Burkina Faso: Education

Report
Burkina Faso:
Education
By: Crystal Tseng and Choyeon Yoo
Overview/Statistics
• 14.75 million population (2010)
• Completion of the sixth primary grade is the minimum
required to make literacy irreversible
• Only 3 out of 10 children complete the 6th grade
• Only 25% of girls finish the last year of primary school
• 41% gross primary school enrollment, 12% secondary school
enrollment, and 1% university enrollment
• Overall 22% adult literacy rate
• Placed last in UNESCO’s EFA Development Index
• EFA Development Index provides an assessment of a country’s
education system
Challenges
• High cost of schooling
• Distance of schools
• Low school access rate (Only 66% for primary and 17% for
secondary)
• High opportunity costs for poor families – where they rather
have their children work to contribute to family income
• Language Barrier – Education is mainly conducted in French
but only 15% of Burkinabe speak French.
• The low completion rate is due to a high level of repeaters in
primary public schools
• many schools do not offer six grades of schooling
Burkina Faso compared to the
rest of Africa
• The primary school completion rate rose from 19 percent to
31 percent between 1991 and 2003 but it also remains one of
the lowest in African countries.
• Before adopting the 10 Year Basic Education Development
program, Burkina Faso had one of the weakest education
systems in the world.
Current education reform policies
adopted by the government
• Relies heavily on program-based approaches
• 10-year Basic Education Development Plan, Education for All –
Fast Track Initiative, non formal basic education program
• 10-year Basic Education Development Plan
• Aims to improve enrollment rate nationwide
• Education for All – Fast Track Initiative
• Aims to close financial gaps that prevent the success of education
goals
• Non formal basic education program
• Aims to give vocational education to children who dropped out of
school or never went to school
10-Year Basic Education
Development Plan
• Adopted by Burkina Faso’s government in 2001-2002 to
develop/strengthen Burkina Faso’s educational system
• 3 principal components
• Greater access to basic education
• Increasing the supply of basic education, including alternative education,
and reducing socio-economic, regional and gender disparities
• Greater quality and effectiveness of basic education
• Improving the quality, relevance and effectiveness of basic education and
developing coherence and integration between the various levels and
styles of education
• Build capacity of institutional and system management
• Build capacity to lead, manage, and access education structures, as well as
coordinate external assistance
• Performance of program relies on:
•
•
•
•
•
Number of new contract teachers recruited within the last year
Construction of new schools
Pupil-teacher ratio in public schools
Gender equality
government/political support
• Including education expenditure as a percentage of the GDP and
government budget
• Primary education expenditure as a percentage of total education budget
• Results
• Gross enrollment rate increased from 52.9%-78.3% from 2002-2008,
the number of classes have been increased by 70% from 2002-2008
Non Formal Basic Education
• Provides basic education and vocational apprenticeship
training
• Designed to ensure a better social/economic integration into
society of young people who did not have a chance to
complete school in a formal system
• Targets out of school children aged 9-15. It is one of the
strategies in Burkina Faso designed to increase the school
enrollment rate to 70%, and literacy rate to 40%
Fast Track Initiative
• Global partnership of developing and donor countries,
agencies, NGOs, and private/public foundations to support the
education system in developing countries
• Support country’s education plan with increased financial
support and funding, closing financial gaps that prevent the
goals.
• Mobilize resources, and align with country’s development
priorities
Historical Education Trends
Primary school enrollment (% gross)
Data from World Bank
Historical Education Trends
Secondary school enrollment (% gross)
Data from World Bank
Historical Education Trends
Tertiary school enrollment (% gross)
Data from World Bank
Historical Education Trends
Ratio of female to male primary enrollment
(%)
Data from World Bank
Historical Education Trends
Ratio of female to male secondary
enrollment (%)
Data from World Bank
Historical Education Trends
Ratio of female to male tertiary enrollment
(%)
Data from World Bank
Historical Education Trends
Adult literacy rate
(% of people ages 15 and above)
Data from World Bank
World Bank’s role in BF’s
education development
• The 1st Education Project (1973-1980)
• support rural youth training programs
• promote science education in secondary schools
• The 2nd Education Project (1979 -1986)
• train agricultural project managers and public works personnel
• The Primary Education Development Project (1985-1994)
• expanse of primary education
• enable reduction of per pupil costs
• The 4th Education Project( 1991 -1998 )
• increase school enrollment rates
• The fifth project (since 1997)
• assist the government in promoting secondary education
World Bank’s role in BF’s
education development
• International Development Association (IDA)
• Part of the World Bank, program that reduces poverty by providing loans to
for programs boost economic and social growth, and reduce inequalities
• Supports/funds the 10-year basic education reform program
• Funded $32.6 mil out of the $110 mil program cost
• This program enabled Burkina Faso to be eligible for the Fast Track Initiative
(FTI)
• Relies heavily on political support
IDA’s Approach
• 3 phase program to support government’s 10-Year Basic Education Program
• 1) Establish a basket of coordinated funding for education reform from
various donors. (Belgium, Canada, Denmark, the European Commision,
France, the Netherlands, Sweden, and other NGOs)
• 2) Improve access to primary education in rural areas – particularly in the 20
provinces with the lowest enrollment rate, by additional construction and
rehabilitation of schools, and financing of equipment, teachers and facilities.
• 3) Support curriculum development and teacher training, and focusing
particularly to financial management, budgeting, and donor coordination.
Results of IDA
• Gross enrollment rate (2000-2006) nationwide increased from
42% (36% for girls) to 62% (55% for girls)
• Within the the 20 provinces with the lowest enrollment rate,
gross enrollment rose from 30% (24% for girls) to 47% (41% for
girls)
• Additional 550,000 kids have been enrolled in primary school
• Additional 7000 classrooms were built (mostly in rural areas)
• More than 5 mil textbooks were purchased and distributed to
students and schools
• Additional teacher recruitment and their assignment to rural
areas, the number of public teachers have increased 8% since
2000
• Better allocation of resources within the education sector
UNICEF’s role in Burkina Faso’s
education reform
• Support the Non Formal Basic Education (CEBNF) program
• Aim to establish at least 5 of these centers in each the 45
provinces in the country
• Results: Having completed the 4 year CEBNF course, students are
able to read and write in French
• Provides professional trainings, assists with construction of
buildings for these centers, and provides equipment.
• Local resource people are recruited as teachers and trained to use
“learning by doing” techniques so the students can gain practical
skills
UNICEF’s role in Burkina Faso’s
education reform
• Support the Non Formal Basic Education (CEBNF) program
• Targets out-of-school youths for a second chance for education
• Aim to establish at least 5 of these centers in each the 45 provinces
in the country
• Results: Having completed the 4 year CEBNF course, students are
able to read and write in French
• Provides professional trainings, assists with construction of buildings
for these centers, and provides equipment.
• Local resource people are recruited as teachers and trained to use
“learning by doing” techniques so the students can gain practical skills
• Support the development of the cycle literacy/basic education
• Students’ parents association
• Mothers Educators Associations
• Management Committees from schools and education centers.
• Given through the state
• Average of 200 members are trained every year in literacy.
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kA5aLp4natw
Work Cited
• http://www.unicef.org/bfa/english/index.html
• http://www.intervida.org/en/publications/solidary-news/thereality-of-education-in-burkina-faso
• http://web.worldbank.org/
• http://www.mfdr.org/sourcebook/6-90BurkinaFaso-TenYear.pdf
• http://data.worldbank.org/
• http://aadcice.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/e/publications/sosho4_102.pdf
Thank you.

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