moriarty_app9_inppt_14

Report
Part 4
Practice: Where are Media Headed?
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What is a media plan and what is the role of
media research in developing media plans?
What are the four steps in media planning
and why are they important?
How do IMC and global marketing affect
media plans?
What are the responsibilities of media
buyers?
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Traditionally, advertising agencies have developed
media plans.
Lately, media buying companies have assumed
planning roles.
Some agencies have spun off media function as
separate companies.
Specialized “new media” agencies have emerged.
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(Figure 14.1 visual here)
Media planners look for data from creative, marketing, and media
sources.
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Media research is central to media planning.
Information sources include:
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Client information: about customers, past efforts,
sales, budget.
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Market research: about markets and product
categories.
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Competitive advertising: share of voice is a
percentage of total advertising spending by one
brand in a product category.
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Media kits: the size and
makeup of various media
audiences. Supplied by
companies Nielsen, Arbitron,
ABC, Simmons.
Media Coverage Area:
designated marketing area
(DMA) is used in TV media.
Consumer Information: used
to locate target audiences
within media markets.
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The media plan is a written document
summarizing the objectives and strategies
pertinent for placing a company’s brand
messages.
The goal is to find the most efficient and effective
ways to deliver messages to a targeted audience.
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Identifying the target audience is a key decision.
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The idea is to select media vehicles that:
◦ are compatible with the creative executions
◦ whose audiences best match those of the brand’s target
audience.
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Every media vehicle’s audience is different and
therefore varies regarding what percent of its
audience is in the brand’s target audience.
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Media objectives describe what a company wants to
accomplish regarding the delivery of its brand
messages and their impact on the target audience.
The reach objective
 Reach is the percent of different people exposed to
the message.
 Targeted reach is the percentage of a vehicle’s
audience that matches the brand’s target market.
 Wasted reach is the number of people in the vehicle’s
audience who are neither customers nor prospects.
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Writing media objectives
 Objectives must be measureable with time frames.
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You can seldom reach 100 percent of your target
audience.
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At times, frequency is more important than reach.
As a class:
Review the examples of typical media objectives
found in this chapter.
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This involves decisions and tools that help identify
the best way to deliver the brand message.
Regardless of the budget, the goal is to reach the
right people at the right time with the right
message.
Media strategy is the way media planners
determine the most cost-effective way to reach the
target audience and satisfy media objectives.
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Strategies that deliver reach and
frequency
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If the objectives specify high reach,
strategies would involve creating
broad exposure across many media
vehicles.
If the objectives specify high
frequency, strategies will focus on a
more limited list of media vehicles.
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Media mix selection
 Most brands use a variety of targeted media vehicles,
called a media mix, to reach current and potential
customers.
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Using a media mix distributes the message more
widely; media have different audience profiles.
Ask yourself:
◦ What media will deliver what effects?
◦ Can I reinforce and extend those effects with a mix of media?
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This ad demonstrates
the use of a creative
print ad to drive traffic
to a website.
See the “Practical Tips”
box in this chapter for
more guidance on
when to use various
media.
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Geographical strategies
 A heavy up schedule is advised in DMAs where the
product is available or projected sales are higher.
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A category development index (CDI) determines
rates of consumption for a product category.
Brand development index (BDI) determines the
strength of the brand in geographical areas.
The CDI tells you where the category is strong and
weak, and the BDI tells you where your brand is
strong and weak.
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Scheduling strategies
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Aperture refers to when consumers are most receptive to a
brand message.
The goal is to reach the right people at the right time with the
right message.
This billboard illustrates a message delivered at the right time
and the right place.
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Timing strategies: When to advertise?
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Duration: How long?
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Continuity: How often?
◦ Seasonality, holidays, days of the week, time of day.
◦ Lead time: time between thinking about purchase and
purchasing.
◦ If the period is too short, the message may not have
sufficient impact.
◦ If the period is too long, the ads may suffer from wearout.
◦ Refers to how advertising is spread out over the campaign.
◦ A continuous strategy spreads ads evenly over a campaign
period.
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Pulsing strategy
Advertising is intensified (peaks) before an aperture
and reduced to lower levels (valleys) until the
aperture reopens; bursts of activity.
Flighting strategy
Alternating periods of intense advertising activity
(bursts) and no advertising (hiatus).
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Size and position strategies
◦ Based on advertising objectives.
◦ Correct message size and length must be determined for
each medium.
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Media weighting
◦ How much to budget in each DMA or region and for each
target group.
◦ Used with seasonality, geography, audience segments, or
level of brand development by DMA
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Media plans are driven by accountability.
“Media departments are no place for guessing. With millions –
even tens of millions – of dollars at stake, clients want hard
data showing what their budgets are being well spent.”
-- A MediaBank executive
As a class:
Analyze this quote. How does it impact the media planner’s
responsibilities?
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GRPs (gross rating points) are found by
multiplying each media vehicle’s rating
by the number of insertions, then
adding up the total of all vehicles.
TRPs (targeted rating points) adjusts the
GRP calculation so it more accurately
reflects the percentage of the target
audience watching the program, thus
reducing waste coverage.
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Advertising decisions often
come down to cold, hard
cash.
Planners use CPM, TCPM, and
CPP to measure a target
audience’s size against the
cost of reaching that
audience.
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CPM: Cost per thousand
◦ An estimate of the cost to expose 1,000 audience members.
◦ CPM = cost of ad x 1,000/readership.
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TCPM: Targeted cost per thousand
◦ An estimate of the cost to expose 1,000 target audience
members
◦ TCPM = cost of ad x 1,000/readers in target audience
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CPP: Cost per point
◦ Comparing media vehicles by relating the cost of the
message to the audience rating.
◦ CPP = cost of ad/program or issue rating
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Media Optimization
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Media planners must be careful not to overload and
irritate consumers.
A computer technique that enables marketers to
determine the relative impact of a media mix on
product sales, and to optimize efficiency.
As a class:
Review: “A Matter of Principle: When is Too Many Too Much?”
Discuss:
What is the consumer “tipping point”?
Why is this a potential problem?
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Media plans do not have a universal form.
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However, there is a common an logical pattern to the
decision stages.
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To see how a real-world media plan is written, see
Figure 14.6 in this chapter:
“Women’s Health Services Media Plan”
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Which key Chapter 14 concepts do you see repeated
throughout this plan?
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“Women’s Health Services Media Plan”
Major sections:
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Objectives
Strategic plan development
Key media strategies
As a class:
Identify each of these sections in the plan and give
specific examples of each one.
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IMC planners consider message delivery systems,
including all media used in various types of
marketing communication.
IMC media plans also focus on key contact points.
This includes:
◦ A variety of experiential media
◦ Conventional media
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Dentsu’s ContactPoint Management
This Tokyo-based agency focuses on two strategies
critical to effective integrated communication:
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Identify the emotion-driving points where consumers come in
contact with a brand.
Move away from the traditional B2C model towards a B2C2C
model. Here, a business talks to consumers, who talk to other
consumers.
For an example of how Dentsu manages brand contact points for
an automotive campaign, see Chapter 14.
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Cross –media integration
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Here, various media work together to create coherent
brand communication; synergy between different
media messages.
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In traditional media, this is referred to as image
transfer — how radio reinforces TV messages.
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Go to http://thinkagain.theatlantic.com
to see an example of cross-media integration.
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The Atlantic Monthly magazine used a multiplatform campaign
that integrated messages from neon signs to create an event
that was filmed for videos that were seen on a website.
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There is no truly global medium.
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Global media plans must draw upon a variety of
media tools go gain worldwide coverage.
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An advertiser seeking global exposure must deal with
different networks and different vehicles in different
countries.
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Media buying is a complicated process.
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The American Association of Advertising Agencies
lists 21 elements of a media buy.
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The most important one is matching the media
vehicle to the strategic needs of the message and the
brand.
Let’s examine some of these key buyer activities…
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Key media buyer activities:
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Provide inside information to media planners
Select media vehicles
Negotiate and contract for time and space
Bargain for preferred positions
Demand extra support/value-added media services
Monitor media performance during, after campaign
Post-campaign evaluation
Monitor billing and payment
Ensure “make goods”
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Multichannel buying (and selling)
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A range of services can be used to ease the task of
multichannel media buying.
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Newspaper buying is simplified through companies
that place advertising in papers nationwide.
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In the digital world, DoubleClick’s DART for
Advertisers (DART) service helps manage display.
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A cross-media buy can be simplified by media
companies that manage multiple vehicles.
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Global media buying
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Few marketers are doing it.
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Europe features buying “centrals;” media organizations
that buy across several European nations.
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Media buyers must always consider the cultural
implications in media use.
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Some media buying companies are adept at working
with specific cultures.
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The media landscape is dynamic and changing fast.
It is hard to keep track of how the media business is
practiced.
Unbundling Media Planning and Buying
 Agencies’ media departments have become separate,
independent profit centers and can work for the
agencies’ competition, and compete with agencies
for planning.
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Some media companies offer consolidated services,
bringing some of the planning and buying functions
back together.
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Online Media Buying
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New Forms of Media Research
◦ Google and Yahoo! Are making inroads into media buying
and selling.
◦ Agencies are trying to figure out whether they are friends or
enemies.
◦ Online media research (hits and clicks) don’t measure impact.
◦ Traditional media monitoring systems don’t address the new
ways media is used and systems like TiVo and interactive TV.
◦ Viral media is equally difficult to measure.
◦ Most media research measures independent media, not the
effectiveness of combined media.
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In Part 5, we will:
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Review specific areas of marketing
communication including public relations, direct
response, sales promotion and sponsorships.
Apply these to specific situations including retail,
B2B, nonprofit, and international marketing.
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“Beauty of a Campaign”
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Dove’s “Campaign for Real Beauty” challenges the
audience to reconsider how they define beauty, and to
love their bodies.
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The campaign radically changed the Dove brand
image with a culturally relevant message.
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The campaign resulted in a 24% sales increase during
the advertising period.
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“Beauty of a Campaign”
Key lessons:
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Effective advertising means being sensitive to
consumers; understanding how they think, act, feel.
It also means knowing where consumers will be able
to connect with a brand message.
As a class: What others can you think of?
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