Using AIMSweb for instructional leadership and decision making: K-5

Report
RTI2 ASSESSMENT PRACTICES:
AIMSWEB LITERACY MEASURES
September 11, 2012
Every student achieving; everyone responsible
What instructional
strategies do we use?
What do we want
students to know or do?
2
RtI
How do we know if they
have learned it?
How do we respond when
they haven't learned it?
What do we do for those
who already know it?
Key Questions in a Response to Instruction and
Intervention (RtI2) Framework
Types of Assessment
Summative Assessments: evaluate
whether the instruction or
WKCE
intervention provided
enough
to help all
Measure is
of powerful
Academic Progress
(MAP)
students achieve or exceed
standards by the
End ofgrade-level
Unit Tests
Final Exams
end of each year.
Formative: Brief, targeted,
and frequent
measures of
Thumbs Up/Thumbs
Down
Quickgoals.
Writes Used as feedback for
progress toward short-term
Exit Slips
refining instruction/learning.
GOMs
Universal Screener/Benchmarking and Progress
General
Outcome
Measures
monitoring: Brief
and
targeted
assessments, focused
on “indicators” Curriculum-Based
of broad skillMeasures
domains.
AIMSweb
Running Records
Diagnostic: inform instructional
planning in order to meet
Phonics Surveys
the most critical needs Reading
of individual
Inventoriesstudents
Assessment Framework Matrix:
Putting it all together
Question is
about…
Type of
Assessment
Purpose of
Assessment
System or System
Unit
Summative/Outco
me
Drive Long-Term
Improvement
Planning
Patterns of
progress toward
system outcome
goals
Universal
Identify groups
Screening/Benchm “on-track” and
arking
“off-track”
Reference
Individual shortterm progress
Actions
Analogy
Benchmarks
Comparables
High Performers
-How are we doing Continue, refine
overall? How did
or change the
we do?
plan
-What direction are
we headed?
-Where should we
focus efforts to
improve?
Standings
Relevant
benchmarks
Who is responding
to instruction?
Who is not
responding to
instruction?
Continue, refine
or change
instruction
Scoreboard
Aimline
Is this student
mastering the
essential skills?
Is the instructional
program working
for this student?
Continue, extend, Play by play
refine or change
outcomes
materials, pace,
instructional
approach, etc…
Progress
Monitoring (CBM)
Individual status or Formative
growth toward
specific learning
objectives.
Answers
Big Ideas in Reading:
And all of the parts need to be in working order…
Alphabetic
Principle
Phonemic
Awareness
Comprehension
Fluency
Vocabulary
How Do Children Learn to Read?
Big Idea 1: Phonemic Awareness
Phonemic Awareness is:

the ability to hear and manipulate the sounds in spoken
words and the understanding that spoken words and
syllables are made up of sequences of speech sounds (Yopp,
1992; see References).

essential to learning to read in an alphabetic writing system,
because letters represent sounds or phonemes. Without
phonemic awareness, phonics makes little sense.

fundamental to mapping speech to print.
•
If a child cannot hear that "man" and "moon" begin with the same sound.
he or she may have great difficulty connecting sounds with their written
symbols or blending sounds to make a word.
How Do Children Learn to Read?
Big Idea 1: Phonemic Awareness
Phonemic Awareness is:
 essential to learning to read in an alphabetic writing
system
 a strong predictor of children who experience early
reading success.
The best predictor of reading difficulty in
kindergarten or first grade is the inability to
segment words and syllables into constituent
sound units (phonemic awareness)" (Lyon, 1995)
Phoneme Awareness is
NOT Phonics – It Permits Phonics

Phoneme awareness provides the foundation for
learning phonics and for differentiating similar
words in speech
/b/
/r/
br
/I/
igh
/t/
t
How do Children Learn to Read?
Big Idea 2: The Alphabetic Principal
The Alphabetic Principal is:
 Alphabetic Understanding: Words are composed of letters
that represent sounds
 Phonological Recoding: Using systematic relationships
between letters and phonemes to retrieve the pronunciation
of an unknown printed string or to spell words
 Phonics
Because our language is alphabetic, decoding is an essential
and primary means of recognizing words. There are simply
too many words in the English language to rely on memorization
as a primary word identification strategy.
Correlations Between Decoding and
Comprehension
0.9
0.89
0.83
0.8
0.77
0.71
0.7
0.69
0.69
0.7
0.63
0.63
Gr8
Gr9
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0
Gr1
Gr2
Gr3
Gr4
Gr5
Gr6
Gr7
How Do Children Learn to Read?
Big Idea 3: Fluency





Fluency is the ability to “break the code” effortlessly.
A fluent reader is one whose decoding processes are
automatic, requiring no conscious attention. Such
capacity then enables readers to allocate their
attention to the meaning of text.
Fluency is a very strong predictor of comprehension.
Fluency is developed through repeated oral reading
practice with text that is readily decodable.
Fluency is also improved through oral reading with
systematic guidance and feedback
How Do Children Learn to Read?
Big Idea 4: Comprehension


Comprehension is a complex cognitive process that cannot be
understood without a clear description of the role of
vocabulary instruction
Good Comprehenders…






Relate new information to existing knowledge
Have well developed vocabularies
Can summarize, predict and clarify
Use questioning strategies to guide comprehension
Text comprehension can be improved by explicit instruction that
helps readers use specific strategies
Instruction in using strategies flexibly and in combination is
important.
How Do Children Learn to Read?
Big Idea 5: Vocabulary



Children use their knowledge of word meanings to
make sense of the words they see in print
Beginning readers have a much more difficult time
reading words that are not already part of their
oral vocabulary.
Children learn word meanings indirectly in three
ways:
 They
engage in daily oral language
 They listen to adults read to them
 They read on their own
How Do Children Learn to Read?
Big Idea 5: Vocabulary
Vocabulary research shows…
 Children who are not yet proficient readers learn
little vocabulary through the reading process.
 Children from low SES environments are exposed to
dramatically fewer words on a daily basis.
 Words per hour:
 Lowest SES 616
 Low 1251
 Average 2153
 Independent reading by proficient readers has a
substantial effect on vocabulary development.
Basic Early Literacy Skill
Predictive of reading acquisition and later
reading achievement
 Something we can do something about, i.e.
something we can teach
 Something that improves student outcomes
for children when we teach it

Steps for Successful Readers
(Schools in Kalamazoo County 2004-2006)
Probability of “Staying on
Track”
.85 (n=770)
.82 (n=849)
.83 (n=910)
Fluency
(Spr, 1st)
.62 (n=1178) Alphabetic .14 (n=336)
Principle
(Win, 1st)
Phonemic .16 (n=114)
Awareness
(Spr, Kdg)
Fluency
(Spr 2nd)
.97 (n=372)
Fluency
(Spr, 5th)
.92 (n=561)
Fluency
(Spr, 4th)
.09 (n=185)
Fluency
(Spr, 3rd)
0 (n=190)
.03 (n=401)
.05 (n=238)
Probability of
“Catching-Up”
n = number of students
What do we know from Research
Reading trajectories are established early
 Readers on a low trajectory tend to stay on a
low trajectory and tend to fall further behind

Unless…
We change the trajectory
GOM, CBM, AIMSweb, Universal Screening…
Undertanding CBM & GOM

Article
1
Ah-ha and 1 Question
Things to Always Remember About CBM
Designed to serve as “indicators” of general reading
achievement: CBM probes don’t measure everything,
but measure the important things.
Standardized tests to be given, scored, and interpreted
in a standard way
Researched with respect to psychometric properties to
ensure accurate measures of learning
Things to Always Remember About CBM (cont.)
Are sensitive to improvement in brief intervals of time
Also tell us how students earned their scores (qualitative
information)
Designed to be as short as possible to ensure its “do
ability”
Are linked to decision making for promoting positive
achievement and Problem-Solving
What is AIMSweb?

Curriculum-based measures (CBMs)
 What
it is: short reliable and valid probes of academic
skills; a “snapshot”
 Research: useful tools to identify student needs and track
progress
 Identifies students who are “at-risk” for poor academic
outcomes
 Indicators of larger skill set

On-line data management and tools
 Benchmarking
 Three
times a year, for all students (Tier 1, Universal support)
 Progress
 As
22
monitoring
needed basis, for students that have academic concerns (Tier
2, Targeted support and Tier 3, Intensive support)
AIMSweb Probes in Literacy
BIG IDEA
Probe
What Students Do
Letter Naming Fluency
(LNF)
Say the name of visually presented
letters in 1 minute
Phonemic
Awareness
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
(PSF)
Say the phonemes in orally
presented words n 1 minute
Beginning Phonics
Letter Sound Fluency (LFS)
Say the sound of visually
presented letters in 1 minute
Beginning Phonics
Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)
Read non-real, three letter words
in 1 minute
Advanced Phonics and Fluency in
Connected Text
Reading- CBM
(R-CBM)
Read narrative and expository
stories in 1 minute
Comprehension
MAZE
Identify the correct word from 3
choices in a passage
Using AIMSweb for Problem-Solving and
Instructional Decision-Making
How Does it Fit Together?
Standard Treatment Protocol
Step 2
Step 1
All Students at
a grade level
Intensive
Supplemental
Step 3
Step 4
Addl.
Diagnostic
Assessment
Instruction
Individual
Diagnostic
Individualized
Intensive
1-5%
5-10%
Standard
Protocol
Behavior
Academics
Small
Group
Differentiated
By Skill
BenchMark
Assessment
Annual
Testing
weekly
2 times/month
Core
ODRs
Monthly
Bx
Screening
Results
Monitoring
80-90%
None
Continue
With
Core
Instruction
Grades
Classroom
Assessments
Yearly Assessments
Problem Identification
140
Peers
120
100
80
Benchmark
60
40
Student
20
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12
Problem Identification
140
120
100
80
Benchmark
60
Peers
40
Student
20
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12
Problem Identification
140
120
100
80
Benchmark
60
Peers
40
Student
20
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12
x
70
College
and
Career
Readiness
Explore/Plan/ACT
60
50
MAP
40
CBM
MAP
EPAS
30
CBM
x
x x x
20
x
x
xx x
x
x
x x
x
10
x
x
x
x
0
4K
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
What it really looks like:

Universal Screening during benchmark period three
times per year (required for grades 1 and 2 only)
 One-to-one
administration
 Approximately 5-7 minutes/student
 Paper booklets for each student

In the future: Progress monitoring for those receiving
supplemental interventions at regular intervals (e.g.,
1x/week)
Classroom Report
Example Student Benchmarking Report
Tier 1 Benchmark
All students assessed three times per year at grade level

Organizes Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) data for
Benchmark Assessment Fall, Winter, and Spring

Prepares Reports for Teachers, Principals, and Administrators
on Individual Students, Classes, Grades, Schools, and School
Districts

Early Identification of Students At-Risk of Academic Difficulty

Objectively Determines Rates of Progress for Individual
Students, Schools, and NCLB Risk Groups

Allows Evaluation at Multiple Levels of Comparison

Prints Professional Reports for Parent Conferences and Other
Meetings
Tier 2 Strategic Monitor
Monthly assessments at grade level

Increase assessment frequency for
students who have been identified as
questionable or at-risk in the Benchmark
process

Monthly assessment intervals provide
more frequent opportunity to evaluate the
effectiveness of instructional changes
Tier 3 Progress Monitor
Frequent assessment towards goals using goal level
assessments

Frequently assess students in need of intensive
instructional services, including “Best Practices”
IEP goals for students who receive special
education services

Translate annual IEP or any goals into expected
rates of progress (Aim lines) automatically

Monitor progress (Trend lines) towards goals

Document the effects of intervention and instruction

Print professional reports for periodic and annual
reviews
Administration and Scoring
Letter Naming Fluency
36
Administration and Scoring of Letter Naming Fluency
37
What examiners need to do…

Before testing students

While testing students

After testing students
Things You Need Before Testing: Letter Naming Fluency
Specific Materials Arranged:
• Student copy of Letter
Naming Fluency (not
numbered)
• Examiner copy of Letter
Naming Fluency
(numbered for easy
scoring)
• Clipboard to provide a
hard surface for
recording student
answers
• Stopwatch
Things You Need While Testing Letter Naming Fluency
Standard Directions for 1- Minute Administration:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Place the unnumbered copy in front of the student.
Place the numbered copy in front of you, but shielded so the student
cannot see what you record.
Say: “Here are some letters [point to the student copy]. Begin here, [point to
the first letter] and tell me the names of as many letters as you can. If
you come to a letter you don’t know, I’ll tell it to you. Are there
any questions? Put your finger under the first letter. Ready,
begin.”
Start you stopwatch. If the student fails to say the first letter name after
3 seconds, tell the student the letter name and mark it as incorrect.
Point to the next letter to indicate for the child to move on.
If the student provides the letter sound rather than the letter name say,
“Remember to tell me the letter name, not the sound it makes.”
This prompt may be provided once during the administration.
Things You Need While Testing Letter Naming Fluency
Standard Directions for 1- Minute Administration (Continued)
6)
7)
8)
9)
If the student does not get any correct letter names within the first 10
letters (1 row), discontinue the task and record a score of 0.
Follow along on your copy. Put a slash ( / ) through letter names given
incorrectly.
The maximum time for each letter is 3 seconds. If a student does not
provide the next letter within 3 seconds, tell the student the letter name
and mark it as incorrect. Point to the next letter and say, “What letter?”
At the end of 1 minute, place a bracket ( ] ) after the last letter and say,
“Stop.”
Things to Do After Testing Letter Naming Fluency
•
Score immediately to ensure accurate results
• Students receive 1 point for every correct letter
named in 1 minute
What is a Correct Letter Name?
•
A correctly named letter
• Confused I’s and L’s as a function of font
• Self Corrections
What is an Incorrect Letter Name?
•
Substitutions of a different letter for the stimulus
letter (e.g., “P” for “D”)
• Omissions of a letter
• Stops or struggles with a letter for more than 3
seconds
Note: Skipped Row. If a student skips an entire
row, draw a line through the row and do not count
the row in scoring
Calculating & Reporting Scores Letter Naming Fluency
•
Count the total number of letters the student read
• Count the number of errors and subtract
• Report the total number of letters named correctly
Example of Calculating Scores
•
Angela finished letter naming after 1 minute at
the 20th letter, so she named 20 letters total
• Angela also made 5 errors
• Therefore, her recorded score is
15 (20 – 5 = 15)
Reported as 15
Let’s Practice!
Administration and Scoring
Letter Sound Fluency
Big Ideas in Reading:
And all of the parts need to be in working order…
Alphabetic
Principle
Phonemic
Awareness
Comprehension
Fluency
Vocabulary
Big Idea: Phonemic Awareness



Phoneme: a speech sound. It is the smallest unit of
language that has no inherent meaning
Phonemic Awareness: The understanding that spoken
words and syllables are made up of sequences of
speech sounds, and the ability to hear and
manipulate these sounds.
Phonics: Use of the code (sound-symbol relationships)
to recognize words
Big Idea: Phonemic Awareness


Gives readers a way to approach sounding out
and reading new words
Helps readers understand the alphabetic principle
(that letters in words are systematically represented
by sounds)
Things You Need Before Testing Letter Sound Fluency
Specific Materials Arranged:
• Student copy of Letter
Sound Fluency (not
numbered)
• Examiner copy of
Letter Sound Fluency
(numbered for easy
scoring)
• Clipboard to provide a
hard surface for
recording student
answers
• Stopwatch
Things You Need While Testing Letter Sound Fluency
Standard Directions for 1- Minute Administration
1) Place the unnumbered copy in front of the student.
2) Place the numbered copy in front of you, but shielded so the student
cannot see what you record.
3) Say, “Begin here, [point to the first letter] and tell me the sounds of
as many letters as you can. If you come to a letter you don’t
know, I’ll tell it to you. Are there any questions? Put your finger
under the first letter. Ready, begin.”
4) Start your stopwatch. If the student fails to say the first letter sound
after 3 seconds, tell the student the letter sound and mark it as
incorrect. Point to the next letter and say, “What sound?”
5) If the student provides the letter name rather than the letter sound say,
“Remember to tell me the sound the letter makes, not its name.”
This prompt may be provided once during the administration.
52
Things You Need While Testing Letter Sound Fluency
Standard Directions for 1- Minute Administration (Continued)
6) If the student does not get any correct letter sounds within the first 10
letters (1 row), discontinue the task and record a score of 0.
7) Follow along on your copy. Put a slash ( / ) through letter sounds
given incorrectly. The maximum time for each letter is 3 seconds.
8) The maximum time for each letter is 3 seconds. If a student does not
provide the next sound within 3 seconds, tell the student the letter
sound and mark it as incorrect. Point to the next letter and say,
“What sound?”.
9) At the end of 1 minute, place a bracket ( ] ) after the last letter and say,
“Stop.”
53
Things to Do After Testing Letter Sound Fluency
1. Count the total number of letter sounds read
2. Count the number of errors and subtract
3. Total the number of letter sounds read correctly
What is a Correct Letter Sound?
Students provide the most COMMON sound of the
letter.
(A pronunciation guide for the most common sounds is
in the Appendix of the AIMSweb Training Workbook)
•
• Confused I’s and L’s as a function of font
• Self Corrections
What is an Incorrect Letter Sound?
•
Substitutions of a different letter sound for the
stimulus letter (e.g., /puh/ for /D/)
• Omissions of a letter sound
• Stops or struggles with a letter sound for more
than 3 seconds
Note: Skipped Row. If a student skips an entire
row, draw a line through the row and do not count
the row in scoring
Let’s Practice!
Administration and Scoring
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
Things You Need Before Testing
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
Specific Materials
Arranged:
• Examiner copy of
Phonemic
Segmentation
Fluency
(numbered for
easy scoring)
• Clipboard to
provide a hard
surface for
recording student
answers
• Stopwatch
Things You Need While Testing:
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
Standard Directions for 1- Minute Administration
1) Place the examiner copy in front of you, but shielded so the student
cannot see what you record.
2) Say: “I am going to say a word. After I say it, I want you to tell me
all the sounds in the word. So, if I say, “Sam,” you would say /s/
/a/ /m/. Let’s try one [1 second pause]. Tell me the sounds in
“mop.”
Correct Response
Very good.
Incorrect Response
The sounds in “mop” are /m/ /o/ /p/. Your
turn. Tell me the sounds in “mop”.
3) Say: “Okay. Here is your first word.”
4) Give the student the first word and start your stopwatch. If the student
does not say a sound segment after 3 seconds, give the second word
and score the first word as 0 segments produced.
Things You Need While Testing:
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
Standard Directions for 1- Minute Administration (Continued)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
As the student says the sounds, mark the student’s response in the
scoring column. Underline ( __ ) each sound segment produced correctly.
Put a slash ( / ) through sounds produced incorrectly.
As soon as the student is finished saying the sounds, present the next
word promptly and clearly.
If the student does not get any sounds correct in words 1-5, discontinue
the task and record a score of 0.
The maximum time for each sound segment is 3 seconds. If the student
does not provide the next sound segment within 3 seconds, give the
student the next word. If the student provides the initial sound only, wait 3
seconds for elaboration.
At the end of 1 minute, stop presenting words and scoring further
responses. Place a bracket ( ] ) after the last segment produced. Add the
number of sound segments produced correctly. Record the total number of
sound segments produced correctly on the bottom of the scoring sheet.
Things to Do After Testing:
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency


Students receive 1 point for every correct segment provided in
1 minute
Calculate total number of segments correct
What is a Correct Segment?







Complete segmentation (Example: “T…r…i…ck”)
Incomplete segmentation (Example: “Tr…ick”)
Overlapping segmentation (Example: “Tri…ick”)
Schwa sounds (Example: “Tuh…ruh…i…kuh”)
Additions (Example: “T…r…i…ck…s”)
Articulation and dialect; imperfect pronounciations
due to dialect or articulation (Example: “r…e…th…t”
for “rest”)
Elongated sounds (Example: “rrrrreeeesssstttt”)
What is an Incorrect Segment?
•
Omissions (Example: “t…ick”)
• No segmentation (Example: “trick”)
• Segment mispronunciation (Example: “t…r…i…ks”)
Let’s Practice!
Administration and Scoring
Nonsense Word Fluency
Big Ideas in Reading:
And all of the parts need to be in working order…
Alphabetic
Principle
Phonemic
Awareness
Comprehension
Fluency
Vocabulary
Big Idea: Alphabetic Principal



Alphabetic Understanding: Words are composed of letters
that represent sounds
Phonological Recoding: Using systematic relationships
between letters and phonemes to retrieve the pronunciation of
an unknown printed string or to spell words
Phonics: The system of letter-sound relationships that is the
foundation for decoding words in print (Kaminski and Good)
Big Idea: Alphabetic Principal




Letter-Sound Knowledge is a prerequisite to word
identification
The combination of instruction in phonemic awareness and
letter-sound relationships appears to be the most effective for
successful early reading.
Good readers have high capacity to apply the alphabetic
principle.
During the alphabetic phase, reading must have lots of
practice phonologically recoding the same words to become
familiar with patterns for reading and spelling
Administration and Scoring of Nonsense Word Fluency
What Examiners Need to Do . . .
Before testing students
• While testing students
• After testing students
•
Things You Need Before Testing:
Nonsense Word Fluency
Specific Materials Arranged:
• Student copy of
Nonsense Word Fluency
(not numbered)
• Examiner copy of
Nonsense Word Fluency
(numbered for easy
scoring)
• Practice Examples
• Clipboard to provide a
hard surface for
recording student
answers
• Stopwatch
Things You Need While Testing:
Nonsense Word Fluency
Standard Directions for Practice Items Administration
1) Place the practice items in front of the child.
Nonsense Word Practice Items
bim
lat
2) Say: “Look at this word (point to the first word on the practice probe).
It’s a make-believe word, not a real word. All the letters have
sounds: (point to the letter “b”) /b/, (point to the letter “i”) /i/, (point to
the letter “m”) /m/. Altogether the sounds are /b/ /i/ /m/ (point to each
letter) or “bim” (run your finger fast through the whole word).
Remember, it is a made up word. You can say the sounds of the
letters, /b/ /i/ /m/ (point to each letter), or you can say the whole word
“bim” (run your finger fast through the whole word). Be sure to say
any sounds you know. Ready? Lets try one. Read this word the
best you can (point to the word “lat”). Point to each letter and tell me
the sound or tell me the whole word.”
Things You Need While Testing:
Nonsense Word Fluency
Standard Directions for Practice Items Administration (Continued)
Correct Response
That’s right. The sounds are /l/ /a/ /t/ or
“lat”
Incorrect Response
Watch me: (point to the letter “l”) /l/, (point to
the letter “a”) /a/, (point to the letter “t”) /t/.
Altogether the sounds are /l/ /a/ /t/ (point
to each letter) or “lat” (run your finger fast
through the whole word). Remember, you
can say the sounds or you can say the
whole word. Let’s try again. Read this
word the best you can (point to the word
“lat”).
Things You Need While Testing:
Nonsense Word Fluency
Standard Directions for 1- Minute Administration
1) Place the unnumbered copy in front of the student.
1) Place the numbered copy in front of you, but shielded so the student
cannot see what you record.
1) Say: “Here are some more make-believe words (point to the student
probe). When I say “begin”, start here (point to the first word), go
across the page (point across the page), and read the words the
best you can. Remember, you can tell me the sound of the letter
or read the whole word. Put your finger under the first word.
Ready, begin.”
1) Start your stopwatch. If the student does not respond with a sound
after 3 seconds, tell the student the sound and say, “next sound?”
Things You Need While Testing:
Nonsense Word Fluency
Standard Directions for 1- Minute Administration (Continued)
5) If the student does not get any sounds correct in words 1-5,
discontinue the task and record a score of 0.
6) Follow along on the examiner copy of the probe and underline each
phoneme the student provides correctly. Put a slash ( / ) over each
phoneme read incorrectly or omitted.
5) At the end of 1 minute, place a bracket ( ] ) after the last letter and
say, “Stop.”
Things to Do After Testing: Nonsense Word Fluency

Students receive 1 point for every correct sound or word
provided in 1 minute.
b a v = 3 points
b a v = 3 points
What is a Correct Letter Sound?
•
•
•
•
•
Correct letter sounds
Correct words
Self Corrections
Sounds Produced Out of Order
Blended Letter Sounds
Let’s Practice!
Understanding Norms Tables


National norms in AIMSweb are based on all student data in
the database nationwide
Norms tables will tell you
 The score that corresponds with each percentile rank
 The ROI (Rate of Improvement) made for students who
scored at that percentile


ROI on the norms table is the Spring score minus the Fall score (Winter
minus Fall) divided by 36 weeks (or 18 weeks)
Size of the sample at each benchmark, mean score, and
standard deviation
Example:
National Norms for 2nd Grade R-CBM
Planning for Implementation
Planning and Implementation

Identify Population to screen






Name, Student id, class, school – send to External Coach
Review Implementation Checklist in Binder for Action Steps
RTI coach will come help you with screening based on your
created schedule. Please allow time for up front practice in
administration/fidelity check
This coach will partner up with the data point person to show
how to enter the data and how database works. Could be the
same day of administration. This person will have rights to the
database. Walk through report options that MMSD will use.
Once report(s) are generated, a problem-solving meeting
MUST occur.
An outcome of this P-S meeting may be to progress monitor a
FEW individuals. Additional training will be provided to those
that need it.

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