March_Master[1]

Report
Day 1
8:30 am
8:45 am
9:00 am
10:00 am
Welcome
Introductions
Table Talk 1- What is Data Wise?
Table Talk 2 and 3- Data
Conversation
11:30 am Lunch
1:00 pm Table Talk 4-Digging Into Data
Day 2
8:30 am
9:00 am
10:30 am
11:30 am
1:00 pm
2:00 pm
Reflection
Table Talk 5- Analyze Current Practice
Table Talk 6- Why? Why? Why?
Lunch
Table Talk 7-Learning to See
Table Talk 8- Going Back to School
What Data Wise Is and Isn’t
It IS . . .
It is NOT . . .
• A process
• A way to structure
improvement
• Grounded in multiple
forms of data
• Collaborative
• A program
• An add-on
• Just about using test
data
• A solo activity
A Culture of Inquiry Using the Data Wise
Improvement Process
Phase 1- Prepare
Lay the ground work for collaboration and data
use.
Organize for Collaborative Work
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Adopt an improvement process
Set aside time for collaborative work
Launch a data team
Attach each faculty member to a team
Create a system of teams
Inventory data and initiatives
Build Assessment Literacy
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Explore assessment instruments
Study assessment reports
Apply assessment terms & principles
Learn about misuses of data
Begin to make connections between test data
and classroom generated assessments
Data Overview
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Choose a focus
Determine the story
Display the data
Plan how to use data in meetings
Generate questions for the Inquiry Phase
Phase 2- Inquiry
“Groups work together to explore data from a
range of sources in an effort to understand
students’ learning and teachers’ practice.”
Boudette and Steele (2007).Data Wise in Action: Stories of Schools Using Data to
Improve Teaching and Learning. Cambridge, MA ( Harvard Education Press, 2007)
Dig into Data
• Use a wide range of data including projects,
quizzes and class work
• Triangulate data sources
• “Indentify a gap in skill or understanding
common to many students that, if corrected
would have far reaching implications for
students’ continued academic growth known
as a learner –centered problem.”
Boudette and Steele (2007).Data Wise in Action: Stories of Schools Using Data to
Improve Teaching and Learning. Cambridge, MA ( Harvard Education Press, 2007)
Examine Instruction
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Collect evidence of what is happening in
classrooms
Identify a “problem of practice: an
instructional challenge that teachers believe
is worth tackling collectively.”
Develop shared understanding of effective
practice
Boudette and Steele (2007).Data Wise in Action: Stories of Schools Using Data to
Improve Teaching and Learning. Cambridge, MA ( Harvard Education Press, 2007)
Develop an Action Plan
• Decide on an instructional strategy
• Agree on what the plan will look like in
classrooms
• Put the plan down on paper
• Make sure the plan addresses the Learner
Centered Problem
• Make sure the plan addresses the Problem of
Practice
Phase 3- Act
“Educators develop and carry out a plan for
addressing the problem of practice and
improving student performance.”
Boudette and Steele (2007).Data Wise in Action: Stories of Schools Using Data to
Improve Teaching and Learning. Cambridge, MA ( Harvard Education Press, 2007)
Plan to Assess
• Set short, medium and long term goals
• Select a range of data to measure progress
Act and Assess
• Implement your action plan
• Monitor how well the action plan is being
carried out
• Execute the plan for assessing progress
• Make midcourse adjustments
Act and Assess
• Integrate plan into work of the school
• Visit classrooms
• Review data and make adjustments
The Data Overview
“We need to get everyone talking
about data.”
Case Study: McKay K-8 School
Problem:
The principal presented a data overview
depicting gains in mathematics and a shocking
decline in language arts. She did not get the
creative brainstorming she hoped for.
“ You could hear a pin drop. I was not prepared
for the silence-I felt like I had dropped a
bomb.”
Case Study: McKay K-8 School
Second Data Overview Presentation
• Used a second Data Overview to tell a story using
more historical data
• Used objectives to frame the conversation
• Used discussion prompts
• Pointed out areas of improvement
• Connected the presentation to AYP goals
• Used Mini Data Overviews during the school year
Case Study: McKay K-8 School
Third Data Overview Presentation
• Planning and presentation was a team effort
• The team considered how data could be
better incorporated in to the school culture
• The bulk of the Data overview meeting was
dedicated to small group work on goal-setting
activities, and to brainstorm areas of student
performance to further investigate
Case Study: McKay K-8 School
Third Data Overview Presentation
• Teachers presented the Data Overview
• Used varied sources of data
• Used different data presentation formatsgraphs and tables
Data Overview
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Choose a focus
Determine the story
Display the data
Plan how to use data in meetings
Generate questions for the Inquiry Phase
Purpose of today’s meeting
To start a conversation and
generate questions for
inquiry into reading
performance at Primary
grades by looking at how
our students performed on
the state test last spring.
What do you see?
What questions do you have
about what you see?
What do you see?
What questions do you have
about what you see?
What questions do you have about the
Reading Classroom?
Student
Work
Curriculum
Teaching
Strategies
Materials
28
How will our teams work
together to explore these
questions?
Data Overview Discussion
• What went well about our Data Overview
Conversation?
• Do you see an emerging story? If so, what is
it? If not, what else do you need to see?
• How will you improve upon this Data
Overview Conversation?
The Data Overview Conversation
• The Data Team prepares the data for the
teams.
• Teams look at their data to generate
questions.
• Teams use the questions to set up the
Professional Learning Communities.
• The Data Overview changes as the year goes
on to include recent data.
Step 1- Decide What to Display
Things we need
to discuss
What data
How will we
sources will help display the data?
us tell the story?
Step 2- Decide Which Discussion
Questions to Use
Sample Questions
• What do you see? What questions do you
have?
• What do you notice? What more would you
like to know about it?
• What’s going on in the data? What do you see
that makes you say that? What more can you
find in the data?
Table Talk 2
Practice: With Your Team
• Create graphics for your data.
• Practice generating questions about the data
using the process modeled.
• Discuss how you will set up the data
conversation (s) at your school.
Who will facilitate the conversations?
When will the conversations take place?
How will the Data Team keep track of the questions?
Practice: With Another Team
• Facilitate a conversation about your data (do
not present it or share your questions-get the
other team to generate questions about it).
• Compare the two sets of questions.
Table Talk 3- Digging Into Data
This is the most commonly misunderstood step
of the Data Wise Process. Let’s talk about the
different between drilling into a single data
source and digging into data.
What is a Learner-Centered Problem?
A learner – centered problem is a gap in skill
or understanding common to many students
that, if corrected, would have far reaching
implications for students’ continued academic
growth.
What tools are helpful when digging
into data?
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Student Self- Assessments
Student Work done in class
Interview Data
Student work from a test
Timed student work
Tests
Quizzes
Projects
Dig Into Data-Look at a Range of Data
Summative
Benchmark
Common
Assessments
Formative Common
Assessments
Formative classroom assessments
Drilling Down into one Data Source
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Aggregated
Disaggregated
Strand
Item Analysis
Student Work
Benchmark Assessments
Quarterly or End of Unit
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Aggregated
Disaggregated
Strand
Item
Student Work
Formative Common Assessments
1 to 4 times per month
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Math Problem of the week
Writing Samples
Science Journals
Projects
Oral Presentations
Group Projects
Daily Formative Assessment
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Student Self- Assessment
Descriptive Feedback
Conference Notes
Written response
Discussion
Focus
Evaluate inferences, conclusions, and
generalizations and provide evidence by
referencing the text (s).
How can we assess our students’ performance
related to evaluating inferences, conclusions,
and generalizations by referencing text
without practicing test questions over and
over again?
Digging Into Reading Data
Oral Book Report
Reader’s
Response
Letter
Quote
Interpretations
in notebook
Learner
Centered
Problem
Case: West Hillsborough Elementary
School
Problem: The strong culture of collaboration was
not translating into gains in student
achievement.
Goal: The goal was to narrow the focus of the
improvement efforts and broaden the
definition of data.
Importance of Multiple Measures
“ Some assessments don’t measure what we
need to measure. For instance, the benchmark
assessments tell us a lot, but for some
students not enough. Certain kids will score 11
out of 12 or 12 out of 12 on the multiple
choice assessment, but still cannot write a
paragraph connecting the story to a real life
event or compare and contrast one story with
another.” pg. 78
Case: West Hillsborough Elementary
School
Action Steps:
West Hillsborough decided to build on
practices that were already in place- analyzing
interim assessment data (pg. 76);
Look at student work by following the
performance of a small number of individuals
known as “focal students”;.
Case: West Hillsborough Elementary
School
Creating personalized education plans for all
students and allow them to dig into their own
data.
Student Interview
• How do you answer questions after reading a
passage?
Student Response: I read the question. I
rewrite part of the question to start my
answer. I think for a minute about what I want
to say and then I write it down.
Student Interview
• Do you use the passage at all when you
answer the question?
Yeah, I write down whatever I remember.
• Do you ever go back to read again or look at
your notes?
No, I don’t go back and I do not take notes.
Note Sheet
What did the
student do well?
How can the
student improve?
Note Sheet
What did the
student do well?
How can the
student improve?
Note Sheet
What did the
student do well?
How can the
student improve?
Step 5- Examining Instruction
• Analyze Current Practice
“Describe what is going on, with a shared understanding of
effective practice as a reference.”
• Why-Why-Why diagram
Captures teachers experience, feelings and beliefs.
• Learning to See
“I noticed, I saw, I heard”
Case Study Richard J. Murphy K-8
School
Problem- “We were at a place where most
teachers were afraid to be watched because
they feared intense scrutiny and judgment.”
Solution- “ A fixed peer observation structure to
clarify expectations and minimize ambiguity.”
The Murphy Peer Observation Process
Step 1- Focus the observation as a team and prepare
the model lesson.
Step 2- Introduce the lesson immediately prior to the
observation.
Step 3- Conduct and observe the lesson.
Step 4- Debrief the lesson.
Step 5- Plan small steps for ALL members of the team.
Step 6- Debrief the team-wide implementation.
Examining Instruction
Sample Preparation Activity 1
Protocol- What does _____ mean?
Alone
• Write your definition of __________.
• List the _____ work you expect to see in classrooms.
With your team
• Note similarities and differences in your definitions.
“As One”
• Write your shared definition of _______.
Examining Reading Instruction- Sample
Preparation Activity 2
Learning to See- Create a draft document to
answer the question, “What should be seen
in a Reading classroom?”
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What should we see?
What should we hear?
What should the students be doing?
What should the teacher be doing?
Step 5- Examining Instruction
• Table Talk 5- Analyze Current Practice
“Describe what is going on, with a shared understanding of
effective practice as a reference.”
• Table Talk 6- Why-Why-Why diagram
Captures teachers experience, feelings and beliefs.
• Table Talk 7- Learning to See
“I noticed, I saw, I heard”
Table Talk 8- Going Back to School
What are you going to do when
you get back to school?
Use the organizer as a guide.
To Do List
Task
Data Team
Connecting
Inventories/Vision
System of Teams
Generating Questions
from the Data
Overview
Plan
To Do List
Task
Learner Centered
Problem
Problem of Practice
Plan
References
Boudett,K. & Steele, J. (2007). Data wise in
action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education
Press.
Love, N., Stiles, K., Mundry, S., & Ranna,K.
(2008).The data coaches guide to improving
learning for all students. Thousand Oaks, CA:
Corwin Press.

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