PowerPoint Day 2 - Utah Education Network

Report
LEVEL 2
CRAFT & STRUCTURE
As you enter today,
please hang your Level 1
questions under the
“Level 1” sign in the hall.
HEARTS AND WISHES
• 3 Hearts are things you will take back, or
that you found helpful.
• A Wish is something you need more
information on or we did not cover.
Something you WISH you knew more
about from today (please don’t comment
on things like temperature etc.).
REVIEW LEVEL 1
• Gallery walk of Level 1 Each Kindness Questions
• Questions?
• Thoughts?
TEA PARTY
1. Read your piece of
the text from the Close
Reading Article from
yeterday.
2. Find three people you
don’t know and discuss
what the text means to
you and listen to their
ideas as well.
TEXT COMPLEXITY
•
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Appendix A - pages 3-17
EXPERT STRATEGY
• You will be assigned a number.
• All the ones will be together at one spot in the room,
twos, threes (etc).
• Read your assigned section of your article in Appendix A
about Text Complexity.
• Discuss this section with your group, make notes, you will
be the expert and teach others about this section.
• After about 5 minutes you will then mix. There will be one
of each number at a table. Each expert will teach the
others in the group about their section.
• We will then share out as a group about what we have
learned.
THIS IS HOW I FEEL WHEN I TEACH
TEXT COMPLEXITY. . . .
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdxEAt91D7k
THE CRISIS
• Complexity of texts ≠ college and career readiness:
• High school textbooks have declined in all subject areas over
several decades
• Average length of sentences in K-8 textbooks has declined
from 20 to 14 words
• Vocabulary demands have declined, e.g., 8th grade
textbooks = former 5th grade texts; 12th grade anthologies =
former 7th grade texts
• Complexity of college and careers texts has
remained steady or increased, resulting in a huge
gap (350L+)
LEXILE
CREATING A LEXILE LEVEL
• 125 word slice
• Sentence length
• Difficulty of vocabulary
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr0jQzrDafw
Grade Band
Old Lexile Ranges
K-1
100-500
100-500
2-3
450-725
450-790
4-5
645-845
770-980
6-8
860-1010
955-1155
9-10
960-1115
1080-1305
11-12
1070-1220
1215-1355
LEXILE RANGES AND
New Aligned
GRADE BANDS
Ranges
Caveat: Not valid for drama or poetry…it’s an
algorithm, and therefore, fallible.
Definition of text complexity
1. Quantitative measures – readability
and other scores of text complexity
often best measured by a computer.
2. Qualitative measures – levels of
meaning, structure, language
conventionality and clarity, and
knowledge demands often best
measured by an attentive human.
3. Reader and Task considerations –
background knowledge of reader,
motivation, interests, and complexity
generated by tasks assigned often
best made by educators employing
their professional judgment.
Reader and
Task
QUANTITATIVE
Text Complexity
Grade Bands
Suggested
Lexile Range
K-1
100L – 500L*
2-3
450L – 790L
4-5
770L – 980L
6-8
955L – 1155L
9-10
1080L – 1305L
11-CCR
1215L – 1355L
Lexile Analyzer
www.lexile.com/findabook/
WARNING!
1000L
Lexile Measure
224
Pages
Fiction & ...
Humor & ...
Juvenile
Categories
QUALITATIVE
The rubric for literature and the rubric for
informational text allow educators to evaluate the
important elements of text that are often missed by
computer software that tend to focus on more
easily measured factors.
The educator is critical here.
• Levels of Purpose What will the reader gain
from reading this text?
• Structure How is the text designed to support
the reader in accessing the purpose?
• Language Conventionality and Clarity How
does language effect accessibility?
• Knowledge Demands What does the student
need to know to access the text?
LEVELS OF MEANING OR PURPOSE:
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Quantitative Measurement Lexile: 610L
Qualitative Measurement: Hemingway
uses images and word choice to
convey emotions rather than describing
it; the words often have multiple
connotative meanings; the story
contains multiple complex and mature
themes.
Adjusted text complexity value: 11.5+
STRUCTURE:
*Holes, by Louis Sachar
Quantitative Measurement: 660L
Qualitative Measurement:
Structure: Story continuously jumps back
and forth between three different time
periods, settings, and character groups.
Adjusted text complexity value: 5.9 – 7.5 f
KNOWLEDGE DEMANDS
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
Quantitative Measurement: 680L
Qualitative Measurement:
Sophisticated themes. The experiences and
perspective conveyed will likely be different
from many of our students. Knowledge of the
Great Depression, the “Okie Migration” to
California, and the religion and music of the
migrants would be helpful.
Adjusted text complexity value: 9-10
READER AND TASKS
The questions provided in this
resource are meant to spur teacher
thought and reflection upon the
text, students, and any tasks
associated with the text.
Thinking Skills
Reading Skills
Motivation and
Engagement
Prior Knowledge and
Experience
Content or Theme
Concerns
THE PROCESS
1. Determine the quantitative
measures of the text.
2. Analyze the qualitative
measures of the text.
3. Reflect upon the reader and
task considerations.
4. Recommend placement in the
appropriate text complexity
band.
Reader and Task
TEXT COMPLEXITY RUBRIC
RUBRIC ACTIVITY USING “THE OTHER
SIDE” , THE LEXILE ANALYZER ALONG
WITH...”THE AMAZING TOOL”
www.lexile.com/findabook/
IMPORTANT DISCOVERIES
• The text complexity analysis process gives us a
method for becoming more purposeful in text
selection.
• The process helps us at all grade levels to be
confident in our content knowledge and ability to
read and analyze a text before we teach it.
• The process encourages us to engage in
meaningful discussions about text with colleagues.
IN THE END…
“The use of qualitative and quantitative
measures to assess text complexity is
balanced in the Standards’ model by the
expectation that educators will employ
professional judgment to match texts to
particular students and tasks.”
Appendix A
DO YOU GET IT NOW?
LOOKING AT LEVEL 2
CRAFT & STRUCTURE
AS TEACHERS DO WE FEEL LIKE THIS WHEN WE ARE
TOLD WE HAVE ANOTHER THING TO TEACH?
TEXT FEATURES
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Page 15 - RI2.5
Page 16 - RI3.5
We can teach language arts in collaboration with
other subjects. TEXT FEATURES are one of those skills
easily taught during other subjects.
WHY ARE TEXT FEATURES
IMPORTANT?
• Text Features help us to identify the big ideas and
topics that the author is focusing on.
• Authors use text features to bring attention to
important details.
• Visual text features such as maps and charts help to
support the information the author presents in the
text.
• Text features make the text more accessible to the
reader and often provide additional information to
help students comprehend the content.
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
LEVEL 2
CRAFT & STRUCTURE
LEVEL 2 TEXT FEATURES
TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTIONS
Paula the Predictor
What key facts do the text features of the text help us
to understand?
USOE EARTH & MOON BOOK
This book was created by Davis School
District using the text from UEN
http://www.uen.org/core/science/scibe
r/TRB3/index.shtml
Teacher plan ahead copy
Student copy
TEXT FEATURES CONTINUED
Work in partners to do a review game with worksheet.
• Number different text features
• Teacher defines a text feature
• Partners:
• A. Think (think of the answer)
• B. Share (show the numbered answer on their fingers)
• C. Show (teams show the class the answers they came up with)
TEXT STRUCTURE
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Pg 13 – RL2.3 & 2.5, Pg 14 – RL3.3 & 3.5
Pg 15 – RI2.3, Pg 16 – RI3.3
This is also a part of the overall strand Craft and Structure.
VALUE OF TEACHING TEXT STRUCTURE
When we use and teach the same text
structures repeatedly, students can
“save the template in their brain,” so it
can be recalled later, or students can
organize ideas on their own.
Ray Reutzel, DSD training 12/9/10
TEXT STRUCTURE CONTINUED
“If students are reading to answer their
own questions (they do this while filling in
a graphic organizer), their comprehension
increases by 50%.”
Ray Reutzel, DSD training, 12-9-10
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
STRUCTURES
A DAPTED FROM A POWER POINT PRESENTATION CREA TED
BY BEV NETTO
Narrative
(Literature)
• Prevalent in oral
stories, novels,
movies, drama
• Based on familiar
world knowledge
• Follows a structure
more aligned with
oral language
Expository
(Informational Text)
• Prevalent in
magazines, manuals,
encyclopedias,
poetry, newspapers,
etc.
• Unfamiliar or abstract
content
• Uses many
organizational
structures
ORGANIZATIONAL
PATTERNS
“Read” the texts below.
• Which is a narrative (literature)?
• Which is expository (informational text)?
• How can you tell?
XXXXXXX xx XXXXXX
I. Xxxxx
Initially, xxxx xxxxxx xxxxxx xxxx xxxx xxx xxxx xxxxxxx xxx xx xxxx.
Xxxxx xx xxxx xxxx xxxxx xxxxxx xxx. Xxxx, xxxxx, xxxx xxxxxx.
II. Xxxx Xxxxx
Xxxx, xxxx, xxx, xx:
• Xxxx
• Xxxxxxx xxx
XXXXXXX xx XXXXXX
As she lingered xxx xxxx xxxxxx xxxxx xxxx xxxxxx. Xxxx, xxxxx xxxx
xxxx! Xxxx xxxx xxxx. Xxxx! Xxxx! Xxxxxxx xxxx xxxx, xxxx xxxx xxxxx
xxxx xxxx.
Xxxx xxxx, “Xxxxxx xxxxx. Xxxx xxxx xxxxxxx xxx xx xxxxxxx xxxx?”
Cochran and Hain,
WHAT IS TEXT STRUCTURE?
Text structure refers to the
organization of ideas in a text.
As authors write a text to
communicate an idea, they will
use a structure that goes along
with the idea (Meyer 1985).
Literature
Text Structure
Informational
Text Structures
• Narrative or
Story Structure
• Time Order
Sequence
• Description
• Listing
• Compare and
Contrast
• Cause – Effect
• Problem and Solution
Reutzel, Cooter
(2008)
NARRATIVE STORY STRUCTURE
Beginning
Middle
End
NARRATIVE STORY STRUCTURE
Story
Setting Map
Problem
Goal
Events
Resolution
(Reutzel, 1985)
Readers who know how an informational
text is organized have a better idea of how
to read and understand its content. For
example, when they know a text has a
cause and effect structure, they can focus
on finding the cause(s) and result(s) that the
text is highlighting. Once they know what to
focus on while they are reading, they get a
clear frame of the text, which helps them
better comprehend content.
INFORMATIONAL TEXTS HAVE CLEAR
TEXT STRUCTURES:
• Time order organizes information into a
chronological sequence.
• Description explains an idea or concept.
• Listing /classification arranges a group of
facts, concepts, or events.
• Compare and contrast analyzes similarities
and differences among concepts and events.
• Cause and effect presents how an event or
fact brings about another event or result.
• Problem and solution presents a problem with
Reutzel & Cooter (2007)
a solution.
Time Order/
Sequence
This structure is organized from
one point in time to another.
It’s also the most similar to
narrative.
• Sequence text structures
are the easiest for younger
students.
• Books to teach this structure
include counting books,
days of the week, months of
the year, seasons, life
cycles, directions, and some
question and answer books.
Reutzel & Cooter (2008)
SEQUENCE TEXT STRUCTURE FRAME
Here is how a ________________________ is made.
First, ________________________. Next,
______________________. Then,
______________________. Finally,
______________________.
LISTING/
CLASSIFICATION
• Lists ideas on a specific topic (dogs, frog,
evaporation) one after the other.
• States main topic in the topic sentence
and has a list of examples for support.
LISTING / CLASSIFICATION
TEXT STRUCTURE FRAME
______________________ is the title of the selection.
Three categories or classifications are part of this
topic. The first classification is
_____________________________. Some examples are
_____________________________. The second
classification is _____________________________. In
particular, _____________________________. The third
classification is _____________________________.
Specifically, _____________________________. These
categories are related _____________________________.
Description
This text structure:
• Describes the
attributes and
features of people,
places, or items
• Describes one
topic
DESCRIPTIVE TEXT STRUCTURE
FRAME
There are ___________ kinds of _______________.
The first kind of ____________________________ is
_________________________. It ________________.
The second one is ________________________. It
________________________________________________
_______________________________________. The
third kind is ___________________________. It
__________________________________________. Now
you can recognize the ___________________ kinds
of ___________________________.
Compare and Contrast
• Shows how two or more
ideas or items are similar or
different.
• May use a clustered
approach, with details
about one topic followed
by details about the other
topic.
• May show an alternating
approach, with the author
going between the two
topics.
• Is fairly easy for students to
understand.
GOOSE BUMPS
Text Structures and the Revolutionary War
Directions: Read the passages and on a sheet of paper, put the information from each passage into an appropriate graphic organizer.
The following graphic organizers are examples. Feel free to make changes if necessary.
Chronological
Sequence
Cause and Effect
Problem and Solution
Compare and Contrast
1. Divisions
The Revolutionary War was a time of great division. Americans were split into two groups: Patriots and Loyalists. Patriots were Americans who supported
the struggle for independence. They believed that Americans should be free from the control of an English king. They fought against the English to establish
a new government in America. Loyalists were Americans who remained loyal to the crown. Some of them were happy under English rule. Others believed
that they might be rewarded after the Americans lost the war. Though both Patriots and Loyalists lived in America, a deep division ran between them.
2. The Turning Point
Though the Americans suffered many losses early on in the war, the momentum began to shift after the Battles of Saratoga. During the Battles of Saratoga,
the Americans captured British General Burgoyne’s army. This victory convinced other countries, especially France, that the Americans could win the war.
Because of this, not only did France declare war on England, but other nations also began openly supporting the American fight for independence. The Battles
of Saratoga will be remembered as a pivotal moment in this fight.
3. Guerilla Warfare
In most cases American soldiers could not stand toe-to-toe against British soldiers. The British were better trained, better armed, and more experienced.
When the American soldiers attempted to match the British, they suffered heavy losses. The Americans had to use what advantages they had, so they
developed what are now known as Guerilla Warfare tactics. Guerrilla warfare is a form of fighting where small groups of fighters use ambushes, sabotages,
and the elements of surprise to harass a larger, less mobile army. By using Guerilla Warfare tactics, American soldiers were able to equalize some of the
British’s advantages on the battlefield.
4. Fire Cake
American soldiers during the Revolutionary War suffered horrible conditions to win independence. You can experience some of these conditions by eating the
same food that soldiers ate at Valley Forge: fire cake. Fire cake is a horrible tasting blob of burnt gluten. To make some first mix flour with water until you
get thick, damp dough. Then, form it into a cake and in your palms. Put this doughy lump on a greased cookie sheet and bake it until it is brown. This will be
very similar to the awful fire cakes that American soldiers ate at Valley Forge. Enjoy!
5. Allies
During the Revolutionary War, Americans learned just how important friends can be. When the Americans declared independence on July 4th, 1776, they had
virtually no allies. But on February 6th, 1778, after the American victory at Saratoga, the French assisted the American cause. The French went into deep debt
helping the Americans. The Americans would receive additional help in June of 1779, when the Spanish joined the fight against the British. They would
secure Southern ports and supply lines. Without the help of these allies, many more Americans would have died in the fight for independence.
TEXT STRUCTURE GAME
• Divide into 5 groups
• Each group gets a colored stack
of graphic organizers to sort
LET’S PRACTICE TEXT STRUCTURES
INFORMATIONAL TEXT LEVEL 2
VOCABULARY
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
All about meaning of words:
Page 13 - RL2.4; Page 15 – RI2.4
Page 14 - RL3.4; Page 16 - RI3.4
DYNAMIC VOCABULARY
INSTRUCTION
ANITA L ARCHER, PHD
EXPLICIT INSTRUCTION: EFFECTIVE AND
EFFICIENT TEACHING
IMPORTANCE OF VOCABULARY
INSTRUCTION
 Children’s vocabulary in the early grades
relates to reading comprehension in the
upper grades.
 Preschool - Children’s vocabulary correlated with reading
comprehension in upper elementary school. (Dickinson & Tabois, 2001)
 Kindergarten - Vocabulary size was an effective predictor of
reading comprehension in middle elementary years. (Scarborough,
1998)
 First Grade - Orally tested vocabulary was a significant predictor
of reading comprehension ten years later. (Cunningham & Stanovich,
1997)
 Third Grade - Children with restricted vocabulary have declining
comprehension scores in the later elementary years. (Chall, Jacobs, &
Baldwin, 1990)
EXPLICIT VOCABULARY
INSTRUCTION
Evidence suggests that as late as
Grade 6, about 80% of words are
learned as a result of direct
explanation, either as a result of the
child’s request or instruction,
usually by a teacher. (Biemiller, 1999,
2005)
IMPORTANCE OF VOCABULARY
INSTRUCTION - CONCLUSION
To close the vocabulary gap,
vocabulary acquisition must be
accelerated through intentional
instruction.
Vocabulary instruction must be a
focus in all classes in all grades.
COMPONENTS OF A VOCABULARY
PROGRAM
 High-quality Classroom Language (Dickinson,
Cote, & Smith, 1993)
 Reading Aloud to Students (Elley, 1989; Senechal, 1997)
 Explicit Vocabulary Instruction (Baker, Kame’enui,
& Simmons, 1998; Baumann, Kame’enui, & Ash, 2003; Beck & McKeown, 1991; Beck,
McKeown, & Kucan, 2002; Biemiller, 2004; Marzano, 2004; Paribakht & Wesche, 1997)
 Word-Learning Strategies (Buikima & Graves, 1993; Edwards,
Font, Baumann, & Boland, 2004; Graves, 2004; White, Sowell, & Yanagihara, 1989)
 Wide Independent Reading (Anderson & Nagy, 1992;
Cunningham & Stanovich, 1998; Nagy, Anderson, & Herman, 1987; Sternberg, 1987)
USE HIGH QUALITY LANGUAGE
 Use high quality vocabulary in the
classroom.
To ensure understanding provide a little
explanation of the unknown word’s
meaning.
Directly tell students the meaning of the
word.
 “Don’t procrastinate on your assignment.
Procrastinate means to put off doing
something.”
Pair the unknown word with a synonym.
 “Laws have their genesis -- their beginning -- in
EXPLICIT VOCABULARY INSTRUCTION –
SELECTION OF VOCABULARY
Select a limited number of words for
robust, explicit vocabulary instruction.
Three to ten words per story or section
in a chapter would be appropriate.
 Briefly tell students the meaning of
other words that are needed for
comprehension.
EXPLICIT VOCABULARY INSTRUCTION –
SELECTION OF VOCABULARY (BECK &
MCKEOWN, 1985)
 Tier One - Basic words
 chair, bed, happy, house
 Tier Two - Words in general use in many
domains (Academic Vocabulary)
 concentrate, absurd, fortunate, relieved, dignity,
convenient, observation, analyze, persistence
(Academic vocabulary)
 Tier Three - Rare words limited to a specific
domain (Background Knowledge)
 tundra, igneous rocks, constitution, area, sacrifice fly,
genre, foreshadowing
EXPLICIT VOCABULARY INSTRUCTION –
PREPARE STUDENT-FRIENDLY
EXPLANATIONS
 Dictionary Definition
relieved - (1) To free wholly or partly from
pain, stress, pressure. (2) To lessen or alleviate,
as pain or pressure
 Student-Friendly Explanation (Beck, McKeown, &
Kucan, 2003)
Is easy to understand.
When something that was difficult is over or
never happened at all, you feel relieved.
TEACH THE MEANING OF CRITICAL,
UNKNOWN VOCABULARY WORDS.
INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINE
 (Note: Teach words AFTER you have read a story to your students
and BEFORE students read a selection.)
 Step 1. Introduce the word.
 Write the word on the board or document camera.
 Read the word and have the students repeat the word.
 If the word is difficult to pronounce or unfamiliar have the students
repeat the word a number of times.
Introduce the word with me.
 “ This word is relieved. What word?”
TEACH THE MEANING OF CRITICAL,
UNKNOWN VOCABULARY WORDS.
INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINE
 Step 2. Present a student-friendly
explanation.
 Tell students the explanation. OR
 Have them read the explanation with you.
Present the definition with me.
 “When
something that is difficult is
over or never happened at all, you feel
relieved. So if something that is difficult
is over, you would feel
_______________.”
TEACH THE MEANING OF CRITICAL,
UNKNOWN VOCABULARY WORDS.
INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINE
 Step 3. Illustrate the word with examples.
 Concrete examples.
 Visual representations.
 Verbal examples.
Present the examples with me.
 “When the spelling test is over, you feel
relieved.”
 “When you have finished giving the speech
that
you dreaded, you feel relieved.”
TEACH THE MEANING OF CRITICAL,
UNKNOWN VOCABULARY WORDS.
INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINE
 Step 4. Check students’ understanding.
 Option #1. Ask deep processing questions.
Check students’ understanding with me.
 When the students lined up for morning
recess, Jason said, “I am so relieved that this
morning is over.” Why might Jason be
relieved?
 When Maria was told that the soccer game
had been cancelled, she said, “I am relieved.”
Why might Maria be relieved?
TEACH THE MEANING OF CRITICAL,
UNKNOWN VOCABULARY WORDS.
INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINE
 Step 4. Check students’ understanding.
 Option #2. Have students discern between
examples and non-examples.
Check students’ understanding with me.
 “If you were nervous singing in front of others,
would you feel relieved when the concert was
over?” Yes “Why?”
 “If you loved singing to audiences, would you feel
relieved when the concert was over?” No “Why
not?” It was not difficult for you.
TEACH THE MEANING OF CRITICAL,
UNKNOWN VOCABULARY WORDS.
INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINE
 Step 4. Check students’ understanding.
 Option #3. Have students generate their own
examples.
Check students’ understanding with me.
 “Tell your partner about a time when you
were relieved.”
TEACH THE MEANING OF CRITICAL,
UNKNOWN VOCABULARY WORDS.
INSTRUCTIONAL ROUTINE
 Step 4. Check students’ understanding.
 Option #4. Provide students with a “sentence
starter”. Have them say the
complete
sentence.
Check students’ understanding with me.
 Sometimes your mother is relieved. Tell your
partner when your mother is relieved. Start
your sentence by saying, “My mother is
relieved when________.”
TRANSFER THE WORD INTO EVERYDAY
USE
•
Graduated Word: orbit
•
How many times did you use “orbit” this week in
your speaking, reading, and writing?
Orbit
OTHER WAYS TO DEVELOP
CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING
Act it out:
• Girls orbit around a new boy at
school.
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
VOCABULARY LEVEL 2
CRAFT & STRUCTURE
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
All about meaning of words:
Page 13 - RL2.4; Page 15 – RI2.4
Page 14 - RL3.4; Page 16 - RI3.4
LEVEL 2 TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTION
VOCABULARY
• What context clues on page 2 of the “Earth &
Moon” booklet help us to understand what the
word appearance means?
ACADEMIC VOCABULARY
FROM THE CORE
• When talking about vocabulary, we must
remember to use the vocabulary and language
from the core with our students.
Key Ideas & Details
Text Structure
Evidence
Support
Events
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
VOCABULARY LEVEL 2
CRAFT & STRUCTURE
LEVEL 2 TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTION
VOCABULARY
• What context clues on page 2 of the “Earth &
Moon” booklet help us to understand what the
word appearance means?
ACADEMIC VOCABULARY
FROM THE CORE
• When talking about vocabulary, we must
remember to use the vocabulary and language
from the core with our students.
Key Ideas & Details
Text Structure
Evidence
Support
Events
LITERATURE
LEVEL 2
CRAFT & STRUCTURE
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Page 13 - RL2.6
Page 14 – RL3.4 and RL3.6
LITERATURE LEVEL 2
CRAFT & STRUCTURE
WRITING LEVEL 2 QUESTIONS
Vocabulary and Text Structure question stem examples:
What is the literal meaning of ___________________?
What is the figurative meaning of __________________?
How does the sequence of events/order of claims develop the
piece?
Author’s Purpose question stem examples:
Why did the author write this?
What do we know about the narrator?
Who’s story is not represented?
CREATE LEVEL 2 QUESTIONS FROM
THIS SELECTION
CREATE YOUR OWN LEVEL 2 QUESTION
CONNECTING THE ARTS
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Page 25 - S&L2.1
Page 26 - S&L3.1
CONNECTING THE ARTS
• Art enhances learning, social, and emotional
development.
• Art is connected to self-confidence, persistence,
concentration, comprehension, conflict resolution,
motivation, cognitive engagement, risk-taking,
perseverance, and leadership.
• Several studies show that children become more
engaged in their studies when the arts are integrated
into their lessons.
• Others show that at-risk students often find pathways
through the arts to broader academic successes.
•
http://www.giarts.org/article/connections-between-education-arts-and-student-achievement
INCORPORATING ART
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Open ended drawings
Collages
Paintings
Poetry
Drama
Music
Story telling
Sculpting
INTEGRATING ART INTO THE
CLASSROOM
• Art is an outstanding tool for teaching not only
developmental skills, but also academic subjects
such as math, science, and literacy.
• The most effective learning takes place when
children do something related to the topic they are
learning.
• This information has been recognized by teachers
since the time of Confucius, when he said: "I hear
and I forget. I see and I remember; I do and I
understand.“
•
Art Influences Learning By Anna Reyner Early Childhood News
ART & LITERACY
• Children who draw pictures of stories they have
read improve their reading comprehension, and
are motivated to read new material (Deasy &
Stevenson, 2002).
•
Art Influences Learning By Anna Reyner Early Childhood News
STEPPING INTO THE PAINTING
• This visual arts strategy involves carefully inspecting
a chosen painting as a way to interpret personal
meaning for each student.
• Students then combine their interpretations to
create a global story from the painting.
NORMAN ROCKWELL
PHOTO INSPIRATION
HOMEWORK
• Read Text Complexity article “7 Actions that
Teachers Can Take Right Now: Text Complexity” by
Elfrieda H. Hiebert
• Answer the Level 1 and Level 2 questions
• Level 1 question: What does the author claim
teachers can do to support students using
complex text?
• Level 2 question: How would you rank the seven
actions teachers can take? Cite evidence to
support your decisions.
HEARTS AND WISHES
• 3 Hearts are things you will take back, or
that you found helpful.
• A Wish is something you need more
information on or we did not cover.
Something you WISH you knew more
about from today (please don’t comment
on things like temperature etc.).

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