Let`s Go! 5210 Goes to Middle and High School

Report
Health and Physical Activity
Institute
Kate Alie, M.S., R.D.
Obesity Prevention Program Coordinator
Virginia Department of Health
July 17, 2012
The primary objective of the
Institute is to improve the health
and educational performance of
children through better nutrition
and physical activity instruction
in Virginia's schools.
5210 Goes to Middle and High School
Promoting Physical Activity and
Healthy Eating in
the School Environment
Epidemic
Proportions
• In 2008, the percentage of
adolescents aged 12-19
years who were obese had
more than tripled in the
past 3 decades1.
• Today’s youth may be the
first generation to have a
shorter life expectancy
than their parents2.
1Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention (2011). Adolescent and school health: Childhood obesity facts.
S.J., et. al. (1995). A potential decline in life expectancy in the United States in the 21st century. The New
England Journal of Medicine, 352 (11),1138-1145.
2Olshansky,
Virginia Youth Survey 2011
•
The Virginia Youth Survey has been developed to monitor priority health risk
behaviors that contribute markedly to the leading causes of death,
disability, and social problems among youth and adults within the
Commonwealth of Virginia.
•
The 2011 Virginia Youth Survey project was conducted by the Department of
Health in collaboration with the Department of Education using funding from
the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in randomly sampled
public high schools across the Commonwealth.
•
The school-based survey is anonymous and voluntary. The survey contains
96 questions and measures various behaviors including:
• Behaviors that contribute to injuries and violence
• Tobacco use
• Alcohol and other drug use
• Dietary habits
• Physical activity
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention prepared these graph
results. Data are also available at: www.cdc.gov/yrbs.
•
Sampling
School Level
• All regular public schools containing grades 9, 10, 11, 12 were
included in the sampling frame. Schools were selected
systematically with probability proportional to enrollment in grades
9 through 12 using a random start. 37 schools were selected and 36
schools participated.
Class Level
• All classes in a required subject or all classes meeting during a
particular period of the day, depending on the school, were included
in the sampling frame. Systematic equal probability sampling with a
random start was used to select classes from each school that
participated in the survey. 2,250 surveys were disseminated within
these classes and 1,440 surveys were completed.
Obesity
Student Methods for Weight Loss
By Gender
The 2011 Virginia Youth Survey
indicates that among students:
70
60
Male
57.4%
Female
Percent
50
40
30.8%
30
•
17.2% of students were overweight*
•
11.1% of students were obese**
•
28.1% of students described themselves
as slightly or very overweight
18.3%
20
8.2%
10
3.7%
7.1%
7.2%
3.9%
•
0
Trying to Lose
Weight
Fasted for 24 Hours
Took Diet Pills
Without Doctor's
Advice
Vomitted or Took
Laxatives
In the Past 30 Days in Order to Lose Weight or
Prevent Weight Gain
* at or above the 85th percentile but below the 95th percentile for body mass index, by age and sex
** at or above the 95th percentile for body mass index, by age and sex
43.8% of students were trying to lose
weight
Physical Activity & Nutrition
Physical Activity
•
45.6% were physically active for 60 minutes
on 5 or more of the past 7 days
•
31.1% watched 3 or more hours of TV per day
•
50.1% attended PE Class at least once a
week
Nutrition
•
59.4% ate green salad at least one in the
past week
•
Fruit and Vegetable Consumption
Among Virginia Students
Vegetables
82.9%
Green Salad
59.4%
Fruit
85.4%
100% Fruit Juice
78.4%
85.4% ate fruit at least once in the past
week
•
Consumed Indicated Product One or
More Times per Day for the Past Week
The 2011 Virginia Youth Survey
indicates that among students:
17.5% ate fruits and vegetables 5 or more
times a day in the past seven days
0
50
Percent
100
Virginia is working to meet Healthy
People 2020 targets for:
90.0%
82.6%
80.0%
70.0%
60.0%
73.9%
68.8%
Virginia
HP 2020
70.6%
50.0%
40.0%
36.6%
30.0%
20.0%
17.7%
10.0%
0.0%
Watched television for no more Played video or computer games or Went to physical education 5 days
than two hours per day on average used a computer (for non school
during average school week
school day
work) for no more than two hours
per day on average school day
2011 Virginia Health Survey
Low-Cost, High
Calorie Foods
More TV and
Screen time
Unhealthy Eating
Cuts in
Physical Activity,
Physical Education
& Recess
Increase in
Portion Sizes
&
Lack of Physical
SodaActivity
& Other HighSugar Beverage
Consumption
Changing Built
Environment
Increase in
Dining Out
People are more
sedentary
Let’s Go!
As a Nation, We Care
Economic
• Billions in healthcare costs, lost productivity,
disability
Healthcare
• Excess weight and fat can cause major illnesses
in childhood which can lead to major diseases
in adulthood
National Security
• Being overweight or obese is the leading
medical reason why applicants fail to qualify
for military service.
All Preventable
Other Causes ofcauses
Death Related
to Physical
InactivityStates
and Poor
of death
in the United
Nutrition
Tobacco smoking
High blood pressure
Overweight-obesity (high BMI)
Physical inactivity
High blood glucose
High LDL cholesterol
High dietary salt
Low dietary omega-3 fatty acids
High dietary trans fatty acids
Alcohol use
Low intake of fruits and vegetables
Low dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids
0
50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500
Deaths attributable to individual risks (thousands) in both sexes
Danaei G, Ding EL, Mozafarrian D, et al. The preventable causes of death in the United States: Comparative risk assessment of dietary, lifestyle, and
metabolic risk factors. PLoS Medicine 2009; 6(4): http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000058
As a Community We Care!
Health problems in
childhood
Type II diabetes
Joint problems
High blood pressure
High cholesterol
Asthma
Sleep apnea
Depression
Low self-esteem
Fatty liver disease
Skin problems
Early puberty in girls
Potential increased risk as
adult
Heart attack and stroke
Cancer—{esophagus, colorectal,
breast, endometrial & kidney}
Gallbladder disease
Kidney stones
Osteoarthritis
Pregnancy complications
As Schools
Studies
Have Shown:
We Care!
Students who eat
healthy and are
physically Benefits
active are
Academic
of
more
likely to
perform
Physical
Activity
better academically
&
Healthy Eating
Adequate physical
activity helps improve
classroom behavior
A+
The “Home” Away From Home
How do we get started?
1
Four Easy Steps…
1. Go to www.letsgo.org
2
2. Click on Toolkits
3. Select School from drop down box
4. Click on 5210 Goes to Middle School and
High School Toolkit picture
Wahlah!
Evidence-based Strategies &
Environmental Changes
Inside Toolkit
• Eight Tabs:
• Getting Started
• Empowering Youth
• Activities for Schools
• Partner with and Educate Families
• Partner with Food and Nutrition Programs
• Staff Wellness
• Body Mass Index (BMI)
• Resources
Empowering Youth
• Team Approach
• Sharing workload
• Reducing time commitment
• Enhancing creativity and support
• Why Involve Youth?
• Benefits such as peer leaders and sustainability
building
• Resources for Effective Youth Group Work
Activities
• 14 Activities
• Go, Slow, Whoa in Cafeteria
Snackwise®
• Media project
• Make your own sugar bottle display
• Intercom activities – 5210 Trivia & Facts of the Day
• Activity room
Partner with and Engage Families
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Letter to parents
5210 tips
Healthy Shopping on a Budget
Understanding Food Labels
Importance of Breakfast
Family Meals
Eating Fruits and Veggies Year Round
Portion Control
Adding Fiber to Meals
Non-Food Reward Ideas for Middle and High School
26 total!!!
Resources
• Wellness Policy Resources
• www.actionforhealthykids.org
• Fuel Up to Play 60
• Free Promotional Materials
• Select Resources
Select Resources
• Elementary Nutrition and Physical Activity Curriculum
• Eat Well & Keep Moving
• www.eatwellandkeepmoving.org
• 46 lesson plans and microunits, CD-ROM, 300 handouts
• $59.00
• Middle School Nutrition and Physical Activity Curriculum
• Planet Health
• www.planet-health.org
• 35 lessons and 31 microunits that promote nutrition
and physical activity
• $59.00
Resources
Engaging partners
Dates for Healthy Celebrations – healthy snacks
Healthy Body Image Resources
School Gardens
Facts & Figures About TV Viewing
Reducing Teen Screen Time
ACES (All Children Exercise Simultaneously)
• http://www.lensaunders.com/aces/aces.html
• Physical Activity and Academic Achievement
• Tips
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Health Education SOL’s
Knowledge & Skills
6.1 c
6.2 a, b, c
Information Access &
Use
Community Health &
Wellness
6.6 a, b, c
7.2 a, b, d, e
7.4 a, e
7.5 a, b
8.1 a, b, g
8.2 d
8.3 a, b
8.4 a, b, c
9.1 a, b, d, e
9.2 a, c
9.4 a, b
10.1 a, b
10.2 g
10.4 a, b, c, d
9.5 a, c
Tri-focal Approach
Lasting Change
Activities
Start, Refresh, Maintain
Tri-focal approach at work
Policy Change: Physical activity
as a reward is recommended or
required.
Environmental Change: Stability
balls in the classroom and
creation of a fitness room.
Activity: Hosting a parent event
about the importance of
increased physical activity
Successful
Lasting Change
Activities
Start, Refresh, Maintain
Toolkits, Training & Support
Questions?
For more information contact:
Kate Alie, MS, RD
Obesity Prevention Program Coordinator
804-864-7730
[email protected]

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