niimp - NABC

Report
Nigeria’s Dev Plans,
Summary
NIIMP, NIRP, ATA
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIIMP Infrastructure Spend Projections
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NIIMP Infrastructure Spend Projections
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIIMP
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NIRP
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NIRP
History shows that no country has ever become rich by exporting
raw materials without also having an industrial sector, and in
modern terms an advanced services sector. The more a country
specializes in the production of raw materials only, the poorer it
becomes.
• Industry multiplies National wealth !
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NIRP Underlying Philosophy
• The NIRP’s underlying philosophy is to:
• build Nigeria’s competitive advantage,
• broaden the scope of industry, and
• accelerate expansion of the manufacturing sector.
• The NIRP adopts both a direct and an indirect approach to
promoting industrialization.
• The direct approach identifies sectors where Nigeria can truly
win and dominate, based on an assessment of our country’s
comparative advantage.
• The plan proposes specific initiatives and interventions to
improve productivity in those target sectors and increase
production output.
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NIRP Underlying Philosophy, cont’d.
• The NIRP also adopts an indirect approach in tandem, thereby
acknowledging that it is sometimes difficult to predict where free
market forces will lead industry and which sectors will be
transformational winners.
• As such, the NIRP establishes cross cutting interventions that
address competitiveness of the entire manufacturing sector in
Nigeria (i.e. regardless of sector).
• These indirect interventions create a broad “Nigerian platform”
for manufacturing to thrive, while private capital determines
which sectors will grow.
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NIRP Vision
• Our vision for Industry in Nigeria, is to make it the dominant job
creator and income generator over the next 5 years.
• The NIRP will ensure that Nigeria becomes:
i) The preferred manufacturing hub in West Africa.
ii) One of the top 2 manufacturing hubs in West Africa.
ii) The preferred source for supplying low and mediumtechnology consumer and industrial goods domestically and
regionally.
• Globally, Nigeria seeks to become a top 10 player in at least 10
key manufacturing categories within the next 5 to 10 years.
• The national policy aims to promote capacity expansions within
existing Nigerian manufacturers, hasten their growth, and also
bring in new investors into Nigeria.
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Global Trends in Manufacturing
• The Manufacturing sector
currently contributes 17% of
the world’s US$ 70 tr economy,
& accounts for over 70% of
global trade.
• Poor countries start off by
employing the bulk of their
population in agric, however for
these countries to transition
into middle income/developed
markets, they must create a
robust industrial & services
sectors, which are the drivers
of mass employment,
improved skills, & better wages,
providing the foundations for
long run sustainable economic
growth & advancement
• Also, increasingly the
manufacturing sector drives the
creation of service sector jobs.
In advanced markets, 30% to
55% of service jobs are related
to the manufacturing sector.
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Global Trends in Manufacturing
When evaluating the global
manufacturing industry, the key
question for Nigeria is where to
focus its efforts in building a strong
market position.
The NIRP adopts the following
guiding principles in promoting
Nigeria's industrialization:
(i) A focus on labour intensive low
and medium technology
manufacturing
(ii) Building up core base industries
that are essential for other more
advanced industries to thrive later
(iii) Using the large Nigerian market
demand to deepen industrial
capacity of local firms, as a first
step, before going regional and
global
(iv) Strategically using key
manufacturing sectors as
technology drivers of the economy
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Global & Nigeria Economic Growth Trends
When evaluating the global
manufacturing industry, the key
question for Nigeria is where to
focus its efforts in building a
strong market position.
The NIRP adopts the following
guiding principles in promoting
Nigeria's industrialization:
(i) A focus on labour intensive low
and medium technology
manufacturing
(ii) Building up core base
industries that are essential for
other more advanced industries
to thrive later
(iii) Using the large Nigerian
market demand to deepen
industrial capacity of local firms,
as a first step, before going
regional and global
(iv) Strategically using key
manufacturing sectors as
technology drivers of the
economy
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Nigerian Manufacturing Today
When evaluating the global
manufacturing industry, the key
question for Nigeria is where to
focus its efforts in building a strong
market position.
The NIRP adopts the following
guiding principles in promoting
Nigeria's industrialization:
(i) A focus on labour intensive low
and medium technology
manufacturing
(ii) Building up core base industries
that are essential for other more
advanced industries to thrive later
(iii) Using the large Nigerian market
demand to deepen industrial
capacity of local firms, as a first
step, before going regional and
global
(iv) Strategically using key
manufacturing sectors as
technology drivers of the economy
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Nigerian Manufacturing Today
• Nigeria’s limited industrial sector is
strikingly evident when considering
trade flows.
• Today, the industrial sector
contributes just 3% to export
revenues but accounts for over
50% of imports.
• The country’s trade balance on
manufactured items is therefore
causing a severe drag on Nigeria’s
balance of payments.
• Oil overwhelmingly dominates our
trade at over 90% of total exports
but drives a very small portion of
other industrial activities, incl.
refineries.
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Nigerian Manufacturing Today
Sub-sectors & Product Categories
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NIRP SWOT Analysis
• Abundant raw materials , ~ 44 solid
minerals in commercial quantity
S
7th
• Large market, ~ 170m, most populated
in the world/#4 by 2050, USD100bn
consumer spend pa
• Strategic location (Gulf of Guinea)
• Infrastructure deficit/high cost of doing business
• High interest rates/ cost of capital; paucity of LT
capital
• Policy inconsistency
• Few/No institutions to drive industrialization
• Low industrial skills and innovation
• Abundant labour, ~ 69m, largest in Africa
• Weak metrology and standards
• International /regional political clout
• Weak competition, and fair trading
• Potential to be #1 in Africa (& top10 globally
in many industrial sectors
• Weak/inconsistent tariff regime
• Build up labour-intensive sectors, with
unemployment @ 21%
• Low patronage of ‘Made in Nigeria’ goods
• Produce locally for domestic consumer
market
O
• Become the mfg hub for Ecowas & Africa
• Attract investments from East Asia, where
labour costs have begun to rise
W
• Low consumer purchasing power
• Recent large oil/gas discoveries globally
• Increased competition on industrialization
• Trends in trade policies – globalization &
regionalization
T
• Diversify exports
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NIRP Goals and Objectives
• Designed as a 5-yr plan to accelerate the buildup of industrial capacity
• Expected outcomes incl.:
i. Job creation
ii. Econ & revenue diversification
iii. Import substitution
iv. Export diversification
v. Broadened govt . tax base
• NIRP is unique because, it is:
i. Strategic
ii. Holistic
iii. Integrated/linked to other ministerial plans
iv. Execution focused – clear goals, priorities,
accountabilities, etc.
v. Focused on building institutions
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Best Practices in Industrialization
NIRP draws heavily from China’s and Brazil’s Industrial Development paths
Key elements of China’s path
Key elements of Brazil’s path
1) Special economic zones (ie,
Industrial Cities)
1) Focus on financing
2) Export-oriented private investments
3) Investment promotion
4) Monetary & fiscal instruments
5) Targeting specific parts of global
value-chains
2) Industrial skills and innovation
3) Local patronage
4) A major focus on local demand
5) Strategic protection
6) A mixed approach to market
structure
The examples of China and Brazil show that every country must develop
its own unique recipe for industrialization
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NIRP Sectoral Priorities
Priority sectors possess
regional/ international
comparative adv., based on…
1) Existing skills & installed capacity
2) Natural endowments
3) Competitive cost base
4) Labour intensity
5) Potential for linkages with other
industries
6) Local & regional demand
7) Ability to export to developed markets
Support structures will serve as enablers to unleash
productivity across board, by reducing (or
removing) structural impediments to Nigeria’s
industrialization
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8) Potential for econ. Impact, job
creation, & opening up new non-oil
export markets
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NIRP Information, Measurement & Feedback
NIRP will pursue the following
initiatives…
1) Resource mapping
2) Supplier and skills searches
3) Industrial performance indices
4) NIRP outcomes measurement
NIRP interfaces with other
development plans in Nigeria
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NIRP Linkages with Other Development Plans
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NIRP Expectations on Investments & Economic Impact
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NIRP Expectations on Investments & Economic Impact
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NIRP on Nigerian Oil/Gas Related Industries
•
Nigeria is endowed with some of the largest oil and gas reserves in the world.
–
Current proven oil reserves are estimated at 37.14 b bbls (10th largest in the world),
and gas reserves estimated at 187 tcf (7th largest in the world).
•
Oil production has historically ranged b/w 1.7bpd and 2.4 bpd, while about
2.4tcf of gas is produced annually, of which a third is flared.
•
Nigeria’s Oil and Gas Industry however has been dominated by upstream oil
and gas activities, with little investments in midstream processing and
downstream hydrocarbon related industrial activities.
•
The Nigerian oil and gas Industry accounts for 95% of FX earnings and
between 60% and 70% of total government revenue,
–
yet it only contributes less than 15% of the nation’s GDP.
•
Currently Nigeria exports primarily crude oil and gas, whilst at the same time
importing value-added petroleum based products.
•
Therefore, opportunities for industrialization of Nigeria using the Oil & Gas
sector are enormous by investing heavily in Petrochemicals, Methanol,
Fertilizers, Refineries, and other Gas based processing activities.
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Oil & Gas Industrial Development Action Plan
NIRP draws heavily from China’s and Brazil’s Industrial Development paths
Key Challenges
Action Items (Phase 1)
1) Insufficient oil and gas pipeline
infrastructure
1) Development of Oil/Gas Industrial Cities
2) Oil & gas supply inconsistencies
3) Increasing international competition
for credible global sponsors
4) Low local technology availability
5) High capital intensity
2) Agree guidelines on domestic supply
obligations for gas based manufacturing
3) Investment promotion and sponsors
4) Establishment of the Nigeria Oil/Gas
Industrial Development Committee
5) Regional market penetration for Nigerian
oil/gas products in W & C-Africa
6) Capital mobilization
The examples of China and Brazil show that every country must develop
its own unique recipe for industrialization
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