Bridgeport Design Institute Presentation

Report
Bridgeport Design Institute
November 13, 2014
8:30am – 2:30pm
© 2014 StriveTogether
1
WELCOME
Merle Berke-Schlessel
2
Why the Time is Right?
© 2014 StriveTogether
3
You can access the
Embargoed report at
alice.ctunitedway.org/press.
Password is:
ALICEMatters
(case sensitive)
In Bridgeport CT
Population
Households
Poverty
ALICE
Unemployment Rate
Health Insurance Coverage
Housing Burden Owner
Housing Burden Renter
Childcare & Early Education
(Pre-K readiness)
146,434
49,887
23%
32% } 55%
9.2%
76%
50%
56%
65%
(Ffld County 89.39%
Median Income
$44,640
(Ffld County $102,114)
Bridgeport Schools at a Glance
• 20,856 students in Bridgeport Public
Schools
Asian Other
2.8% 1.0%
White
9.4%
• 99.1% free or reduced-priced lunch
• 13.1% not fluent in English (English
Language Learners)
• 73 different languages spoken
• 12.7% receiving special education
services
African
American
37.9%
Latino
49.0%
United Way’s Role
Backbone Support Organization
StriveTogether
Colin Groth, Director of Strategic
Assistance
Katy Silliman, Director of Strategic
Assistance
William Thomas, Project Manager,
Strategic Assistance
Core Leadership Team
Frank Borres, CEO
American View Productions
Chairman, Citywide NRZ
Adrienne Farrar Houel, President & CEO
Greater Bridgeport Community Enterprises, Inc.
Most Reverend Frank J. Caggiano, Bishop
Diocese of Bridgeport
Bill Jennings, President & CEO
Bridgeport Hospital
Ramon Bulerin
BDI – Stratford
Danette Jones
Copious Realty Group
Joseph Carbone, President & CEO
The WorkPlace, Inc.
Delores Laws
The Dawn
Carmen Colon, Executive Director
Alpha Community Services, YMCA
Dr. Fred McKinney, President & CEO
Greater New England Minority Supplier Development Council
Pablo Colon III, Vice President
Radio Cumbre Broadcasting, Inc
Janet Ortiz, Director
Nehemiah Commission
Rosa J. Correa, Director, Strategic Relations
Career Resources, Inc.
Rabbi James Prosnit
Congregation B’nai Israel
George Estrada, Vice President for Facilities
University of Bridgeport
Frances Rabinowitz, Interim Superintendent
Bridgeport Public Schools
Anita Giliniecki, President
Housatonic Community College
Reverend Cass Shaw, President & CEO
Council of Churches of Greater Bridgeport
Armando Goncalves, Market President, Southern CT
Peoples’ United Bank
Martha K. Shouldis, Ed.D., President & CEO
St. Vincent College
Victor Tran
2014 UCONN Graduate
Donna Thompson Bennett, Curriculum Manager/Consultant
Parent Leadership Training Institute
INTERDENOMINATIONAL CLERGY
BLESSING
11
Why Are We Here Today?
Overall Meeting Result
Build infrastructure to create opportunities focused on
improving outcomes for children and families in Bridgeport.
Meeting Objectives
– Build understanding of the Cradle to Career Collective
Impact and why it is important
– Share local work to date and solicit feedback from
Design Institute participants
– Co-create and develop 180-Day Action Plan to
continue the work after today
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Definition of Collective Impact
“The commitment of a group of important actors from
different sectors to a common agenda for solving a specific
social problem.”
-- John Kania & Mark Kramer
FSG Social Impact Advisors, Stanford Social Innovation Review (Winter 2010)
© 2014 StriveTogether
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CRADLE TO CAREER IMPACT
14
Ultimate Impact
Social Return on Investment (SROI)
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Collaboration
Collective Impact
Convene around
Programs/Initiatives
Work Together to
Move Outcomes
Prove
Improve
Addition to
What You Do
Is What You Do
Advocate for Ideas
© 2014 StriveTogether
Advocate for What Works
16
© 2014 StriveTogether
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© 2014 StriveTogether
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Focus on Outcomes
• Kindergarten Readiness in Literacy
• 4th Grade Reading
• 8th Grade Math
• High School Graduation
• College Readiness
• College Entrance
• College Retention
• Degree/Certification Completion
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Proven Local Success
Percentage of Outcomes Trending Positively
89%
81%
85
74%
Percentage
80
68%
75
70
65
60
2009
2010
2011
2012
Report Card Year
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Examples of Success –
Cincinnati Public Schools
• Kindergarten Readiness Scores
– 11% increase since baseline (2005)
• 4th Grade Reading
– 16% increase since baseline (2004)
• 8th Grade Math
– 31% increase since baseline (2004)
• College Enrollment
– 7% increase since baseline (2004)
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Sample of Positive Trends
2010
2013
Kindergarten Readiness
72%
77%
3rd Grade Reading
66%
69%
4th Grade Math
50%
62%
6th Grade Reading
61%
70%
7th Grade Math
52%
60%
High School Graduation
72%
74%*
College Enrollment
60%
60%*
*High School Graduation’s 74% is Class of 2012 numbers
*College Enrollment 60% is Class of 2012 numbers
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Sample of Positive Trends
2013
Early Literacy
54%
59%
3rd Grade Reading
31%
32%
8th Grade Math
4%
38%
MCAS Tests
44%
55%
Annual
Dropout Rate
7.3%
6.4%
4-yr Grad Rate
61.4%
65.9%
35%*
49.3%*
High School
Completion
2008
College Completion
*College Completion- Base is Class of 2000, Current is Class of 2006
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Exploring- 21
© 2014 StriveTogether
Emerging- 41
Sustaining- 12
24
25
Abbreviated
Theory of Action
GATEWAYS:
Exploring
Pillar 2:
Evidence
Based Decision
Making
Geographic Scope
Leadership Table
Vision/ Mission
Key Messaging
• Outcomes
• Indicators
Sustaining
• Baseline Report
• Roles/
Responsibilities
• Annual Progress
Report
• Consistent
Messaging
• Shared
Accountability
• Withstand
Leadership
Change
• Baseline Data
Collection
• Disaggregated
Data
• Indicator
Refinement
• Connection of
Academic & Non
Academic Data
• Timely Data
Sharing for
Continuous
Improvement
• Spread What
Works For
Children and
Youth
• Policy Changes
• Multiyear Funding
Commitment
Pillar 3:
Collaborative
Action
• Continuous
Improvement
Commitment
• Community
Action Networks
• Action to Move
Outcomes
• Opportunities &
Barriers Addressed
Pillar 4:
Investment &
Sustainability
• Anchor Entity/
Backbone
Functions
• Funder
Engagement
• Management
Capacity
• Financial Support
• Community
Mobilization
• Aligned Resources
• Advocacy
BUILDING
Systems Change
Proof
Point
A Partnership is in the Systems Change Gateway and
sees indicators improving.
Pillar 1: Shared
Community
Vision
•
•
•
•
Emerging
IMPACT
Pre-Work Overview
• September 2013 United Way (support of BOA and GE) brought
Jeff Edmondson from StriveTogether to Bridgeport to discuss the
possibility of building a cradle to career civic infrastructure in
Bridgeport.
• While attendees said “Yes” when asked if this work was worth
pursuing, there was a clear expression of caution given the
erosion of trust, high level of fatigue and conflicting agendas.
• As a result, United Way (UW) committed to significant additional
pre-work to:
 Gain additional input/insights
 Demonstrate inclusiveness/promote broad engagement
 Build understanding of Collective Impact
 Help raise the dialog
 Identify the right leadership
 Determine next steps
Pre-Work Continued…
Engagement/Input-
• Over 150+ interviews
conducted
• Input Summarized
(Attributes for Leadership
Team, Candidate
Recommendations,
Consensus Observations,
Recommendations)
Communications• Issued White Paper
• Developed one page basic
Information Sheet
• Established webpage/very
basic
• Partnership with Sacred
Heart School of
Management/Effective
Communication Strategies
Project
• Ongoing expansion of
communication list
Core Leadership Team Attributes
• Servant leaders/no agenda
• Neutral (not immediately polarizing)/community
credibility
• Diverse/culturally competent/community competent
• Influencers/not all the same old/can keep the order
• Cross walkers/can help bridge divides
• Can model respect, forgiveness, active listening,
transparency, can consider different opinions, values
talents and assets of the community
• Willingness/courage to lead in difficult times
Consensus Observations
• Community is deeply divided/feelings are much more personal and difficult to
recover from
• Trust is hard to come by/ certain groups or individuals are significantly more
polarizing and need to be part of the larger engagement but not seen as leading
the effort
• Community wants to move forward to make positive impact but is rudderless at
the moment
• Concerns exist about how CI will impact funding /resource allocation- “Will this
take money away from the community?”
• The community is changing and the traditional distribution of power and
influence is not the future
• Leadership needs to be developed/long time lock on leadership positions has
stifled new leadership potential/diminished energy, enthusiasm, innovation
• Strategies/actions need to be sustainable and have community ownership/buy
in
• Funders must not set the agenda but should support the agenda
Recommendations
• Cannot be owned or driven by United Way/Board. Core Leadership Team and
community must lead (UW is the support organization). The community will
listen and watch this carefully.
• United Way should engage other organizations to provide backbone functions in
areas they are expert in. This will not only avoid duplication and leverage
community assets, it can help model servant leadership/collaboration/setting
differences aside, etc…
• Prior to diving into outcomes/measures/evidence/investment, the Core
Leadership Team must get out into the community to listen and learn with
authenticity and help/model/pursue truth telling and forgiveness work to help
with healing and trust building.
• Core Values and Guiding Principles for the initiative should be developed very
early on.
• Communications must be transparent, culturally relevant, frequent and
authentic.
• Extensive, ongoing, daily, work must be undertaken to promote broad
community level engagement and further develop an understanding of the
initiative.
What the Community had to say…
“We can not surrender.”
“We have many assets in Bridgeport that we need to tap.”
“The voice of divisiveness can not continue louder than the voice of
unity.”
“We need to replace the anger and hatred with love and
understanding. We owe this to our children.”
“We can make progress if we are inclusive and if we don’t leave
residents on the outside looking in.”
“Our children need to see our leaders working together to solve
problems regardless of our differences.”
“We need to focus positively. People are tired of the ugly, negative
dynamics.”
“We need to respect one another even if we have differences.”
Core Leadership Team
Frank Borres, CEO
American View Productions
Chairman, Citywide NRZ
Adrienne Farrar Houel, President & CEO
Greater Bridgeport Community Enterprises, Inc.
Most Reverend Frank J. Caggiano, Bishop
Diocese of Bridgeport
Bill Jennings, President & CEO
Bridgeport Hospital
Ramon Bulerin
BDI – Stratford
Danette Jones
Copious Realty Group
Joseph Carbone, President & CEO
The WorkPlace, Inc.
Delores Laws
The Dawn
Carmen Colon, Executive Director
Alpha Community Services, YMCA
Dr. Fred McKinney, President & CEO
Greater New England Minority Supplier Development Council
Pablo Colon III, Vice President
Radio Cumbre Broadcasting, Inc
Janet Ortiz, Director
Nehemiah Commission
Rosa J. Correa, Director, Strategic Relations
Career Resources, Inc.
Rabbi James Prosnit
Congregation B’nai Israel
George Estrada, Vice President for Facilities
University of Bridgeport
Frances Rabinowitz, Interim Superintendent
Bridgeport Public Schools
Anita Giliniecki, President
Housatonic Community College
Reverend Cass Shaw, President & CEO
Council of Churches of Greater Bridgeport
Armando Goncalves, Market President, Southern CT
Peoples’ United Bank
Martha K. Shouldis, Ed.D., President & CEO
St. Vincent College
Victor Tran
2014 UCONN Graduate
Donna Thompson Bennett, Curriculum Manager/Consultant
Parent Leadership Training Institute
Role of Core Leadership Team
• Champion Vision
• Affirm Direction
• Promote the Initiative
• Encourage Broad Engagement
• Advocate for What Works
• Keep the Order
• Model and Enforce Core Values and Guiding
Principals
DRAFT- Accountability
Structure
CORE
LEADERSHIP
TEAM
OPERATIONS/IMPLEMENTA
TION TEAM
OUTCOMES
COMMU
NITY
ACTION
NETWO
RK
COMMU
NITY
ACTION
NETWO
RK
FUNDER
S TABLE
COMMU
NITY
ACTION
NETWO
RK
COMMU
NITY
ACTION
NETWO
RK
DATA
TABLE
COMMU
NITY
ACTION
NETWO
RK
Where is Bridgeport in the
StriveTogether Theory of Action?
Bridgeport is in the Exploring Gateway.
 We are engaging partners
 We have defined our scope to all of Bridgeport
 We are working today to select community level outcomes
 We have seated a Core Leadership Team
 We have United Way serving as the Backbone/Anchor Organization
In order to move to the Emerging Gateway, Bridgeport still needs to:
 Formalize a set of messages that are aligned and communicated across
the initiative
 Finalize community level outcomes and select core indicators/measures
 Engage funders to support the work
Exploring Gateway (Design Phase)
Pillar 1: Shared
Community
Vision
A cross-sector
Partnership with a
defined geographic
scope organizes
around a cradle to
career vision.
Pillar 2:
Evidence
Based Decision
Making
Pillar 3:
Collaborative
Action
Pillar 4:
Investment &
Sustainability
A cross-sector
leadership table is
convened with a
documented
accountability
structure.
The Partnership formalizes
a set of messages that are
aligned and effectively
communicated across
partners and the
community.
The Partnership selects
community level
outcomes to be held
accountable for
improving.
The Partnership selects
core indicators for the
community level
outcomes.
The Partnership
commits to using
continuous
improvement to guide
the work.
An anchor entity is established and capacity to
support the daily management of the partnership is
in place.
The Partnership engages funders to support the
operations and collaborative work of partners to
improve outcomes.
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CHARGE AND COMMITMENT
38
Shared Community Vision
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Pillar 1: Shared
Community
Vision
A cross-sector
Partnership with a
defined geographic
scope organizes
around a cradle to
career vision.
A cross-sector
leadership table is
convened with a
documented
accountability
structure.
The Partnership formalizes
a set of messages that are
aligned and effectively
communicated across
partners and the
community.
40
National Definitions
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Key Lessons
• Make it a movement!
• The K.I.S.S. Principle:
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Partnership Name
Vision
Mission
Tagline
The Strive Partnership Every Child, Every Step To create a world-class Every Child. Every Step
(Cincinnati, OH)
of the Way, Cradle to
education system
of the Way. Cradle to
Career
where every student
Career.
succeeds from birth
through college
The Big Goal
Collaborative
(Northeast Indiana)
A top global
competitor, exceeding
the expectations of
businesses and
residents
To develop, attract
and retain talent
Success of All Youth
(Oak Park-River
Forest, IL)
Oak Park and River
Forest are
communities that
meet the diverse
developmental needs
of all their youth.
The communities of
Oak Park and River
Forest will engage
their community
partners to coordinate
and align priorities,
efforts and resources
to empower every
youth to reach his/her
full potential.
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Vision and Mission
• Vision-Where are we trying to go?
• Mission-Why is this initiative here?
Community Input to Date
Vision-Where are we trying
to go?
• To a place where we work much broader
than just in the K-12 schools.
• Where all people feel included and have a
voice.
• Where young people and families are
empowered and feel safe and supported.
• Where families experience prosperity and
businesses experience a ready workforce.
• Where we feel health, vibrancy and
hopefulness in community.
• Where we listen to one another, work
through differences constructively and
model for our children the kind of
leadership and action that brings better
outcomes.
Mission-Why is this initiative
here?
• To support young people throughout the
entire cradle to career continuum.
• To give hope and embrace the
possibilities for all children.
• To achieve better results by working
together and aligning.
• Because all talent is important to the
future.
• To bolster pride in Bridgeport.
• To make sure young people can see a
pathway to good jobs.
• To ensure a healthy and strong
community.
• To make sense of what is working and
what is not.
Key Words (Ideas) to Consider
Community, Unity, Equity, Commitment, Honesty
Inclusiveness, Empowering (Families),Respect,
Success, Achievement, Hope, Growth, Diversity,
Forward Movement, Broad Community Effort, Family
Support, School Transition, Systems, Long-term,
Health, Safety, Connected, Progressive, Visionary,
Grounded in Values, Wholeness, Pathways, Honesty,
Transparency, Positive Action, Accountability,
Perseverance, New, Comprehensive, Different, Broad,
Openess, Contribution, Service, Dignity, Civility.
Words that Evoke Some Concern
• Partnership (Seemed closed/or exclusive to folks)
• Excellent or Excellence (Over used, seemed to
remind folks of other initiatives)
• Future (Some folks seemed to get reminded of
Bridgeport Futures an initiative from the 90’s)
• Education (Seemed to narrow)
• Reform (Seemed to have a negative connotation
and make folks think about Education Reform
efforts)
• Collaborative (Doesn’t go far enough, overused)
Some names that have been
suggested so far
• Bridgeport CAN!
• Bridgeport United!
• Uniting for Children and Families!
Draft Vision and Mission
Statements to React to
Vision- Where are we trying
to go?
• Building a healthy, vibrant
community where all
families experience
wholeness, dignity and
prosperity.
• Creating a well-educated
and prosperous community
that can thrive.
• To constantly improve the
systems required to
promote a safe, healthy
and educated environment
for our citizenry.
Mission-Why is the initiative
here?
• To work collectively as a
community of stakeholders
to have a positive impact on
the lives of our residents.
• To prepare our families for
lives of meaning and
prosperity by setting the
new course in Bridgeport:
through improved
outcomes and solid
supports which ensure the
success of our students,
businesses and community.
Table Exercise
These are early draft vision and mission
statements to work from:
• Do any of these capture who we (the
initiative) are and what we are trying to reach
for children and families in Bridgeport?
• If close, would you offer a revision? If not,
what new vision/mission statements would
you suggest?
• Initiative Naming Challenge!
© 2014 StriveTogether
50
Draft Vision and Mission
Statements to React to
Vision- Where are we trying
to go?
• Building a healthy, vibrant
community where all
families experience
wholeness, dignity and
prosperity.
• Creating a well-educated
and prosperous community
that can thrive.
• To constantly improve the
systems required to
promote a safe, healthy
and educated environment
for our citizenry.
Mission-Why is the initiative
here?
• To work collectively as a
community of stakeholders
to have a positive impact on
the lives of our residents.
• To prepare our families for
lives of meaning and
prosperity by setting the
new course in Bridgeport:
through improved
outcomes and solid
supports which ensure the
success of our students,
businesses and community.
BREAK
52
Evidence Based Decision Making
© 2014 StriveTogether
53
Pillar 2:
Evidence
Based Decision
Making
The Partnership selects
community level
outcomes to be held
accountable for
improving.
The Partnership selects
core indicators for the
community level
outcomes.
54
Key Lessons
• “True North”
• “Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good…”
• “People say you can lie with data but you can
lie a whole heck of a lot easier without it…”
• “Data is the translator…”
© 2014 StriveTogether
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Outcomes
Points along the cradle to career education
continuum that are proven to be key levers that
need to be moved in order to achieve the cradle to
career vision and goals.
Examples:
Outcomes
© 2014 StriveTogether
•
•
•
•
•
•
Kindergarten Readiness
Early Grade Reading
Middle Grade Math
High School Graduation
Enrollment into Postsecondary
Degree Completion
56
Core Indicators
Specific measures that are being used to track progress
on moving the community level outcomes and has
been agreed upon to be the main metric, or one that
directly measures an outcome.
Example:
Core Indicators
Outcomes
© 2014 StriveTogether
Early Grade Reading = Percent
of 3rd grade students assessed
as proficient
57
Example Criteria for Selecting
Outcomes/Indicators for Report Card
Population Based
Valid Measure
Easily Understandable
Reasonably Similar
Trusted Source
Ability to be Compared
Affordable to Gather and Report
Available Consistently
© 2014 StriveTogether
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StriveTogether “Big Six”
Outcomes
Kindergarten
Readiness
© 2014 StriveTogether
Early Grade
Reading
Middle Grade
Math
High School
Graduation
Post-secondary
Enrollment
Post-Secondary
Completion
59
Camden Education Alliance Final
Vision
Community where all children graduate highly trained and enter into a globally competitive workforce.
Mission
To serve all children and families with high quality education and training.
Outcomes
Kindergarten
Readiness
Early Grade
Reading
Indicators
• Percent of
children assessed
as ready for school
at Kindergarten
• Percent of
children proficient
at third grade
reading
Contributing
Indicators
• Percent of
children enrolled
into a quality preschool program
•Percent of
children assessed
as socially/
emotionally ready
• Percent of
children who are
chronically absent
• Percent of ELL /
ESL children
•Percent of
children literacy
proficient in 2nd
grade
© 2014 StriveTogether
Middle Grade
Math
• Percent of
children proficient
in fifth grade math
• Percent of
children proficient
in eight grade
math
• Percent of
children who are
chronically absent
•Percent of
children enrolled
into Algebra or an
after-school
enrichment
program
High School
Graduation
Post-secondary
Enrollment
• Percent of
children who
graduate form high
school
• Percent of
children who enroll
in a post-secondary
institution within
six months of
graduation
• Percent of
children credit
deficient by 10th
grade
• Percent of
children dropping
out
•Percent of
children with
disciplinary issues
• Percent of
children scoring
“college ready” on
ACT/SAT
• Percent of
children
completing FAFSA
•Percent of
children applying
to college
Post-Secondary
Completion
•
•Percent of children
who graduate from a
local post-secondary
institution
• Percent of children
who earn a
certification
•Percent of children
still enrolled after 1
year
•Percent of children
needing 2 or more
remedial courses
•Percent of children
still enrolled 2nd year
60
LOCAL DATA
61
Infant Health
• 16.5% of Bridgeport mothers receive late
or no prenatal care during their
pregnancies
• 8% of all Bridgeport babies born with
low birthweight
• 6.4 infant deaths per 1,000 live births
Source: CT State Department of Health, Vital Statistics, Annual Registration Reports 2010,
http://www.ct.gov/dph/cwp/view.asp?a=3132&q=394598&dphNav_GID=1601
Kindergarten Readiness
50
45
Percent of Students
40
35
2008-09
30
2009-10
25
2010-11
2011-12
20
15
10
5
0
Language
Skills
Creative /
Aesthetic
Literacy
Numeracy
Social /
Emotional
Kindergarten Entrance Inventory Results, Students at Level 3
Source: CT State Department of Education, Strategic School Profiles, CEDaR Home, Detailed tables
http://sdeportal.ct.gov/Cedar/WEB/ct_report/DTHome.aspx
Kindergarten Readiness
49.6%
49.4%
44.2%
39.0%
44.2%
43.1%
37.6%
39.8%
39.2%
35.7%
33.3%
31.5%
State
Bridgeport
Language
Creative /
Aesthetic
Literacy
Numeracy
Personal /
Social
Physical Motor
Kindergarten Entrance Inventory Results, % Students at Level 3, 2011-12
Source: CT State Department of Education, Strategic School Profiles, CEDaR Home, Detailed tables
http://sdeportal.ct.gov/Cedar/WEB/ct_report/DTHome.aspx
Early Grade Reading
3rd Grade Reading
 40.4% met proficiency
 21.4% met goal
2013 CMT (Connecticut Mastery Tests)
Source: CT State Department of Education, http://solutions1.emetric.net/cmtpublic/Index.aspx
Middle School Math
8th Grade Math
 62.8% met proficiency
 33.7% met goal
2013 CMT (Connecticut Mastery Tests)
Source: CT State Department of Education, http://solutions1.emetric.net/cmtpublic/Index.aspx
High School Graduation
Percent of Students
80.0%
70.0%
60.0%
55.5%
66.3%
67.3%
Class of 2012
Class of 2013
60.5%
50.0%
40.0%
30.0%
20.0%
10.0%
0.0%
Class of 2010
Class of 2011
Cumulative Graduation Rate, Bridgeport Public Schools
* Members of the Class who graduated within four years of starting high school
Source: CT State Department of Education (SDE), Strategic School Profile 2011-12; SDE, CEDaR Home, Detailed tables;
http://sdeportal.ct.gov/Cedar/WEB/ct_report/DTHome.aspx; MMulford, email, 7/22/14
Post-Secondary Enrollment
18.5% unknown
12.3% employed**
69.2% pursuing
higher education*
Activities of Bridgeport High School Graduates, Class of 2011
*degree (2- and 4-year schools) and non-degree
**civilian employment and armed services
Source: CT State Department of Education, Strategic School Profiles, CEDaR Home, Detailed tables
http://sdeportal.ct.gov/Cedar/WEB/ct_report/DTHome.aspx
Post-Secondary Degree Completion
55.3%
Enrollment Rate
Graduation Rate
15.0%
Post-Secondary School
Enrollment and Graduation Rate, Bridgeport Class of 2004
Source: “Connecticut High Schools and Post-Secondary Outcomes,” Gabriel Zucker and David Carel, May 3, 2012
Post-Secondary Degree Completion
9.5%
Bachelor's degree or
higher
44.9%
Some college or
associate's degree
17.5%
Less than high school
graduate
28.2%
High school graduate
Educational Attainment Adults Aged 18-24, 2012
Source: American Community Survey 2012; http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table
Workforce
• 10.1% Bridgeport adults in the labor force
were unemployed in June 2014, compared
to 6.3% statewide
• 53.4% Bridgeport youth ages 16-19 and looking for
work were unemployed in 2012
Sources: DT Department of Labor, http://www1.ctdol.state.ct.us/lmi/laus/lmi123.asp; U.S. Census, American Community Survey,
http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_12_1YR_S2301&prodType=table
What the Community Had to Say
About Outcomes
• Jobs, Jobs, Jobs. Local jobs. Jobs for youth. Pathways to jobs. Let’s take a really hard look at
this!
• Kindergarten readiness, third grade reading, meeting grade level expectations and
increasing the High School graduation rate are really important.
• The big six are good but not broad enough.
• Need an outcome focus prior to Kindergarten readiness.
• Need to focus past secondary credentials and really measure progress in workforce
entrance/career success.
• The outcomes need to span the entire cradle to career continuum.
• Is there a way to focus an outcome around Family Skill building ( this could include
strengthening parenting skills, basic skills, job skills, financial literacy skills and knowledge
and connection to resources)
• Indicators/measures and work at the Community Action tables needs to focus beyond
academic achievement. The focus should be broad and include health, social emotional
and other indicators in addition to the focus on academic measures.
• Is there a way to impact and measure youth engagement in positive activities?
Office of Mayor Bill Finch
City of Bridgeport
Presented to the Strive Together Collective Impact Community of Bridgeport
November 13, 2014
Bridgeport Accepts President Obama’s
My Brother’s Keeper Community Challenge
Community leaders gathered alongside Mayor Bill Finch and Congressman Himes to announce
that the state’s largest city had accepted the President’s Challenge (October 31st, 2014).
ABOUT THE MY BROTHER'S KEEPER
COMMUNITY CHALLENGE


The My Brother’s Keeper Community Challenge (MBK) is a national
call to action for communities (cities, counties, and Tribal Nations) to
develop and execute a cradle-to-college and career strategy to
improve life outcomes for all youth, consistent with the goals and
recommendations of the My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) Task Force’s
May 28, 2014 report, to ensure that all young people can achieve
their full potential regardless of who they are, where they come
from, or the circumstances into which they are born.
By accepting the My Brother's Keeper Community Challenge,
communities commit to convene key stakeholders to get involved
locally, to implement proven strategies for improving the life
outcomes of young people, to measure their successes and setbacks,
and to share their plans to help communities learn from one another.
About MBK Continued
“All the communities doing My Brother’s Keeper and
other federal initiatives like it are going to need to
do rigorous “collective impact” if they’re going to
do it right.” –Jim Shelton, Deputy Secretary, U.S.
Department of Education.
About MBK Continued






In other words: “We are not reinventing the wheel”
Early open and honest conversations with Rina Bakalar
and Merle Berke-Schlessel to discuss MBK and Collective
Impact interest and concerns
Support gained from Collective Impact and MBK
National offices
Agreed not to develop competing initiatives in
Bridgeport
Mayor’s Office – thoughtful to the Collective Impact
community’s process and journey already in progress
Cognizant that we are talking about the same children
LAYING THE GROUNDWORK FOR
MBK IN COLLECTIVE IMPACT




Accept the President’s Challenge (Mayor)
Convene a “Local Action Summit” to build an MBK
Community (aligned with Collective Impact)
Conduct a policy review and form recommendations
for action (aligned with Collective Impact)
Launch a plan of action, next steps and a timetable
for review (aligned with Collective Impact)
THE SIX GOALS OF THE CHALLENGE ARE:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Ensuring all children enter school cognitively, physically,
socially and emotionally ready
Ensuring all children read at grade level by 3rd grade
Ensuring all youth graduate from high school
Ensuring all youth complete post-secondary education
or training
Ensuring all youth out of school are employed
Ensuring all youth remain safe from violent crime
What will that look like?

Dedicated to searching ways to introduce or
expand on existing efforts to better serve the needs
of the city’s youth in two MBK areas:
 Ensuring
all children enter school cognitively, physically,
socially and emotionally ready
 Ensuring all youth remain safe from violent crime and
are provided a second chance


Introduces new partners to the table
Elevating data points for young men of color at
Collective Impact tables
Questions?

Questions ?
Mayor’s Office Contact

Lamond Daniels
 [email protected]
 203.

576-7201
Indra Sen
 [email protected]
 203.
576-7201
BRIDGEPORT YOUTH

Reducing Crime and Violence in Our City
 In 1985 there were 300,000 people in prison in the United States
 In 2014 there are 2.3 million people in prison in the United
States
 A Black man is 7 times more likely to be arrested and
incarcerated than a white man committing the same offense
 A Hispanic male is 4 times more likely to be arrested and
incarcerated than a white man committing the same offense
Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow, 2013
BRIDGEPORT YOUTH
 The overall Bridgeport crime rate has steadily declined over the last 20 years
 Since 2004 the juvenile crime rate in Bridgeport has been drastically reduced
from 1,472 to 549 in 2012
 There has been an increase in violent juvenile crime as evidenced by
increased number of Bridgeport youth in juvenile detention and the
Connecticut Juvenile Training School
 The number of child abuse cases reported by DCF is down from 793 in 2009
to 481 in 2013

Data gathered from Bridgeport Police Department, Bridgeport Public Schools, CT judicial Department and
RYASAP/Center for Children’s Advocacy/Center for Children’s Law and Policy Disproportionate Minority
Contact Project in Bridgeport
BRIDGEPORT YOUTH
 40 Bridgeport youth at the CT Juvenile Training School (CJTS)
 500 Bridgeport youth per year at the Bridgeport Juvenile Detention
Center
 80% of youth at the CJTS and in Juvenile Detention are young people
of color
 All national anonymous studies of young people including RYASAP’s
2014 Bridgeport Student Survey show that white youth self-report
the same criminal behaviors as young people of color and some
crimes such as alcohol and drug use in higher numbers
Data gathered from Bridgeport Police Department, Bridgeport Public schools, CT judicial Department and
RYASAP/Center for Children’s Advocacy/Center for Children’s Law and Policy Disproportionate Minority
Contact Project in Bridgeport
BRIDGEPORT YOUTH
 50% reduction in school arrests since 2011 --- 119 arrests in 2011-12;
and 59 arrests in 2013-14.
 In 2013-14 there were 4,693 out of school suspensions and 4,212 in
school suspensions
 The three Bridgeport high schools – Central (1,110), Harding (506)
and Bassick (423) account for half of all out of school suspensions
 Black youth are twice as likely as Hispanic youth to be suspended
and arrested
Data gathered from Bridgeport Police Department, Bridgeport Public Schools, CT judicial
Department and RYASAP/Center for Children’s Advocacy/Center for Children’s Law and Policy
Disproportionate Minority Contact Project in Bridgeport
BRIDGEPORT YOUTH
 24% of Bridgeport youth report frequent depression and 23% have
attempted suicide
 25% have been in a group fight in the last year
 32% have used alcohol; 16% have used marijuana and 4% have used
heroin or other narcotics
 31% have been physically harmed by someone in their home
 33% have participated in 3 or more acts of fighting, hitting, injuring
a person, carrying or using a weapon or threatening physical harm
in the last 12 months
Data gathered from the RYASAP/Search Institute 2014 Student Survey
BRIDGEPORT YOUTH
 41% of Bridgeport youth report available youth programs as
opposed to 75% in Fairfield
 On the plus side, 65% of Bridgeport youth report strong family
support; 62% report positive peer influence; 62% are highly
motivated to succeed ins school; and 68% report a positive view of
their personal future
 Youth report very strong positive values --- Caring – 60%; Social
Justice – 67%; Integrity – 77%; Honesty – 73% and Responsibility
69%
Data gathered from the 2014 RYASAP/Search Institute Student Survey
Big Six and My Brothers Keeper Alignment
Strive
Together
“Big Six”
Shared
Outcomes
Middle Grade
Math
Proficiency
Kindergarten
Readiness
My
Brothers
Keeper
© 2014 StriveTogether
Early Grade
Reading
Proficiency
Post-secondary
Enrollment
Post-Secondary
Completion
High School
Graduation
All Youth
Remain Safe
from Violent
Crime
All Youth Out
of School are
Employed
89
Table Exercise
Small Group Discussion
• Are we OK to rally around the big six? If not, why?
• What additional outcomes should we consider?
© 2014 StriveTogether
90
StriveTogether “Big Six”
Outcomes
Kindergarten
Readiness
© 2014 StriveTogether
Early Grade
Reading
Middle Grade
Math
High School
Graduation
Post-secondary
Enrollment
Post-Secondary
Completion
91
LUNCH
92
Building Towards Action
Community Action
Networks
Contributing
Indicators
Core Indicators
Identified &
Prioritized
Outcomes
© 2014 StriveTogether
93
Continuous Improvement Case
Study
© 2014 StriveTogether
94
Pillar 3:
Collaborative
Action
The Partnership
commits to using
continuous
improvement to guide
the work.
95
What is different about
Continuous Improvement?
Continuous
Improvement
Reporting and
Accountability
- Using data to report
to funders and the
community
© 2014 StriveTogether
Evaluation and
Research
- Use data to
implement differently
- Use qualitative and
quantitative data to
assert value
“Learning fast to
implement well”
96
Continuous Improvement
Continuous improvement is an ongoing effort to improve services and supports
for children and families over time in order to improve a community level
outcome. These efforts can seek "incremental" improvement over time or
"breakthrough" improvement all at once.
Six Sigma / DMAIC
• Define: partners, problem, scope
etc. (Charter)
• Measure: set goals/measures based
on local data (Action Plan)
• Analyze: data collection / analysis
(action steps)
• Improve: test/pilot change; identify
improvements (action steps)
• Continuously improve/Control:
sustain / scale what works (action
steps)
Plan, Do, Check, Act (PDCA)
97
Continuous Improvement in Action. . .
Individually
Individual school teacher works with children
to set goals and test interventions to improve
learning in the classroom
Organizationally
Organizations (e.g. school districts or direct
service providers) practice continuous
improvement across their institution to
improve services and supports for children
and families
Collectively
Partners (e.g. Leadership Table or
Community Action Networks)
collectively track the impact of interventions
against shared outcomes to improve services
and supports for children and families
98
CASE STUDY EXAMPLE
99
Continuous improvement process for Community Action
Networks.
100
What we are tracking.
What we are prioritizing.
© 2014 StriveTogether
101
What indicator are we improving?
54% of graduates are
enrolling into college.
ACT Scores:
12.7
FAFSA
completion:
29 %
Free/Reduced
Lunch: 70 %
Graduation
Rate: 73 %
What are factors to consider?
© 2014 StriveTogether
102
54% of graduates are
enrolling into college.
ACT Scores:
12.7
FAFSA
completion:
29 %
Free/Reduced
Lunch: 70 %
Graduation
Rate: 73 %
This data makes the
FAFSA indicator
meaningful.
© 2014 StriveTogether
103
Where can we have the most impact?
SCHOOLS
FAFSA
School A
28%
87%
40%
School B
17%
24%
71%
School C
15%
85%
38%
School D
57%
86%
69%
AVERAGE
29%
71%
54%
© 2014 StriveTogether
FREE & REDUCED ENROLLMENT
104
Set Targets along the way.
Long-term: by 2018, increase
enrollment by 10 percentage points
College
Enrollment: 64%
Short-term: by 2015, increase FAFSA
completion by 21 percentage points
FAFSA
Completion: 50%
105
Where are the bright spots?
SCHOOLS
FAFSA
School A
28%
87%
40%
School B
17%
24%
71%
School C
15%
85%
38%
School D
57%
86%
69%
AVERAGE
29%
71%
54%
© 2014 StriveTogether
FREE & REDUCED ENROLLMENT
106
Analyze data to determine what worked.
Yes.
No.
Are there other
contributing factors
we can affect?
Are we missing
important players?
What can we refine to
have greater impact?
Are there other
strategies to consider?
How can we expand
our efforts?
Did we overlook
important data?
107
Continuous improvement process for Community Action
Networks.
108
Continuous Improvement Learnings
Early Childhood Networks (% of children K-ready):
• Improvements to early childhood education centers
• Intentional transitions: Home visitation to Quality ECE
• Understanding health factors/social emotional development
Leadership in Action
• Removing Community Action Network barriers
• Leadership “Charters” to focus on shared outcomes
• Leadership Challenges – Baseline Report Card Release
– 100 engagements in 100 days
© 2014 StriveTogether
109
Key Lessons
• Experts are on the front line
• Community level indicators are the “True North”
• Know your number!
• Don’t jump to action without data…
• But start with the data you have
© 2014 StriveTogether
110
• [email protected]
© 2014 StriveTogether
111
Landscape Analysis
© 2014 StriveTogether
112
Perform a landscape/asset analysis to
identify momentum/potential partners
Teacher/ Principal Quality
Great Start
Local College
Access Network
Common Core
B
K
3
Tutoring
Preschool
Quality
Campaign
©
2014 StriveTogether
© Strive
2012
8
12 13
15
Career
Mentoring Matters!
Youth Employment Coalition
Career Pathways
Partnership
113
Large Group Exercise
Landscape/Asset Analysis by Outcome
• Who in the community is already working in the
following spaces? Are their existing groups focused
in this area?
• Who is not at the table?
• Where do you see yourself and/or your organization
connecting to the outcomes?
© 2014 StriveTogether
114
Outcome Areas
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Family Skill-building; Parent/Guardian Readiness
Prenatal – 3 year old
Kindergarten Readiness
Early Grade Reading/Math
Middle Grade Reading/Math
HS Graduation
Career Readiness
PS Enrollment (degrees and cert./cred)
PS Completion (degrees and cert./cred.)
Social/Emotional Learning
Ensuring all youth remain safe from violent crime
Family/Civic Engagement and Leadership
Workforce and Jobs
© 2014 StriveTogether
115
Family Skill Building; Parent/Guardian
• Parent Leadership Training
Institute
Readiness
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Prenatal home visiting program
BCAC
PCAG
Family Resource Centers
Parent Center
Mercy Learning
Child Guidance Center
Caribe
Child First
Dept of Children and Families
Judy Carson
© 2014 StriveTogether
116
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Prenatal-3 year old
BAYC
St. Vincents Hospital (family health center)
Bridgeport Hospital
Remember People too
Office of Early Childhood (State)
McVee Child First
VIP Child Program
IMA
Family Resource Centers
SNAP
Kennedy Center
Providers of Early Care
© 2014 StriveTogether
117
Kindergarten Readiness
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BAYC
Family Resource Centers
Parent Center
Providers
ABCD
Head Start
School Readiness
Home Advisory Committee
Council of Churches/IMA
CES
Catholic Charities
Daycare Centers
© 2014 StriveTogether
118
• Rotary Club of Bridgeport
• Public Libraries
• Boys & Girls Club
• Project Learn
• Caribe
• IMA
• School Volunteer Association
• Youth Centers
• CES
• Lighthouse Programs
• Local colleges/universities
• Educators / Bridgeport Public Schools
• Talent Search
• PTA or PAC
• StriveTogether
Therapeutic Programs
© 2014
Early Grade Reading/Math
119
• Rotary Club of Bridgeport
• Public Libraries
• Boys & Girls Club
• Project Learn
• Caribe
• IMA
• School Volunteer Association
• Youth Centers
• CES
• Lighthouse Programs
• Local colleges/universities
• Educators / Bridgeport Public Schools
• Talent Search
• PTA or PAC
• StriveTogether
Therapeutic Programs
© 2014
Middle Grade Reading/Math
120
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
High School Graduation
Business Community
Middle Grade lists
Build on
Bridgeport Public Fund
College Access Programs
RYASAP
Workplace
Bridgeport Higher Educational Alliance
Trade Unions
Dept of Probation
Military recruiters
Gear Up
Vocational/technical schools
© 2014 StriveTogether
121
Career Readiness
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
St Vincents College
College Universities
Career resources & the workplace
Build On
Americorps
Business Community
Labor Dept
WIBO
International Institute
Internships
Entrepreneurial devp groups
Bridgeport Works
© 2014 StriveTogether
122
Post-Secondary (degrees and
credentials) Enrollment
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Same as last
Civil Service Dept
Strive
IRS VITA Clinics
Recovery Community
FAFSA providers
Behaviorial Health
Online degree programs
VIP Program
© 2014 StriveTogether
123
Post-Secondary (degrees and
credentials) Completion
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
List before
Career Readiness Slide
Persistent Supports within colleges/universities
CAAB (active table)
Alumni Associations
Thrive by 25
Student Support Services
© 2014 StriveTogether
124
Ensuring all youth remain safe from
violent crime
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
RASAP
Community policing
After School programs
Churches
Project Longevity
Employers
YMCA
Youth Employment programs
Office of Neighborhood Revitia
Center of Family Justice
CT Against Violence
All faiths
© 2014 StriveTogether
125
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Family/Civic Engagement and
Leadership
Media
Bridgeport Parent Leadership Initiative
Build On
Political Leaders
Leadership greater Bridgeport
NRZs
BCAC
© 2014 StriveTogether
126
Social/Emotional Learning
• Colleges/universities
• NEHEMIAH Commission
• Faith based orgs
• Child First Program
• MIECHV
• Parents as teachers programs
• Pediatritiions
• CES
• NYO
• Child Study Program
• PBIS (George Sugai)
Nurturing Families
© 2014•StriveTogether
127
Workforce and Jobs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Colleges/universities
Workplace
Career readiness slide
Strive
Employers
Chambers
WIB
City of Bridgeport
Career Resources
Deb Caviness
© 2014 StriveTogether
128
CORE VALUES AND GUIDING
PRINCIPLES
129
© 2014 StriveTogether
130
Core Values
• A collective vision around education and learning is key to community
prosperity;
• Education is required to participate in a democratic society;
• The systems in our community that perpetuate inequities must be
dismantled and reconstructed to prepare all children for success;
• Accountability and metrics are critical to measuring success; and
• Inclusion of those that have been marginalized builds stronger
communities.
© 2014 StriveTogether
131
What the Community Has Said About
Developing Core Values and Guiding
Principles
• This is very important and should be done soon and in writing.
• Should reflect the commitment to full and open engagement.
There should be a strong commitment to bringing new people in
and not falling back to only the same faces.
• A commitment to transparency is essential.
• A commitment to working through differences/disagreements
instead of “picking up your toys and going home”. This is too
frequent and a poor model for young people. It undermines
progress.
• We need to commit to honoring the process.
• Highlight the point that this work is about kids not individual
hidden agendas, grudges or certain points of view. “Can we put
our egos aside?”
Continued…
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
We should value honesty and authenticity.
We need to commit to ensuring access to information.
We need to value the full diversity of the community.
A commitment to social justice and equity is essential.
A commitment needs to be made to the greater good.
If we fail, we fail forward!
Must promote a spirit of optimism and pride. We want
all people and especially young people to be proud of
Bridgeport.
• Inclusion, inclusion, inclusion.
• Civility and respect in the room.
Continued…
• A commitment to all voices being heard.
• A commitment to young people being engaged as
partners in the solution.
• Shared decision making is essential for folks to have
buy in and feel empowered.
• We need to commit to celebrating successes.
• Value all children, parents and educators.
• No tolerance for divisiveness, but room for healthy
disagreement.
• We must commit to being adaptable, agile and
improvement oriented. Everything will not be perfect,
but that is not a reason to give up!
Large Group Discussion
How does the Fresno example resonate with you?
The input so far?
What else needs to be in Bridgeport’s core values and
guiding principles?
What is missing?
© 2014 StriveTogether
135
Investment & Sustainability
© 2014 StriveTogether
136
Pillar 4:
Investment &
Sustainability
An anchor entity is established and capacity to
support the daily management of the partnership is
in place.
The Partnership engages funders to support the
operations and collaborative work of partners to
improve outcomes.
137
Key Lessons
• Aligning funders and aligning providers
• Engaging for engagement’s sake
• Backbone or go home
© 2014 StriveTogether
138
Backbone Function Roles
Fiscal Agent
Provide limited financial and legal oversight
like overseeing grants and budgeting for
the partnership. The fiscal agent typically
needs to be a 501(c)3 organization to
receive tax-free donations, including grants.
Staffing
Support the salaries of new employees or loan
existing employees to staff the partnership.
Employees of the partnership, whose time is not
donated as in-kind support, are often supported by
the fiscal agent.
The key partnership staff positions are:
House the Partnership
Provide office and meeting space as well as
technology needs for partnership staff.
This is typically the mailing address of
the partnership and recognized as the
partnership’s main location.
• Partnership Director- A full-time dedicated staff
person that provides leadership and management
to ensure the mission and values of the
partnership are put into practice
• Facilitator- Supports continuous
improvement action planning
• Data Manager- Supports analysis,
management, integration, and reporting of
data
• Communication/Community Engagement
Manager- Supports internal and external
communications and engagement of the
broader community
5.
© StriveTogether 2014
139
Backbone Function Roles
Engage Partners &
Community
Fundraising &
Development
Bring together the necessary community partners
to support the work, including engagement of
the broader community as well as executive-level
individuals for the leadership table.
Develop and implement a plan for
securing funding and resources to advance
the partnership’s work. Tap into existing
relationships to build financial support for
the partnership.
Communications
Data Support
Develop a set of key messages about the partnership
and communicate them regularly to internal
partners and the broad community. Establish the
necessary mechanisms for communicating about the
partnership (newsletter, website, etc.). Release an
annual report card to the community that effectively
communicates the importance and meaning of the
data for each of the partnership’s community-level
outcomes. Enable the flow of information between
the different groups within the partnership.
Enable the access, analysis, and utilization
of data to support the partnership.
• Data Access- enables necessary data
that is crucial to advancing the work of
the partnership to be accessed and used
for data-driven decision making.
• Data Analysis- analyzes data according to
the partnership’s needs.
• Data Coaching- trains and supports
partnership and network members in
the process of using data for
continuous
© StriveTogether 2014
improvement.
6.
140
Community Engagement Continuum
141
Examples of Action
Partnership Development
Type of Action
Individual
Organization
Collective
© 2014 StriveTogether
Early Stage
Middle Stage
Late Stage
Speak to the work of the
partnership regularly in
the community at events
or on a board
Advocate for collection
and utilization of data on
a non-profit board of use
of data to inform decision
on the board of a
philanthropy
Work to get on the board
of key orgs /partners or
speak to groups that are
struggling to find ways to
engage
Adopt partnership
outcomes as a part of
strategic plan and ensure
staff understand
connection to overall
vision
Provide programmatic
data on work related to
a partnership outcome
to enable continuous
improvement
Change work of
organization –
practitioner, investor,
policymaker – to adopt or
support practices
identified as impactful
Leverage partner
resources to align and
support development of
partnership structure
Champion mobilization
campaign to engage and
tap into community
resources to support
outcome improvement
Develop and champion a
policy and advocacy
agenda to remove
barriers and spread best
practices identified by
partnership
142
Action Commitments
Clear commitments to take tangible action within a specified timeframe
“What can we do collectively as the leadership
table to drive systems change by supporting
evidence based practice, mobilizing the
community and championing advocacy?”
“What can my organization do to align our
work to the partnership outcomes, use data
differently and identify best practices?”
“What can I do individually in the multiple roles
I play in the community to build awareness and
alignment with the partnership?”
© 2014 StriveTogether
143
NEXT STEPS AND WRAP UP
144
Next Steps
When
What
December
Design Institute Follow-Up (notes, slides,
survey)
Develop 180 Day Action Plan
Additional Community Sessions
January
Core Leadership Team and community
approval of vision, mission, outcomes
and structure
March
Baseline data collection
Host Youth Summit
April
Prioritization of outcomes and related
indicators
Spring 2015
Baseline report release
Ongoing Community Sessions
Late Summer 2015
Prioritize outcomes and begin Launch of
initial CANS
© 2014 StriveTogether
145
Action Commitments
© 2014 StriveTogether
146
Final Remarks!
© 2014 StriveTogether
147
Thank You for Joining Today!
© 2014 StriveTogether
148

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