Peer Mentor Training Program

Report
LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR VIRGINIA’S PEER
MENTORING NETWORK
The Arc of Virginia is partnering with the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Department
of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and Hope House
Foundation to launch a statewide Peer Mentoring Network. The program will
connect individuals transitioning out of state-operated Training Centers with
individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) currently
living and receiving integrated services in the community.
PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS:
•
15 Self-Advocates that will be trained to become Peer-Mentors
•
15 Support Partners that will each work in partnership with a PeerMentor
•
15 Training Center Residents that will be paired up with trained Peer
Mentors
•
15 Community Residents that are seeking improved community-based
services
PEER MENTOR TRAINING PROGRAM
The first step towards developing this network is the Peer Mentor Training
Program!
This program will train fifteen individuals with ID/DD to become skilled
Peer Mentors, providing them with a strong understanding of the
service system and excellent mentorship skills.
The program consists of a 12–month training course and a 6-month
mentorship period, during which time the participants will mentor one
training center resident and one individual living in the community
desiring access to more integrated community-based services.
Upon completion of the program, participants will be prepared to serve
as skilled Peer Mentors.
WHAT IS A PEER MENTOR?
Peer – someone who is equal to another person in a shared trait:
Abilities
Background
Qualifications
Employment
Age
Gender
Mentor – a wise and trusted counselor or teacher
Peer Mentor – someone that helps others:
• Learn how to speak up for themselves
.
• Understand and advocate for their own rights
• Understand and make informed decision .
SELF-ADVOCACY VS. PEER-ADVOCACY
Advocacy
Speaking up for rights
Self-Advocacy
Speaking up for your own rights
Peer-Advocacy
Helping others to speak up for their own rights
WHY IS THE PEER PART SO IMPORTANT?
It is helpful to have someone that has experienced the same things you
have experienced
A peer understands and knows the system for the inside
Support staff is always saying how it should be, but the person with the
disabilities knows it better than the support staff
WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO BE A PEER MENTOR?
 It is a job
 Helping other people understand their rights and options
 Helping people figure out what they want and need based on their options
 Helping people get what they want and need
 Harder to be a peer-advocate than a self-advocate
 People may want you to come in and do things for them
 But that is not being a Peer-Advocate
 Being a Peer-Advocate/Mentor is being with them and supporting them in
doing things for themselves
 It is a partnership!
WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO BE A PEER MENTOR?
 Help someone speak up for themselves
 Give suggestions
 Practice/ rehearse
 Support the person in doing for himself
 Work your support through the person you are supporting
 You are not empowering someone if you are speaking for them
 Your job is to help someone speak up for themselves, not to solve their problems
for them
 Your job is NOT to make decisions for the person – it is to support their personal
decision-making
 You’ve got to feel brave – ready to speak up
 Politely and calmly
ROLE OF PEER MENTOR PROGRAM
PARTICIPANTS
1. To participate in training on how to be a peer mentor
2. To be paired up with a resident of a training center that is in the process of moving
out of the training center and with a peer in the community - to provide guidance
on community living and community-based services
3. To develop relationships with your peers and assist them in gaining skills in the
areas of:
- Self-advocacy
- Exercising choices and preferences
- Understanding Rights and Options
- Increasing Independence
RESPONSIBILITIES OF A PEER MENTOR:
•
Full attendance at SIX 3-hour bi-monthly training seminar
•
Completion of all homework assignments
•
Dedication to the development of 2 mentoring relationships
•
A future vision of serving as a Peer Mentor to individuals transitioning out
of state-operated Training Centers
•
The dedication of a support partner who is committed to the program, able
to attend all 6 training seminars, and desires to serve as a partner to the
Peer Mentor
RESPONSIBILITIES OF A PEER MENTOR:
To live by the principles of Self-Determination in your own life
FREEDOM – to decide how you want to live your life
AUTHORITY – over the decisions made in your life
MEANINGFUL INVOLVEMENT – to participate in your support plan that organizes
resources in ways that are life enhancing and meaningful
RESPONSIBILITY – taking accountability for the things that are within your control
– being dependable and reliable
To participate in Regional Support Teams and Quality Councils
Peer Mentors will be expected to serve as representatives on Regional Support
Teams and Quality Councils
ROLE OF THE SUPPORT PARTNER
•
To attend ALL six required peer-mentoring training sessions
•
To support the Peer Mentors in their mentorship roles, including but not
limited to:
• Participating in peer mentor trainings
• Completing peer-education activities
• Developing partnerships with training center residents
• Participating in Regional Support Teams and Quality Councils
•
To support the Self-Determination of the Peer Mentors
TIMELINE OF ACTIVITIES
TRAINERS:
• Community Systems Training:
The Arc of Virginia, DBHDS, guest presenters
• Peer-Mentoring Skills Training:
Dorothy Clark and Angela Stevens
COMMUNITY SYSTEMS TRAINING TOPICS
DOJ Agreement
Medicaid Wavier services
Housing
Supported Decision Making
Community Inclusion
Employment
Crisis Support/START Program
Voting
Benefits
PEER MENTORING PARTNERSHIPS
This program is designed to train a partnership of two people. One the peer mentor - is a person with an intellectual or
developmental disability whose role is to focus on, connect and
work directly with their peer. The other – the mentor partner – is
a committed staff, friend or acquaintance whose role is to
anticipate, address, and problem-solve barriers to the
establishment and maintenance of this peer relationship during
both training and active mentoring. Through this partnership,
the mentoring can maintain focus and everyone can keep their
eyes on the prize.
REGIONAL SUPPORT TEAMS
Purpose: “To provide recommendations in resolving barriers to the most
integrated community settings consistent with an individual’s needs and
informed choice.”
Who do they support: “Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) or
developmental disabilities (DD), who live in training centers, meet the ID
or DD Waiver waitlist criteria or live in a nursing home or intermediate
care facility for individuals with ID, and their individual support planning
teams.”
Who are the RST members: “RSTs include a variety of professionals in the
field of intellectual and developmental disabilities with expertise in
complex medical and behavioral supports. Members come from state,
local and private positions in the community.”*
*Adapted from: http://www.dbhds.virginia.gov/settlement/IV%20Regional%20Support%20Team%20Descriptions%20combined.pdf
BENEFITS OF PARTICIPATION
•
Connect with self-advocates across the state
•
Learn from experts about community-based services, advocacy and
peer-mentoring
•
Help individuals in your community gain increased independence and
direction over their lives and support services
There is no cost to participate in the program:
Reimbursement for Travel
Monetary Stipend (Payment for full participation)
HOW TO APPLY:
Fill out an application!
Mail to: Peer Mentor Training Program
2147 Staples Mill Road
Richmond VA, 23230
Email to:
[email protected]
CONTACT INFORMATION
Katherine Olson
– 804-649-8481 ext 104
– [email protected]
Katherine Malady
– 804-649-8481 ext 104
– 804-836-9364]
– [email protected]

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