Unit 3 Review

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English
Unit 3
Test Review
Action Verbs
Action Verbs:
An action verb shows
what the subject of the
sentence does or did.
Action Verbs:
Name the action verbs in
the following sentences:
Bob has a spider that
eats people, so he locks
him up in a cage.
Bob has a spider that
eats people, so he locks
him up in a cage.
The sailors’ hats flew in
the strong wind when
the hurricane struck.
The sailors’ hats flew in
the strong wind when
the hurricane struck.
The basset hound ate
the hot dog then
devoured the bun.
The basset hound ate
the hot dog then
devoured the bun.
Remember:
An action verb shows
what the subject of the
sentence does or did.
Direct Objects
Some sentences express
a complete thought with
only a subject and an
action verb.
Ex.: The ship sails.
In other sentences, a
direct object is used
with the action verb.
Ex.: Ann bought a piano.
A direct object is a word
in the predicate that
receives the action of
the verb.
Ex.: He played baseball.
A direct object answers
the question What? or
Whom? after the verb.
The captain steers the
big ship.
Steers what?
ship
The captain calls the
crew.
Calls whom?
crew
When naming the direct
object, don’t name any
other words like adjectives
(big) or articles (the, a).
The warrior battled
the enormous,
menacing monster.
The warrior battled
the enormous,
menacing monster.
Direct Objects:
Name the action verb
and the direct object in
the following sentences:
The company held a
meeting.
The company held a
meeting.
Sarah was really sad, so
she hugged her favorite
toy.
Sarah was really sad, so
she hugged her favorite
toy.
Jamie had a cat that
was very mean.
Jamie had a cat that
was very mean.
They discussed the
stadium at the
meeting.
They discussed the
stadium at the
meeting.
Slowpoke beat
Crazyfast in a race!
Slowpoke beat
Crazyfast in a race!
After the race,
Crazyfast stomped
the ground in anger.
After the race,
Crazyfast stomped
the ground in anger.
Slowpoke celebrated
the victory by eating
some flowers.
Slowpoke celebrated
the victory by eating
some flowers.
Crazyfast lamented
the terrible loss for
three weeks.
Crazyfast lamented
the terrible loss for
three weeks.
Remember:
A direct object is a word
in the predicate that
receives the action of
the verb.
Ex.: He played baseball.
Helping Verbs
A helping verb works
with the main verb to
make the sentence sound
correct.
The helping verb and the
main verb form
the verb phrase.
HELPING VERB (is)
+
MAIN VERB (winning)
=
VERB PHRASE
(is winning)
Common helping verbs:
am, is, are, was, were,
will, shall, have, has,
had, can, should, would,
could
Helping Verbs:
Name the helping verb and
the main verb in the
following sentences.
The Chargers have
practiced for months.
The Chargers have
practiced for months.
The cheerleaders are
creating new cheers.
The cheerleaders are
creating new cheers.
The football schedule
was planned last
summer.
The football schedule
was planned last
summer.
The band is rehearsing
every day.
The band is rehearsing
every day.
The excited students will
get their tickets
tomorrow.
The excited students will
get their tickets
tomorrow.
The defender is tackling
the runner.
The defender is tackling
the runner.
The runner was fumbling
the ball.
The runner was fumbling
the ball.
A player will be passing
the ball soon.
A player will be passing
the ball soon.
A player on the other
team caught it.
A player on the other
team caught it.
(no helping verb)
He had waited for the
perfect opportunity.
He had waited for the
perfect opportunity.
Remember:
A helping verb works
with the main verb to
make the sentence sound
correct.
Linking Verbs
A linking verb links the
subject of the sentence
with a word (or words)
in the predicate.
A linking verb does not
show action or help a
main verb.
Here is where it gets
tricky:
She looks out the
window.
She looks tired.
Here’s your first tip:
She looks out the
window.
(action)
She looks tired (to me).
(linking)
It tasted funny.
He tasted candy.
It tasted funny (to me).
(linking)
He tasted candy.
(action)
Tip:
Ask yourself if the subject
is actually doing the verb.
The candy tastes sweet.
(linking)
She looks closely at the
bug. (action)
More Tips: If you can
substitute the verb ‘to be’ and
it works, then it’s linking:
She
She
She
She
looks tired.
is tired.
looks closely at the bug.
is closely at the bug.
He feels sad.
He feels water.
He feels sad.
(linking)
He feels water.
(action)
Common
linking verbs:
am, look, is, feel, are,
taste, was, smell, were,
seem, will be, appear
Tips:
‘To be’ is always linking
or helping (never action).
‘Seems’ is always linking.
1) Name the
verb.
2) Tell whether it’s
linking or action.
Gertrude Ederle
looked strong and fit.
Gertrude Ederle
looked strong and fit.
(linking)
In 1926, she seemed
ready for a test of her
ability.
In 1926, she seemed
ready for a test of her
ability. (linking)
She was the first
woman to swim the
English Channel.
She was the first
woman to swim the
English Channel.
(linking)
She swam the
distance in fewer
than 15 hours.
She swam the
distance in fewer
than 15 hours.
(action)
She set a world
record.
She set a world
record. (action)
Afterwards she
tasted some victory
champagne.
Afterwards she
tasted some victory
champagne. (action)
The French beverage
tasted delicious.
The French beverage
tasted delicious.
(linking)
The English Channel’s
currents push many
swimmers off course.
The English Channel’s
currents push many
swimmers off course.
(action)
Read the following pairs of
sentences.
Only one has a linking
verb. Name it.
For each pair (each slide), only
one word should be named.
The astronomer looked
through the microscope.
It looked like the star was
actually moving.
The astronomer looked
through the microscope.
It looked like the star was
actually moving.
Outside our house, the
squirrels are chewing on
the phone lines.
Those animals are such
pests!
Outside our house, the
squirrels are chewing on
the phone lines.
Those animals are such
pests!
The oven feels warm now,
so you can put the
brownies in.
I feel the sides of the pan
as I admire the baked
treats.
The oven feels warm now,
so you can put the
brownies in.
I feel the sides of the pan
as I admire the baked
treats.
Remember:
A linking verb links the
subject of the sentence
with a word (or words) in
the predicate.
A linking verb does not
show action or help a
main verb.
Verb Tenses
Name the correct form of
the present tense:
Jake ________ in the front of
the bus. (sit)
Name the correct form of
the present tense:
Jake sits in the front of the
bus. (sit)
Name the correct form of
the past tense:
Last year, Lisa ________ in
the front of the bus. (ride)
Name the correct form of
the past tense:
Last year, Lisa rode in the
front of the bus. (ride)
Name the correct form of
the future tense:
Next year, Lisa ________ in
the front of the bus. (ride)
Name the correct form of
the future tense:
Next year, Lisa will ride in
the front of the bus. (ride)
Name the correct form of
the present tense:
The tires of the bus ________
huge. (to be)
Name the correct form of
the present tense:
The tires of the bus are
huge. (to be)
Name the correct form of
the present tense:
A bag of apples, tomatoes,
and grapes ________ $10.
(cost)
Name the correct form of
the present tense:
A bag of apples, tomatoes,
and grapes costs $10.
(cost)
Name the correct form of
the past tense:
A nice breeze _______
through the area. (blow)
Name the correct form of
the past tense:
A nice breeze blew through
the area. (blow)
Name the correct form of
the past tense:
A nice breeze has _______
through the area for days.
(blow)
Name the correct form of
the past tense:
A nice breeze has blown
through the area for days.
(blow)
Name the correct form of
the past tense:
The old bell has ________ for
100 years. (ring)
Name the correct form of
the past tense:
The old bell has rung for
100 years. (ring)
Subject-Verb
Agreement
Your verb must agree
with your subject.
If the subject is singular,
add –s or –es to the verb.
(He teaches math.
She boards the bus.)
If the subject is plural,
the verb doesn’t change.
(They teach math.)
If the subject is I or you,
the verb doesn’t change.
(I teach math. You teach
math.)
Usually, when the verb is
correct, it simply sounds
right, but not always.
(A bag of apples and
pears costs $12.)
Name the correct form of
the present tense:
The tiger, despite all
her struggles, ___.
(survive).
The tiger, despite all
her struggles,
survives.
The tigers, despite all
their struggles, ___.
(survive).
The tigers, despite all
their struggles,
survive.
The fish, despite all
their struggles, ___.
(survive).
The fish, despite all
their struggles,
survive.
The fish, despite all its
struggles, ___.
(survive).
The fish, despite all its
struggles, survives.
Tip: Ask yourself, “Is the
subject singular or plural?”
Singular subjects can be
substituted with it, he, or she.
Plural subjects can be
substituted with they.
Each of the athletic
monkeys _________
(climb) to the top.
Each of the athletic
monkeys climbs to
the top.
Tip: ‘Each’ is a
singular word.
Both Lana and Rick
_________ (enjoy)
turkey at
Thanksgiving.
Both Lana and Rick
enjoy turkey at
Thanksgiving.
Tip: ‘Both’ is a plural
word.
Neither Tom nor Eddie
_________ (eat) mashed
potatoes.
Neither Tom nor Eddie
eats mashed potatoes.
Tip: ‘Neither’ is a
singular word.
Either Jessica or
Rachel usually
_________ (wear)
purple.
Either Jessica or
Rachel usually wears
purple.
Tip: ‘Either’ is a
singular word.
Contractions
A contraction is a word
formed by joining two
words, making one
shorter word.
An apostrophe takes the
place of the dropped
letter or letters.
I am = I’m
They will = They’ll
Write the following in
another way:
do not
do not =
don’t
doesn’t
doesn’t =
does not
did not
did not =
didn’t
isn’t
isn’t =
is not
are not
are not =
aren’t
wasn’t
wasn’t =
was not
were not
were not =
weren’t
will not
will not =
won’t
have not
have not =
haven’t
hasn’t
hasn’t =
has not
had not
had not =
hadn’t
couldn’t
couldn’t =
could not
cannot
cannot = can’t
mustn’t
mustn’t =
must not
should have
should have =
should’ve
I am
I am =
I’m
Steve is
(Steve is here.)
Steve is =
Steve’s here.
They will
They will =
They’ll
It is
It is = it’s
Irregular Verbs
Fix the following sentences (if
necessary) by rewriting the
correct form of the main verb.
Don’t change the helping verb
if there is one. If you don’t
think there’s an error, write
‘no error.’
He comed over after
school.
He came over after
school.
I brang home my work.
I brought home my work.
Warning!
‘Brang’ and ‘Brung’ are
not words! Ever!
She had went away to
camp.
She had gone away to
camp.
He has run the race
many times.
He has run the race
many times.
It had took five years to
complete the project.
It had taken five years to
complete the project.
She has written the most
wonderful book!
She has written the most
wonderful book!
Manolo has came a long
way.
Manolo has come a long
way.
These verbs are known
as irregular verbs.
When making them past
tense, we don’t follow the
regular rules.
Regular verbs are easy to
make past tense:
just add –ed.
(learned, joined)
Irregular verbs have
special forms to show
past tense.
The problem:
For most, there are no
rules. You just have to learn
them.
Another problem:
For many, there is a different
verb form that you use with a
helping verb.
This word is called the
past participle.
I go. I went. I have gone.
I see. I saw. I have seen.
Fix the following sentences (if
necessary) by rewriting the
correct form of the main verb.
Don’t change the helping verb
if there is one. If you don’t
think there’s an error, write
‘no error.’
I breaked my arm.
I broke my arm.
By midnight, the robber
had stealed 5 cars.
By midnight, the robber
had stolen 5 cars.
They had flew over the
ocean.
They had flown over the
ocean.
We had swum along that
shore many times before
the jetty was built.
We had swum along that
shore many times before
the jetty was built.
She rung the bell when
dinner was ready.
She rang the bell when
dinner was ready.
The temperature
dropped, and the pond
freezed.
The temperature
dropped, and the pond
froze.
She has broken many
swimming records.
She has broken many
swimming records.
By the time the play had
began, I was falling
asleep.
By the time the play had
begun, I was falling
asleep.
Fill in the blanks:
main: ring
past tense: _______
past participle: rung
main: ring
past tense: rang
past participle: rung
main: ______
past tense: sang
past participle: sung
main: sing
past tense: sang
past participle: sung
main: swim
past tense: swam
past participle: _______
main: swim
past tense: swam
past participle: swum
main: begin
past tense: _______
past participle: _______
main: begin
past tense: began
past participle: begun
main: ________
past tense: broke
past participle: _______
main: break
past tense: broke
past participle: broken
main: ________
past tense: ________
past participle: stolen
main: steal
past tense: stole
past participle: stolen
main: ________
past tense: grew
past participle: _______
main: grow
past tense: grew
past participle: grown
main: speak
past tense: ________
past participle: _______
main: speak
past tense: spoke
past participle: spoken
main: fly
past tense: ________
past participle: _______
main: fly
past tense: flew
past participle: flown
main: ________
past tense: wore
past participle: ________
main: wear
past tense: wore
past participle: worn
Verb Phrases
with ‘Have’
Have can be used as a
helping verb with could,
would, should, and must.
On the other hand,
of is never used as a
helping verb with could,
would, should, and must.
INCORRECT:
I should of gone.
INCORRECT:
I woulda gone.
CORRECT:
I should have gone.
CORRECT:
I should’ve gone.
Note: The test will also cover the
differences between:
teach and learn
let and leave
sit and set
can and may
Homework:
Packet due Wednesday;
Study for test
Test: Thursday

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