Generate & Test Hypotheses

Report
Design Question 4
Departments of Teaching & Learning and Instructional Excellence & Equity
Learning Goal
The participant will be able to
describe instructional
strategies that engage students
in cognitively complex tasks
involving generating and
testing hypotheses.
LEARNING IS MESSY!
During the process, students will go through
different stages of emotions. They might feel
uncertainty as they begin, optimism when they
select a project, then confusion or frustration when
they’ve gathered a lot of information and don’t know
where to go with it. As they begin to sift through the
information, they gain a sense of clarity and
direction and begin formulating and executing the
project. By the end of the process, they’ll have a
sense of satisfaction or disappointment on the
outcome of their presentation.
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/03/5-tools-to-help-students-learn-how-to-learn/
21. Organizing Students for Cognitively
Complex Tasks
The teacher organizes the class in such a way as to facilitate
students working on complex tasks that require them to generate
and test hypotheses.
Teacher Evidence
 Teacher establishes the need to generate and test hypotheses
 Teacher organizes students into groups to generate and test hypotheses
Student Evidence
 When asked, students describe the importance of generating and testing
hypotheses about content
 When asked, students explain how groups support their learning
 Students use group activities to help them generate and test hypotheses
1. Skim through the strategies
outlined on pages 134-136.
2. Think-Pair-Share. Which of these
strategies have you used in your
classroom? How do they look?
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively
Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis
Generation and Testing
The teacher engages students in complex tasks (e.g. decision
making, problem solving, experimental inquiry, investigation) that
require them to generate and test hypotheses.
Teacher Evidence
 Teacher engages students with an explicit decision making, problem
solving, experimental inquiry, or investigation task that requires them to
generate and test hypotheses
 Teacher facilitates students generating their own individual or group task
that requires them to generate and test hypotheses
Rating Scale
Highly
Highly
Effective ++
Effective
Adapts and
creates new
strategies
for unique
student
needs and
situations in
order for the
desired
effect to be
evident in all
students.
ALL
Students
Engages
students in
cognitively
complex tasks
and monitors
for evidence of
the extent to
which the
majority of the
students are
generating and
testing
hypotheses.
Effective
Developing
/Needs
Unsatisfactory
Improvement
Engages
students in
cognitively
complex
tasks, but the
majority of
students are
not monitored
for the
desired effect
of the
strategy.
Uses strategy Strategy was
incorrectly or called for but
with parts
not exhibited.
missing.
Ask & Get - Indicator 22
“students do”
“teacher does”
PLAN IT!
The teacher PLANS
engaging, cognitively
complex tasks that
asks students to
generate and test
hypotheses.
Instructional Excellence & Equity
ASK IT!
GET IT!
Students can
GENERATE
hypotheses
ASK
Question
Ro Educational Leadership, Inc.
Task
Students can
TEST
hypotheses
The teacher
“monitors” the
QUANTITY and
the QUALITY of
the “get.”
22. Engaging Students in Cognitively
Complex Tasks Involving Hypothesis
Generation and Testing CONTINUED
The teacher engages students in complex tasks (e.g. decision
making, problem solving, experimental inquiry, investigation) that
require them to generate and test hypotheses.
Student Evidence
 Students are clearly working on tasks that require them to generate and
test hypotheses
 When asked, students can explain the hypothesis they are testing
 When asked, students can explain whether their hypothesis was confirmed
or disconfirmed
 Student artifacts indicate that they can engage in decision making,
problem solving, experimental inquiry, or investigation
Decision
Making
Investigation
Problem
Solving
Generate & Test
Hypotheses
Experimental
Inquiry
System
Analysis
Invention
Decision Making
Departments of Teaching & Learning and Instructional Excellence & Equity
Decision Making
• Identify Alternatives & Make a Prediction
• Determine Criteria on which Alternatives
will be Judged.
• Complete the Decision Making Task
• Determine Best Alternative
• Contrast Findings with Original Predictions
& Support Conclusions
Decision Matrix
Criteria
A
B
C
TOTAL
Alternatives
Choice 1 Choice 2 Choice 3
Quantitative Decision Matrix
Criteria
A
Alternatives
Choice 1 Choice 2 Choice 3
3 × ___ =
3 × ___ =
3 × ___ =
2 × ___ =
2 × ___ =
2 × ___ =
1 × ___ =
1 × ___ =
1 × ___ =
Weighted x3
B
Weighted x2
C
Weighted x1
TOTAL
You get to update your kitchen floor.
What will you choose?
Use the Decision Making template as a
framework for the task.
1. List the alternatives for consideration. (Types of
flooring)
2. Select and list the criteria to evaluate the
alternatives. (Considerations for making the
flooring selection)
3. List what you predict will be the best alternative.
4. Determine the information you would need to
complete the decision making task.
Next steps for completion of decision:
1. List which alternative is best based on the
criteria.
2. Do the results match with the original prediction?
3. If not , how should your thinking change?
Problem Solving
Departments of Teaching & Learning and Instructional Excellence & Equity
Problem Solving
Determine
the Goal
Identify
New
Context or
Constraint
Predict
Impact to
Results
Test the
Prediction
Report
Results
with
Constructed
Supports
TED
Ideas worth
Spreading
Dan Meyer taught high school
math for six years, studies math
education at Stanford, and
speaks internationally. He was
named one of Tech& Learning’s
30 Leaders of the Future. He
lives in Mountain View, CA.
http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_meyer_math_curriculum_makeover.html
Volusia County, FL
https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/grade-1-math
Experimental
Inquiry
Departments of Teaching & Learning and Instructional Excellence & Equity
Experimental Inquiry
Make a prediction based on observations.
Design an experiment to test the predictions.
Examine the results in light of the original prediction.
Explain the results and your conclusions.
1. Read closely the assigned inquiry task card.
2. Make and record on a post-it note a prediction about
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
how your colleagues would feel about the idea
presented on the task card.
Generate an interview question.
Form inside/outside circle based on your task group
letter assignment when directed.
Interview your face partner. (Record notes if desired.)
Circles will rotate according to directions.
Repeat the interview process.
Return to table and compare interview results with
original prediction.
Discuss with table partners, the outcomes and
implications from the experimental inquiry.
Modeling Experimental Inquiry
for young students
1. What do I see or notice?
2. How can I explain it?
3. Based on my explanation, what can I predict
(hypothesize)?
4. How can I test my prediction (hypothesis)?
5. What happened? Was my prediction (hypothesis)
confirmed? What new questions do I have?
Modeling Experimental Inquiry
for older students
1. Observe something that interests you and describe
2.
3.
4.
5.
what has occurred.
Explain what you have observed. What theories or
rules could explain what you have observed?
Based on your explanation make a hypothesis.
Design an experiment or activity to test your
hypothesis.
Examine results and determine if evidence
supports your hypothesis. What new questions do
you have?
Investigation
Departments of Teaching & Learning and Instructional Excellence & Equity
Investigation
Historical
Investigations
• Answering
questions
about what
really
happened.
• Why did “x”
happen?
Projective
Investigations
• What would
happen if…?
Definitional
Investigations
• What are the
important
features of…?
• What are the
defining
characteristics
of…?
23. Providing Students with Resources
and Guidance
The teacher acts as resource provider and guide as students
engage in cognitively complex tasks
Teacher Evidence
 Teacher makes himself/herself available to students who need guidance or
resources
•
Circulates around the room
•
Provides easy access to himself/herself
 Teacher interacts with students during the class to determine their needs
for hypothesis generation and testing tasks
 Teacher volunteers resources and guidance as needed by the entire class,
groups of students, or individual students
23. Providing Students with Resources
and Guidance continued
The teacher acts as resource provider and guide as students
engage in cognitively complex tasks
Student Evidence
 Students seek out the teacher for advice and guidance regarding
hypothesis generation and testing tasks
 When asked, students can explain how the teacher provides assistance and
guidance in hypothesis generation and testing tasks
1. Skim through the strategies outlined
on pages 140-141.
2. Think-Pair-Share. What changes in
your classroom practice will you make
to provide guidance and support of
students in Design Question 4?
SCPS Instructional Model & Evaluation Webpage
From the DEPARTMENTS Tab, Choose: Instructional Model & Evaluation

similar documents