Cyber Security Presentation

Report
Under the Black Hat
August 27, 2014
Daniel Nelson, C|EH, CIPP/US
© 2013 Armstrong
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Teasdale Teasdale
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How Bad is the Hacking Threat?
 “Hackers” write sophisticated computer code to invade
computer networks
 Hackers do this to target personal information which is
then used for identity theft
 “Hacking” is the digital equivalent of robbing a bank:
hackers break into a system, rob it, and make their get-
away
 Hacking leaves digital fingerprints that can be traced back
to catch the thief
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What’s the Real Story?
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Who’s The Hacker?
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Who’s The Hacker
Berkley Blue & Oaf
Tobark
Adrian Lamo
Kevin Poulsen
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Mercedes
Haefer
John “Captain
Crunch” Draper
Robert Morris
They Hack for Profit
Sometimes, but:
 Revenge
 Information
 “A Cause”
 Street Cred
 Boredom
 “Because It’s There”
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They Are After Our Personal
Information
 Says who?
--Brian Krebs, KrebsonSecurity.com
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Hackers Are Computer “Black Belts”
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Everything A Hacker Needs
Over 100 Hacking Tools Preinstalled
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Tools such as:
 John the Ripper (Password Cracking)
 Angry IP Scanner (Scanning)
 THC Hydra (Password Cracking)
 Cain & Abel (Anything you can imagine on a Windows
System)
 Burp-Suite (Web Apps)
 Social Engineering Toolkit (“SET”)
 Wire Shark (packet sniffer)
One of the biggest challenges is to choose from among
a plethora of tools
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Nessu
s
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How Bad for
You/Good for Me
Vulnerability Name: So I Can
Find It Easily
Trespassing At Will?....Priceless
Kali
Linux……………………
The Included
Tools…………
Nessus…………………
…….
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FREE
FREE
FREE
But the Two Most Powerful Hacking
Tools?
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Google
 Pre-hack Reconnaissance on Target:
• System configurations
• Usernames
• Passwords
• Email Addresses
• Reporting Relationships
 The Answer to Any “How Do I” Question You
Could Ever Ask
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YouTube
FUD: Fully Undetectable
Remote
Administration
Terminal (a Trojan)
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True Hackers…
 Love to Share
• Know-how
• Exploits
• Data
• Updates
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Hacking Is Easily Detected
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Hacking Leaves Digital Tracks
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Quick Overview of Hacking
 Basic (but still dangerous) hacking
requires access to YouTube and a
willingness to learn
 Hackers have many different targets
 Good Hackers may lurk in a system for
months
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What Can Be Done
 Combat Social Engineering
• Understand the Threat
• Train
 Engage With Security
• Understand what “IT” really means
• Take Charge
 Understand Current Legal Requirements
 Avoid The Compliance Trap
 Be Your Own CISO
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Social Engineering
 “Hacking the Wetware”
 The most direct, efficient and effective form of attack
 One simple goal: generate an emotional response
 Takes Many Forms:
• Phishing/Spearphising
• Physical Intrusion
• Remote
 Odds are strongly in Hacker’s favor
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Phishing/Spearphishing
 Phishing: Impersonal “blast” email
 Spearphishing: Uses personal information about
“sender” or recipient to encourage recipient to trust
the email
• Vacation plans
• Recent promotions
• Company events
• Hobbies
 This information is all too easy to find:
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Spearphishing Takes Many Forms
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There’s An App For That
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Phishing With SET
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Physical Intrusion
First Rule of Hacking: If you can touch it, you will
own it.
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Social Engineering
Countermeasures
 Build Awareness
• Every Employee is Part of Your
Security Plan
 Train
• Recognize the Common Attack
Vectors
• Appreciate the Dangers
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Engage With Security
 Understanding “IT”
• The field is highly specialized
− Network
− Desktop
− Database
− Programming
− Website
 Security is 10% IT, and 90% Everybody Else
• Physical Security
• Mobile Device Security
• Anti-Phishing
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The Biggest Mistake
 Ignoring Counsel’s Essential Role in Data
Security
 What You Give Up:
• Privilege
• Participation in decisions when it matters most
• Independent analysis
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Protecting Privilege
 Attorney-client privilege can be invoked
between the victim company’s outside legal
counsel and hired third-party forensic firms
that perform a review of the system during a
breach. Invoked privilege allows the forensic
company to report breach results directly to
the law firm.
http://www.secretservice.gov/ECTF_best_practic
es.pdf
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Being There When It Matters Most
 Data Security incidents often have legal
consequences
• Regulators
• Insurance coverage issues
• Lawsuits
 IT won’t be representing the company!
 You can be there when decisions are made, or
you can be there when the die has been cast.
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Independent Eyes
 Why do we have outside auditors?
 Same principal holds true for data forensics:
often outside eyes see more clearly
• Independent evaluation of what went right,
and what went wrong
• May well be more qualified for forensic work
• Better expert witnesses
• Detect the “inside job”
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The Second Biggest Mistake
 Failure to have a plan
 Data Incidents take many forms, and
involve complicated questions that
demand real-time answers
 Regulators (and underwriters)
increasingly looking to whether you had
a plan
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What’s the Next Step?
 Front Desk Security calls: There are two FBI Agents
in the Lobby asking to speak to the head of
Information Security.
• Do you meet with them?
• Do you allow them access to your network?
• What is your company’s policy with respect to
cooperation with law enforcement?
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What’s the Next Step (Part II)
 Your CEO receives an email containing the private
financial information of ten of your customers. The
sender informs you that they have all 10,000 such
records, and intend to release them unless your
company pays a ransom within 12 hours.
• What is your company’s policy for this?
• Do you involve law enforcement?
• What is your media strategy?
• Does your cyber policy cover this?
• How do you evaluate whether the threat is real?
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Understand the Legal Requirements
 Fast Changing Landscape
 The “Law” Simply Can’t Keep Up
 FTC “Common Law” on Security
 HIPAA
 State Data Security Laws
 Long on Recommendations, but
Short on Specifics
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Recent FTC Enforcement Actions
 Cbr Systems, Inc.
• Cbr’s privacy policy promised to handle personal
information securely and in accordance with its
Privacy Policy and Terms of Service
• After unencrypted data contained on storage media
and a laptop were stolen from a Cbr employee’s car,
the FTC charged Cbr with deceptive trade practices
because Cbr failed to meet its promised security
promises. In particular, the FTC focused on Cbr’s
failure to employ secure data transport practices,
failure to encrypt data, and retention of data for which
Cbr no longer had a business need
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Enforcement Actions
 TRENDnet
• SecurView cameras for home monitoring
• Software issue allowed anyone with camera's web
address to view the live feed
 FTC charged:
• Failure to utilize reasonable measures to test security;
• Unencrypted transmission of user credentials, and
unencrypted mobile storage of login information.
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Massachusetts Data Security Laws
 Requires “Comprehensive” data security program
that includes:
• Designated responsible employee(s)
• Identification & assessment of risks
• Employee security policies
• Oversight of service providers (including requiring
such providers, by contract, to maintain appropriate
security measures)
• Encryption of data that will “travel across public
networks” or that will be “transmitted wirelessly”
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Encryption
 Growing body of regulations and enforcement
actions requiring some form of encryption
 Encryption may come in many forms:
• Encryption in transmission (e.g. PCI Rules, TSL/SSL,
PGP Email)
• File level Encryption
• Full disk Encryption
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The Compliance Trap
 Compliance can be Security’s
Worst Enemy
 “Check the Box” is not the same as
“Secure”
 Compliance: Do you have a home
alarm?
 Security: Do you actually turn it
on?
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Be Your Own CISO
 Update & Patch
• Very little “Zero Day” Malware
• Significant Amount of Malware is Reverse Engineered
from the Patch
 Password Security
• Wrc$5oo93=T
• Longer is Better
• PollyWants1Cracker
 Secure Physical Access
 Change Default Passwords
• Computers/Wireless Access Points
• Home Alarms
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Questions?
Dan Nelson, C|EH, CIPP/US, Partner
314.552.6650 [email protected]
http://twitter.com/DanNelsonEsq
www.linkedin.com/in/danielcnelson
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