atlanta public schools

Report
QUALITATIVE DATA-DRIVEN OPPORTUNITIES
TO FOCUS THE 2014 – 2015 ACADEMIC YEAR
R4
THE VISION OF ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS IS TO BE A STUDENT-CENTERED, HIGH-PERFORMING URBAN SCHOOL
DISTRICT, WHERE ALL STUDENTS BECOME SUCCESSFUL, LIFE-LONG LEARNERS AND LEADERS.
PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR THE INSTRUCTIONAL COACHES PLN OF
ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS
by Dan Mulligan, flexiblecreativity.com
April 2014
page 3
Create cooperative pairs at your table.
If there are an odd number of people, form one
team of three.
ESSENTIAL QUESTION
THINK:
 On your THINK PAD, think…then…record your
response to this question:
Based on your experience as a coach..
What are the primary areas to improve student
achievement in your school next year?
PAIR/SHARE:
 Using your notes on the THINK PAD:
Share your insight with your team to the
question:
What are the primary areas to improve student
achievement in your school next year?
OPPORTUNITIES BASED ON QUALITATIVE DATA
• Revisit the efficacy of staff to unpack the standard in execution of the
standard rather than just planning for the standard;
• Reinforce staff capacity to tie Depth of Knowledge to student
engagement;
• Establish and expect a school-wide approach to reading
(annotating/referencing the text to support conclusions);
• Determine the current state of note-taking strategies compared to
the expectations of college and career readiness and act accordingly;
• Strengthen staff craft to provide each student with effective
feedback (is it compliance or authentic);
• Bolster staff mastery of cooperative learning versus group work; and
• Recommit staff to consistently using research-based learning
strategies.
Form a team of four to six coaches…
Bolster staff mastery of cooperative
pages 27 – 28
learning versus group work
Throwback
THURSDAY
The Challenge
Essential Question:
Can the team work collaboratively to develop and execute a strategy to
stack the cups into a pyramid without anyone touching the cups using only
the string and rubber band?
1. Scatter the cups on the table or floor.
2. Remember your goal is to build a tower with the 10 cups. Four cups
should be used to form the base, with the remaining cups stacked to
form a pyramid shape. In the end, the top of the tower should have
one cup.
3. Here are the rules:
a. each member of the team needs to control at least one string
b. everyone must be involved in moving each and every cup
c. you can only use the rubber band & string to get the job done
d. you may not tie the string to the rubber band
e. if anything or anyone touches the cups with hands or body
the team must start from the beginning
4. Everyone must understand the rules
5. You will have 15 minutes to complete the task. Good luck….
page
26
With a partner:
 Determine the
status of your staff
in each element of
the comparison
chart.
 What are some
resources that can
be used to assist
your staff?
Revisit the efficacy of staff to unpack the
standard in execution of the standard rather
than just planning for the standard
pages
4-5
It’s All About:
THE SECOND QUESTION
IDid
justyou
lovebring
these
your
Dan
Mulligan
handout with
workshops!
you?
Find a new friend in the room. Introduce yourself
and share one great thing about your school.
Find 2 comfortable seats and relax.
Reinforce staff capacity to tie Depth of
Knowledge to student engagement
There are two different tools to describe cognitive rigor.
Each addresses something different.
RBT (Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy) – What type
of thinking (verbs) is needed to complete a task?
DOK (Webb’s Depth of Knowledge) – How deeply
do you have to understand the content to
successfully interact with it? How complex or
abstract is the content?
Bloom’s Taxonomy (1956) & Bloom’s Cognitive Process
Dimensions (2005)
Knowledge– Define, duplicate, label, list, name,
order, recognize, relate, recall
Remember– Retrieve knowledge from long-term
memory, recognize, recall, locate, identify
Comprehension—Classify, describe, discuss,
explain, express, identify, indicate, locate,
recognize, report, review, select, translate
Understand – Construct meaning, clarify,
paraphrase, represent, translate, illustrate, give
examples, classify, categorize, summarize,
generalize, predict
Application– Analyze, choose, demonstrate,
dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, practice,
write
Analysis– Analyze, appraise, explain, calculate,
categorize, compare, criticize, discriminate,
examine
Apply – Carry out or use a procedure in a given
situation; carry out or use/apply to an unfamiliar
task
Analyze – Break into constituent parts, determine
how parts relate
Synthesis– Rearrange, assemble, collect,
compose, create, design, develop, formulate,
manage, write
Evaluate – Make judgments based on criteria,
check, detect inconsistencies/fallacies, critique
Evaluation– Appraise, argue, assess, choose,
compare, defend, estimate, explain, judge,
predict, rate, core, select, support, value
Create – Put elements together to form a
coherent whole, reorganize elements into new
patterns/structures.
page
6
HOW THE EXPERTS DEFINE COGNITIVE RIGOR…
Rigor is …
• Quality of thinking, not quantity, and can occur in any grade at
any subject (Bogess, 2007)
• Deep immersion in a subject and should include real-world
settings (Washor & Majkowki, 2006)
• Thoughtful analysis with sufficient attention to accuracy and
detail (Beane, 2001)
• Helping students develop the capacity to understand content
that is complex, ambiguous, provocative, and personally or
emotionally challenging (Strong, Silver, & Perrini, 2001)
What is DOK?
Let’s watch a video
WEBB’S DEPTH-OF-KNOWLEDGE LEVELS
 DOK-1 – Recall & Reproduction – Recall of a fact, term, principle,
concept; perform a routine procedure; locate details
 DOK-2 – Basic Application of Skills/Concepts – Use of
information; conceptual knowledge; select appropriate procedures for a
given task; two or more steps with decision points along the way; routine
problems; organize/ display data; interpret/use simple graphs; summarize;
identify main idea; explain relationships; make predictions
 DOK-3 – Strategic Thinking – Requires reasoning, or developing a
plan or sequence of steps to approach problem; requires decision making or
justification; abstract, complex or non-routine; often more than one possible
answer; support solutions or judgments with text evidence
 DOK-4 – Extended Thinking – An investigation or application to real
world; requires time to research, problem solve, and process multiple
conditions of the problem or task; non-routine manipulations; synthesize
information across disciplines/content areas/multiple sources.
DOK is about depth & complexity –
page
23
Not difficulty!
 The intended student learning outcome determines the DOK
level. What mental process must occur?
 While verbs may appear to point to a DOK level, it is what
comes after the verb that is the best indicator of the rigor/DOK
level.
 Describe the process of photosynthesis
 Describe how the two political parties are alike and
different
 Describe the most significant effect of WWII on the
nations of Europe
Hess’s Cognitive Rigor Matrix:
pages 38 - 40
Applies Webb’s DOK to RBT Cognitive Process Dimensions
STORY: LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD
Where do these questions fit into the matrix?
pages
38 - 40
Spin the Word
modified
• Remove the cards from the bag.
• Place the deck of cards face
down in the center of the table.
• Determine the order of playing
by each person rolling the die.
• Each card contains:
• Math vocabulary word, and
• Method of giving clues
• Remember:
• Each person has a turn,
• Each person has a lifeline!
• Enjoy!
Directions:
1. Form communities of three
table teams.
2. Send a representative from
each table in a community to
obtain a different zip lock bag
(this person will be the
guardian of the zip lock).
3. Number off in your table team.
4. Work with your current team
until requested to switch table
teams within your community.
5. Have fun while sharing…
Click on the arrow to
start and stop spinner.
Self Reliance
There are three types of
baseball players—those who
teachers/administrators
make it happen, those who
watch it happen, and
those who wonder
what happened.
Tommy Lasorda
Create and Use Rubrics
A rubric is a coherent set of criteria for students’
work that includes descriptions of levels of
performance quality on the criteria.
They are descriptive rather than evaluative. Of
course, rubrics can be used to evaluate, but the
operating principle is to match the performance
to the description rather than to “judge” it.
Multiply My Thinking
•
•
•
•
•
Listen for the topic and the amount of time;
Silently mix around the room;
When directed, pair up with person closest to you;
In pairs, Partner A shares and Partner B listens;
Partner B responds to what he/she heard by
paraphrasing: “LET ME TELL YOU WHAT I
UNDERSTOOD YOU TO SAY”;
• Record summary of partners response; then
• Switch Roles
1
What is one initiative (action)
conducted this year with staff
that you are most proud as an
instructional coach? Why was
it effective?
3 What is one way this training
(over the past two years) has
assisted you in refining your
craft as an instructional
coach? Why is this
significant?
2
What is one of your goals
for your staff next year?
Why is it important?
What is one initiative
(action) conducted this year
with staff that you are most
proud as an instructional
coach? Why was it
effective?
What is one way this training
(over the past two years) has
assisted you in refining your
craft as an instructional
coach? Why is this
significant?
What is one of your goals
for your staff next year?
Why is it important?
Establish and expect a school-wide approach to reading
(annotating/referencing the text to support conclusions);
Determine the current state of note-taking strategies compared to
the expectations of college and career readiness and act
accordingly
Establish and expect a school-wide approach to reading
(annotating/referencing the text to support conclusions);
Determine the current state of note-taking strategies compared to
the expectations of college and career readiness and act
accordingly
Establish and expect a school-wide approach to reading
(annotating/referencing the text to support conclusions);
Determine the current state of note-taking strategies compared to
the expectations of college and career readiness and act
accordingly
Recommit staff to consistently using
research-based learning strategies
pages
30 - 31
Organizing Theme:
Famous
Americans
of the 20th
Century
Things someone
would say…
Mohammad Ali
200 POINTS
Aretha Franklin Bill Clinton
100 POINTS
100 POINTS
Elvis
Mickey Mouse
Madonna
50 POINTS
50 POINTS
50 POINTS
Organizing Theme:
Teaching/Learning
Strategies
Relationships
200 POINTS
Formative
Relevance
Assessment
100 POINTS
100 POINTS
Critical Thinking Collaboration
Rigor
50 POINTS
50 POINTS
50 POINTS
Strengthen staff craft to provide each student with
effective feedback (is it compliance or authentic)
page
25
KEY QUESTION: Why are common
assessments so important?
WHY do we ASSESS:
1. INFORM INSTRUCTIONAL
DECISIONS
2.
ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO TRY
“You can enhance or destroy students’ desire to succeed in school
more quickly and permanently through your use of assessment
than with any other tools you have at your disposal.”
Rick Stiggins, Assessment Trainers Institute
• Form a team of two (2) people…
• Determine the person with the most sisters and
send them to pick-up a grid sheet for each
person.
• Distribute a grid sheet to each team member.
• One team-member will face the screen and give
directions. The other team member will have
their back to the screen and follow the verbal
clues provided by their partner (clarifying
questions are encouraged).
• NOTE: Team members should NOT be able to
see what each other is drawing.
Follow-up Debriefing
• Each pair should share with your other team members the
method you used to graph the figure.
• Discuss with your team:
– Which method appeals to you?
– Is there another method that you would prefer?
• Prepare for a “pairs choice of method” with a new graph.
Key Question
Did your performance on the second
attempt to complete the grid exercise
improve after having an opportunity
to self-assess your initial strategy?
IDid
justyou
lovebring
these
your
Dan
Mulligan
handout with
workshops!
you?
Find a new friend in the room. Introduce
yourself and share what you ‘do’.
Find 2 comfortable seats and relax.
Advanced Organizers
Use Visuals
Advanced organizers help students
organize the information and retain 5
times more of the information.
VENN DIAGRAMS
Your school
in
2013 - 2014
Your school
in
2014 - 2015
Category
Ave. Effect
Size (ES)
Percentile
Gain
Identify similarities & differences
1.61
45
Summarizing & note taking
1.00
34
Reinforcing effort & providing recognition
.80
29
Homework & practice
.77
28
Nonlinguistic representations
.75
27
Cooperative learning
.73
27
*Setting objectives & providing feedback*
.61
23
Generating & testing hypotheses
.61
23
Questions, cues, & advance organizers
.59
22
Hey…
This looks
familiar… Which
of the high yield
instructional
strategies do
you see in this
structure?
PAGE 7
Name a noun.
Form a sentence.
Name a verb.
Name an adjective.
Kinds of Evidence – Continuum of Evidence
Informal Check for Understanding
Learning By Doing
When you realize that people learn naturally from the life they
experience every day, it won’t surprise you that the brain is set
up to learn better with active, hands-on endeavors. Many
students request less bookwork and more hands-on activities.
Students are more willing to do bookwork if there is a project or
activity as part of the lesson. Building models and displays,
fieldtrips and fieldwork, hands-on experiments, and craft activities
are all strategies that help students learn.
MOVING from ETCH-a SKETCH Learning
Don’t let the
‘what’
overshadow
the ‘how’!
to Each STUDENT UNDERSTANDING
Introduce your partner to the other team
members at the table.
Fan and Pick
flexiblecreativity.com
Grade 4
Math
Things
that are
parallel
200 POINTS
area
100 POINTS
perimeter
100 POINTS
Types of graphs
Ways to make .25
50 POINTS
50 POINTS
Types of angles
50 POINTS
Page
31

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