The College of New Jersey - Career & Community Studies

Report
2011 State of the Art Conference on
Postsecondary Education and
Individuals with Intellectual
Disabilities
Rick Blumberg PhD TPSID Director
Rebecca Daley M.S. CCS Director
Amy K. Schuler M.S. Career Specialist
Student Mentors/Job Coaches
Rachel Adelman
Kristen Lewis
Theresa Lombardi
Danielle Travisano
Katie Gallagher
Program Attributes
 Approved CTP program
 Full-time four year program
 Ages 18-25 at time of admission
 Cohort model
 Mentor supported
 Certificate from TCNJ
 Alumni activities and events
CCS Components
 Liberal learning
 CCS Core Curriculum
 Inclusive TCNJ coursework
 Career exploration
 On campus practicum
 Community Internship
 Socialization/self determination
 Extracurricular activities
 Independent living
CCS students
 First cohort Fall 2006
 Twelve student graduates
 Currently enrolled 34 students
 Residential /off campus housing 29
 Funding resources
 DDD Real Life Choices
 School District
 FAFSA eligible Pell Grant
 TCNJ Scholarship
Student’s
work
experiences
The Need
 We discovered early in the development of our
program that:
 most incoming freshman had little knowledge of their
disability
 had engaged in few career development activities in
High School and so,

had little information upon which to develop meaningful
career goals.
Career Development
 We adopted the career development stage framework
articulated by Brolin (1997) in designing coursework
and related experiences.
 These development stages includes
 Career awareness,
Career
Development
 Exploration
 Preparation, and
 Assimilation
Awareness
Exploration
Preparation
Assimilation
Career Awareness
 Approached during Freshman year through self
assessment and knowledge development activities.
 Through Career Exploration coursework, students are
exposed to content that addresses:
 Why people work,
 The benefits of employment,
 Types of careers people engage in, &
 Work expectations including:
 Education,
 Training, and
 Skill requirements
Self Assessment
 Students begin to identify
 their abilities,
 Interests, and
 preferences.
 An important outcome is the
student’s developing
understanding of the types of
accommodations and
supports he/she needs to be
successful.
Career Exploration
In Sophomore
year, students
begin a series of
brief on-campus
work experiences
in occupational
“clusters”
Administrative/Office
mgmt
Information
Technology
Health/Fitness
Retail/Customer
service
Hospitality
Career Exploration
 Sophomores choose experiences within these clusters
based upon their individual interests and preferences
 Work experiences are task analyzed so that job
coaching can be effectively provided by peer mentors,
and students receive clear feedback on their
performance
 These on-campus work experiences are generally the
same offered other typically admitted undergraduates
Career Preparation
 Conducted during Junior year with 1-2 on campus work
experiences that reflect the student’s emerging career
goals, and represent a good match between abilities,
skills and preferences.
 Career coursework focuses on resume development,
interview skills and an exploration of available
community based internships/employment
opportunities
Career Assimilation
 Is accomplished during senior year through an
intensive (12-15hr. per wk.) internship or paid
employment experience.
 Workplace support is provided by trained peer
mentors and supervised by CCS Faculty.
 Data is collected and reviewed with students to
evaluate their performance, workplace
accommodations, and the “match” between the
student and job/career path
Practicum and Internships
On Campus
Off Campus
 Admissions





 Sodexo food Service
 Records & Registration
 Mailroom
 Kids-Bridge Museum
 Library
 Public Relations
 Media Technology
 Information Technology





NJ state Nursing Association
Mercer ARC
WaWa
Educational Testing Services
Stepping Stone Learning
Institute
Hopewell Physical Therapy
Michaels
NJ Credit Union
American Cancer Society
NJ State Dept Of Disability
Service
Video Modeling
 Video modeling (VM) typically involves a person
viewing a clip of someone performing the steps of a
task/skill, and then performing that task themselves. It
involves visual and auditory prompting
 Recent research suggests that VM can be used to
successfully teach a variety of skills (academic, career,
social, self care) to individuals with IDD. (Rehfelt at al,
2003; Mangiapello & Taylor, 2003; & Nikopolous &
Keenan, 2003)
A Promising Practice
 VM appears to improve the pace of learning, improve
task accuracy/quality, improve generalization, and
increase independence (Van Laarhoven et al, 2009;
 Students may prefer VM to traditional forms of
systematic instruction (Hume, Loftin & Lantz, 2009)
 It does not appear to matter if the student views
him/herself or others modeling the task/skill
A Pilot Demonstration
 To get some experience with VM and it’s application to
College students with IDD, we conducted a pilot
demonstration in Fall 2001 semester
 We wanted to see how iPAD technology could be used
to help students learn job skills and the social skills
associated with them.
Our Process
 Task analyze on-campus work experiences
 Demonstrate the tasks for students
 Direct students to perform the tasks
 Provide a hierarchy of prompts until students
complete the task (gestural, verbal, physical w/ verbal
direction, modeling w/verbal direction
 Take observational data on the types of prompts
needed
Using video
 Create film clips of the task analysis using student




models
Provide visual and verbal directions within the video
Have students view the video prior to performing the
task
Remind students that they can view the video as
needed
Take observational data on the number of times
students view the video to independent task
completion
Ateev
 Sophomore
 Polite, wants to be liked by others
 Does not respond well to social cues, difficulty with
social interactions
 He has difficulty initiating interactions/conversations
with peers at lunch
Baseline Data: Ateev
#
Trial
Steps
1
2
3
1
Walk up to the person.
2
0
1
2
Look them in the eyes and say hello.
1
2
2
3
After they respond, ask them how their day is going.
2
2
2
4
Once they answer, them them know how your day is going.
0
0
0
5
Ask that person if they would like to sit with you for lunch.
2
0
2
6
If they say yes, guide them to your seat.
1
2
2
7
Continue conversation by saying, "What classes do you have this afternoon?"
2x
8
Do not repeat any questions you have asked or anything you have said.
0
0
0
9
Do not repeat anything your friend has said.
0
0
0
Total
10
6
13
Date
9/30
9/30
10/4
0 = Independent Response
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
3 = Physical Prompt w/ Verbal
Direction
5 = Direct Physical
Assistance w/ Verbal
Direction
4
Video: Initiating Conversation
Post-Data: Ateev
#
Trial
Steps
4
5
6
1
Walk up to the person.
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
Look them in the eyes and say hello.
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
After they respond, ask them how their day is going.
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
Once they answer, them them know how your day is going.
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
Ask that person if they would like to sit with you for lunch.
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
If they say yes, guide them to your seat.
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
Continue converstaion by saying, "What classes do you have this afternoon?"
0
1
0
1
0
0
8
Do not repeat any questions you have asked or anything you have said.
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
Do not repeat anything your friend has said.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
2
0 = Independent Response
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
Total
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
3 = Physical Prompt w/ Verbal
Direction
5 = Direct Physical
Assistance w/ Verbal
Direction
Date
10/20
10/21
10/25
Graph Data
Social Skills post-iPad
5
5
4
4
3
Trial 1
2
Trial 2
Trial 3
1
Level of Prompting
Level of Prompting
Social Skills pre-iPad
Trial 4a
3
Trial 4b
Trial 5a
2
Trial 5b
Trial 6a
1
Trial 6b
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Step Number
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
Stemp Number
7
8
9
Chelsea
 Junior
 Hardworking, sweet personality
 Waitress in 1855 dining hall
 Task: serving drinks to customers
 Incorporates social skills with multi-step tasks
Baseline Data: Ordering water
#
Trial
Steps
1
1
Go up to a customer that has not been waited on.
2
2
Ask them what they would like to drink.
2
3
Get a cup off the shelf.
0
4
Put a big scoop of ice into it.
2
5
Push the blue water fountain button.
0
6
Bring the drink back to the customer.
0
0 = Independent Response
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
Total
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
3 = Physical Prompt w/ Verbal
Direction
5 = Direct Physical
Assistance w/ Verbal
Direction
Date
6
Video: Ordering Water
Post-Data: water
#
Trial
Steps
2
1
Go up to a customer that has not been waited on.
0
0
2
Ask them what they would like to drink.
0
0
3
Get a cup off the shelf.
0
0
4
Put a big scoop of ice into it.
0
0
5
Push the blue water fountain button.
0
0
6
Bring the drink back to the customer.
0
0
0
0
0 = Independent Response
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
Total
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
3 = Physical Prompt w/ Verbal
Direction
5 = Direct Physical Assistance
w/ Verbal Direction
Date
Graph Data
Serving Water post-iPad
5
5
4
4
3
Trial 1
2
1
Level of Prompting
Level of Prompting
Serving Water pre-iPad
3
Trial 2a
2
Trial 2b
1
0
0
1
2
3
4
Step Number
5
6
1
2
3
4
Step Number
5
6
Baseline Data: ordering coffee
#
Trial
Steps
1
2
1
Go up to a customer that has not been waited on.
2
0
2
Ask them what they would like to drink.
0
0
3
Get a coffee cup off of the shelf.
2
0
4
Press the orange decaf button down.
2
2
5
Put the coffee on a plate.
0
2
6
Put a spoon on the plate.
0
0
7
Put crème on the plate.
0
0
8
Bring the coffee back to the customer.
0
0
6
4
0 = Independent Response
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
Total
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
3 = Physical Prompt w/ Verbal
Direction
5 = Direct Physical Assistance
w/ Verbal Direction
Date
Video: Ordering Coffee
Post-Data: Coffee
#
Trial
Steps
3
4
5
1
Go up to a customer that has not been waited on.
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
Ask them what they would like to drink.
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
Get a coffee cup off of the shelf.
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
Press the orange decaf button down.
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
Put the coffee on a plate.
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
Put a spoon on the plate.
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
Put crème on the plate.
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
Bring the coffee back to the customer.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 = Independent Response 2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt
w/ Verbal Direction
Total
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
3 = Physical Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
5 = Direct Physical
Assistance w/ Verbal
Direction
Date
Graph Data
Serving Coffee post-iPad
5
5
4
4
3
Trial 1
2
Trial 2
1
Level of Prompting
Level of Prompting
Serving Coffee pre-iPad
Trial 3a
3
Trial 3b
Trial 4a
2
Trial 4b
Trial 5a
Trial 5b
1
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
Step Number
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
Step Number
6
7
8
Baseline Data: Ellis
#
Steps
Trial
2
1
3
1
Lift up your collar.
1
1
1
2
Put the tie around your neck with the wide end on the right side and the narrow end on the left side
1
0
1
3
4
Hold wide end of tie with right hand and narrow end of tie with left hand.
Adjust the length, so that the narrow end is at the tip of your pants.
0
2
0
2
0
2
5
Using the right hand, cross the wide end of the tie over the narrow end of the tie.
1
0
1
6
Switch your hands, so that the wide end is in your left hand and the narrow end is in your right hand.
2
0
0
7
Using your left hand, bring the wide end of the tie behind the narrow end ending on the right side.
2
1
2
8
Switch your hands again, so that the right hand is holding the wide end and the left hand is holding the narrow end.
0
0
0
9
Using your right hand, cross the wide end in front of the tie ending on the left side.
2
2
2
10
Switch your hands, so that the wide end of the tie is in your left hand and the narrow end is in your right hand.
0
0
0
11
Using your left hand, bring the wide end of the tie up through the loop that was created around your neck and pull it
through.
3
3
3
12
Still using the left hand, take the wide end of the tie and put it through the loop at the frong of the tie.
3
3
3
13
Slowly move the tie up making it tight and straight.
Put your collar down.
2
1
0
1
0
1
Total
20
13
16
Date
10/13
10/13
10/13
14
0 = Independent Response
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt w/ Verbal Direction
3 = Physical Prompt w/ Verbal Direction
5 = Direct Physical Assistance w/ Verbal
Direction
Ellis
 Sophomore
 Quiet, polite. Likes to work on his own (without
mentor support)
 Work experience: MTSS/tech
 Skill: tying a tie
 Wanted to learn, helpful for internships and job
interviews
Video: Tying a Tie
Post-Data: Ellis
#
Steps
1
5
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
13
Adjust the length, so that the narrow end is at the tip of your pants.
Using the right hand, cross the wide end of the tie over the narrow end of
the tie.
Switch your hands, so that the wide end is in your left hand and the narrow
end is in your right hand.
Using your left hand, bring the wide end of the tie behind the narrow end
ending on the right side.
Switch your hands again, so that the right hand is holding the wide end and
the left hand is holding the narrow end.
Using your right hand, cross the wide end in front of the tie ending on the left
side.
Switch your hands, so that the wide end of the tie is in your left hand and the
narrow end is in your right hand.
Using your left hand, bring the wide end of the tie up through the loop that
was created around your neck and pull it through.
Still using the left hand, take the wide end of the tie and put it through the
loop at the frong of the tie.
Slowly move the tie up making it tight and straight.
14
Put your collar down.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Lift up your collar.
Put the tie around your neck with the wide end on the right side and the
narrow end on the left side
Hold wide end of tie with right hand and narrow end of tie with left hand.
0 = Independent Response
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
3 = Physical Prompt w/ Verbal
Direction
5 = Direct Physical
Assistance w/ Verbal
Direction
Total
Date
4
0
Trial
6
0
7
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
15
0
3
0
0
0
3
0
1
10/25
10/25
10/25
10/28
10/28
Graph Data
Tie with Ellie post-iPad
5
5
4
4
3
Trial 1
Trial 2
2
Trial 3
1
Level of Prompting
Level of Prompting
Tie with Ellis pre-iPad
Trial 4a
Trial 4b
Trial 5a
3
Trial 5b
Trial 6a
2
Trial 6b
Trial 7a
Trial 7b
1
Trial 8a
Trial 8b
0
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Step Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14
Step Number
Lauren
 Junior
 Very social and affectionate
 Works in Records and Registration
 Observed that she tended to hug and say “I love you”
to 0thers including her supervisor
 Skill: appropriately greeting her supervisor at start of
shift
Baseline Data: Lauren
Trial
#
1
2
1
Look the person in the eyes and say, "Hi! How are you today?"
0
0
2
When they finish answering your question, tell them how your day is going
2
2
3
Then ask, "What tasks would you like me to do today?"
2
2
4
After the person finishes explaining your tasks, say, "Great! I will get right to work!"
2
2
5
Do no tell the person you love them.
2
0
6
Do not give the person a hug.
0
0
8
6
0 = Independent Response
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
Total
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
3 = Physical Prompt w/ Verbal
Direction
5 = Direct Physical
Assistance w/ Verbal
Direction
Date
Video: Conversation at Work
Post-Data: Lauren
Trial
#
3
4
5
1
Look the person in the eyes and say, "Hi! How are you today?"
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
When they finish answering your question, tell them how your day is going
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
Then ask, "What tasks would you like me to do today?"
0
1
0
0
0
0
4
After the person finishes explaining your tasks, say, "Great! I will get right to
work!"
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
Do no tell the person you love them.
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
Do not give the person a hug.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0 = Independent
Response
2 = Verbal Prompt Only
4 = Modeling Prompt
w/ Verbal Direction
Total
1 = Gestural Prompt Only
3 = Physical Prompt w/
Verbal Direction
5 = Direct Physical
Assistance w/
Verbal Direction
Date 10/24
10/26
10/31
Graph Data
Work Place Conversation
post-iPad
5
5
4
4
3
Trial 1
2
Trial 2
Level of Prompting
Level of Promting
Work Place Converstaion preiPad
Trial 3b
Trial 4a
2
1
0
0
2
3
4
Step Number
5
6
Trial 4b
Trial 5a
1
1
Trial 3a
3
Trial 5b
1
2
3
4
Step Number
5
6
Career And Community Studies
(CCS)

similar documents