to make a tribute about my time at WPZ
…It's really had a profound effect on my life (I've
already signed up to volunteer at the zoo in my
new area and am planning to devote a lot of my
time now to wildlife and conservation activities)…
thank you for sparking a lifelong interest that’s
become an encompassing passion, and for giving
me the chance to volunteer and to change my life.”
-Former WPZ Volunteer
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
From Volunteers to
Conservation Leaders
• Snow Leopard Trust- From
Docent to SLT Board
President
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
From Volunteers to Conservation Stewards
Maasai Association
Give and Get Back: Cultivate Bottom Line (and then some!) Benefits of Your Volunteer Program
Your input…
(Questions, comments)

Can we afford to invest in our volunteer
program?
Our question for you is…
Can you afford NOT to?!
Tammy J. Rach
Senior Volunteer Manager
San Diego Zoo Global
[email protected]
Catherine Johansson
Training and Volunteer Operations
Georgia Aquarium
[email protected]
Bill Davis
Volunteer Manager
The Toledo Zoo
[email protected]
Brooke Estes
Volunteer Manager
Birmingham Zoo
[email protected]
Kim Haas
Volunteer Program Supervisor
Woodland Park Zoo
[email protected]

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