Unit 4 PowerPoint Slides

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EET 2261 Unit 4
Arithmetic Instructions; Branching &
Iteration



Read Almy, Chapters 7 and 8.
Homework #4 and Lab #4 due next
week.
Quiz next week.
Addition Instructions
•
These are self-explanatory, except the two
instructions that add with carry. These are for multibyte addition. See next slide.
(Table from p. 59 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Multi-Byte Addition
•
Suppose we want to do this addition and store the
result at memory location $1000:
$2162
+ $33C3
•
Each of our operands is two bytes long. Since
Accumulator A can only hold one byte, we can’t do:
LDAA #$2162
ADDA #$33C3
STAA $1000
• But we can do it by breaking it down into two halves,
as shown on next slide.
Adding with Carry
• To add $2162 plus $33C3, use a two-step process:
1. Add the low-order bytes ($62 plus $C3) and
store the result at $1001.
2. Then add the high-order bytes ($21 plus $33),
remembering whether there was a carry from
the previous step. For this we use the ADCA
instruction. Store this result at $1000.
LDAA #$62
ADDA #$C3
STAA $1001
LDAA #$21
ADCA #$33
STAA $1000
Extending the Idea
•
The previous example showed how to add two twobyte numbers. We can extend the idea to numbers
of any length.
•
Example:
$12345678
+ $9ABCDEF0
•
We’d add the lowest-order bytes ($78 + $F0) using
ADDA, then add the higher-order bytes using three
ADCAs.
Subtraction Instructions
•
Again, these are self-explanatory, except the two
instructions that subtract with borrow, which are for
multi-byte subtraction. (Note that C, the “carry bit,”
acts as a borrow bit when we’re subtracting.)
(Table from p. 59 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Decrement and Increment
Instructions
(Table from
p. 61 of the
HCS12
CPU
Reference
Manual.)
•
Caution: INCA and ADDA #1 give the same result in A, but
these two instructions do not affect the CCR in the same way.
Negate Instructions
(Table from p. 63 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Multiplication Instructions
•
When multiplying, the register holding the result
must be twice the size of the registers holding the
operands.
•
Example: With 8-bit unsigned operands, the biggest
multiplication is 255 × 255, which equals 65,025 (or
%1111 1110 0000 0001).
•
Below, Y : D means Y and D combined together,
which is 32 bits.
(Table from p. 64 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Quotient and Remainder
•We know that 7 ÷ 2 = 3.5
•Recall that another way to say this is that
7 ÷ 2 = 3 with a remainder of 1.
•In this example, 3 is called the quotient and 1
is called the remainder.
•The HCS12’s division instructions give us
answers like “3 with a remainder of 1,” not
“3.5”.
•Another example: If you take 20÷8, what is the
quotient and what is the remainder?
Division Instructions
•
We’ll ignore FDIV, which does fractional division;
the other four division instructions are similar to
each other, since they all do integer division.
(Table from p. 64 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Logical Shift Instructions
•
These instructions shift in a 0 on end, and shift out
to the Carry bit on the other end.
(Table from p. 66 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Arithmetic Shift Instructions
•
The arithmetic shifts left are identical to the logical
shifts left. (For instance, ASL is identical to LSL.)
But the arithmetic shifts right are different from the
logical shifts right.
(Table from p. 66 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Rotate Instructions
•
The rotate instructions are similar to the logical shift
instructions, except the rotate instructions “wrap
around” the Carry bit from one end to the other end.
(Table from p. 66 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Review: Representing Numbers
•
We have several common methods for representing
numbers in digital systems.
• Standard binary representation, which comes in
two “flavors”:
• Unsigned binary
• Signed binary
•
Binary-coded decimal (BCD) representation,
which also comes in two “flavors”:
• Unpacked BCD
• Packed BCD
•
ASCII representation
Standard Binary Representation
•
Standard binary representation is the most efficient
(uses the least memory and is the fastest to
operate on).
•
We use unsigned binary representation when we
know that the range of numbers we’re dealing with
does not include negative numbers.
•
We use signed binary representation when the
numbers we’re dealing with may be positive or
negative. Negative numbers are represented in
two’s-complement form.
Binary-Coded Decimal (BCD)
Representation
•
Devices such as digital clocks that display
numbers in human-readable form often use
BCD representation.
•
In unpacked BCD, each byte holds a single
digit.
Example:
47 is represented as 0000 0100 0000 0111
•
In packed BCD, each byte holds two digits.
Example:
47 is represented as 0100 0111
ASCII Representation
•
ASCII is a widely recognized standard that
is often used for transferring data between
different programs or devices.
•
Example:
47 is represented as 0011 0100 0011 0111.
Review: Same Number, Different
Representations
•
We have several different ways of representing the
number 47:
•
In standard binary representation (signed or
unsigned), it’s
0010 1111
•
In unpacked BCD, it’s
0000 0100 0000 0111
•
In packed BCD, it’s
0100 0111
•
In ASCII, it’s
0011 0100 0011 0111
The DAA Instruction
• To add binary-coded decimal (BCD)
operands:
1. Add them using ABA, ADCA, or ADDA.
2. Then immediately execute the Decimal
Adjust A (DAA) instruction.
• The DAA instruction examines the Condition
Code Register’s H bit to decide how the
addition result needs to be adjusted.
Compare and Test Instructions
•
Compare and test instructions perform a
subtraction but don’t save the result anywhere.
•
They’re useful
because they set
the CCR bits
based on the
result. A compare
or test is usually
followed by a
branch instruction
that looks at the
CCR bits.
(Table from p. 62 of the HCS12 CPU Reference Manual.)
Flowcharts
•A flowchart is a diagram that shows the logic
of a computer program. (See pages 41-42 of textbook.)
•Arrows show the flow of the logic.
•A diamond represents a decision point, with
alternate paths based on the decision.
Read
Temperature
Temp >
70?
No
Turn on LED 1
Yes
Turn on LED 0
Straight-Line Structure
•The programs
we’ve studied up
to now had a
straight-line
structure, with no
decision points.
•Instructions
executed in order
from start to finish.
Start
Action 1
Action 2
.
.
.
Action n
End
Straight-Line Structure: Example
Flowchart
Start
Load 5 into A
Add 17 to A
Program
ABSENTRY Entry
ORG $2000
Entry: LDAA #05
ADDA #17
Load 3 into B
LDAB #03
Increment A
INCA
Decrement B
DECB
Add $1A to B
ADDB #$1A
END
End
Review: Program Counter
•
How does the HCS12 keep track of where it
is in a program? That’s the job of the
program counter (PC), a 16-bit register
that points to the address of the next
instruction to be executed.
•
Each time an instruction is executed, the PC
is automatically increased by the size of this
instruction (a number from 1 to 5) so that
the PC now points to the next instruction in
memory.
Program Counter: Example
PC
$2007
$2006
$2004
$2002
$2000
•
Initiallythe
While
PCADDA
LDAA
LDAB
INCA
= $2000,
isis
isbeing
being
being
pointing
executed,
executed,
executed,
to thePC
PC
PC
LDAA.
===$2007,
$2002,
$2006,
$2004,pointing
pointing
pointingto
to
tothe
the
theDECB.
ADDA.
INCA.
LDAB.
“Forever” Loop Structure
•Often we want a
program to
contain an
endless loop, in
which we keep
repeating the
same action(s)
over and over
again forever.
.
.
.
Action
Branch Instructions
•
To program the “forever” loop shown on the
previous slide, we use a branch
instruction.
•
As we’ll see, the HCS12 has more than 30
different branch instructions.
•
Branch instructions can change the default
order of execution by forcing the program
counter to point to an instruction other than
the next one in memory.
Branch Always (BRA)
•
The branch instruction that we need for our
“forever” loop is Branch Always (BRA).
•
It’s the simplest branch instruction, because it
always branches.
•
We’ll soon study other branches that check a
condition and then, depending on that condition,
may or may not branch.
•
These other branches are often called conditional
branches, while BRA is an unconditional branch.
“Forever” Loop Structure: Example
Flowchart
Program
ABSENTRY Entry
Start
ORG $2000
Load A from $1000
Entry:
Increment A
LDAA $1000
GoHere: INCA
BRA GoHere
END
Review: Addressing Modes
•
The HCS12’s six addressing modes are:
• Inherent
• Immediate
• Direct
• Extended
• Indexed (which has several variations)
• Relative
•
We’ve studied the first four and briefly
looked at the fifth. Now we need to
understand relative addressing mode.
Relative Addressing Mode
•
Relative addressing mode is used only by
branch instructions.
•
In this addressing mode, the opcode is
followed by an offset, which is a two’scomplement number (positive for branching
forward in a program, negative for branching
backwards).
•
Example: In the previous program, BRA GoHere
in assembly language translates into $20 FD in
machine code. The offset, $FD, is −3 in two’s
complement notation.
Using Labels with Branch
Instructions
•
Figuring out the offset can be a tedious
chore.
•
Fortunately, the assembler lets you use
labels instead to specify the branch
destination; then the assembler figures out
the offset.
A Self-Pointing Branch
•
We saw in Lab #2 that BRA * is a selfpointing branch instruction.
•
The assembler treats BRA * as being the
same as the following instruction:
GoHere:
•
BRA GoHere
It’s useful as a way of stopping a program
that has finished its task. Otherwise the
processor would try to continue past the end
of your program, executing whatever
instructions happen to be located in memory
after your program.
A Self-Pointing Branch: Example
Program
ABSENTRY Entry
Start
ORG $2000
Load A from $1000
Entry:
LDAA $1000
GoHere: BRA GoHere
END
Conditional Structure
•Often we want to
check some
condition and then
either perform an
action or skip the
action, depending
on whether the
condition is true or
false.
.
.
.
Yes
Condition?
No
Action
.
.
.
Branch Instructions and the CCR
•
Most branch instructions examine one or
more of the flag bits in the Condition Code
Register (CCR) to decide whether to
continue with the next instruction in memory
or jump to a different instruction.
Simple Branch Instructions
•
The simple branch instructions examine a single
bit in the CCR.
Mnemonic
Function
Condition Checked
(Table from p. 74 of the HCS12 reference manual.)
Repeating an Action Many Times
•Often we want to
perform an action
several times.
The brute-force
way to do this is
by using a
straight-line
program in which
we repeat the
same instruction
the correct
number of times.
Start
Do the action
Do it again
.
.
.
Do it again
End
Brute Force Method: Example
Start
ABSENTRY Entry
Load A from $1000
Increment A
Increment A
Increment A
Increment A
Increment A
Store A to $1001
End
ORG $2000
Entry:
LDAA $1000
INCA
INCA
INCA
INCA
INCA
STAA $1001
END
Counted Loop Structure
Start
•A better way is to
use a counted
loop, as shown
here.
Initialize Counter
Do the action
Decrement Counter
No
Counter
= 0?
Yes
End
Counted Loop Structure: Example
Start
Load A from $1000
Counter=5
ABSENTRY Entry
ORG $2000
Entry: LDAA $1000
LDAB #5 ;Init. Counter
Increment A
Decrement Counter
No
Counter
= 0?
Yes
Store A to $1001
End
Again: INCA
;Do action
DECB ;Dec. Counter
BNE Again ;Counter=0?
STAA $1001
END
Time Delay Loops
•
Counted loops are often used to introduce
time delays. The idea is that we just spin
around and around in a counted loop,
wasting time.
•
Example:
.
.
.
LDAB #255
Again: DECB
BNE Again
.
.
.
;Doing some stuff.
;Waste some time.
;Do more stuff.
Calculating the Time Delay
•
We can calculate the approximate delay by
knowing the microcontroller’s cycle time (in
our case,  41.7 ns) and how many cycles
are required to execute each instruction.
•
Example:
LDAB #255
Again: DECB
BNE Again
•
Number of cycles
1
1
+3
4 × 255 = 1020
1021
Total delay  1021 × 41.7 ns  42.5 µs
How to Get Longer Delays?
•
•
The previous timing loop gave us a delay of
only about 42 µs. Here three ways to get
longer delays:
•
Use a 16-bit register such as Index
Register X instead of the 8-bit
Accumulator B.
•
Place more instructions inside the loop.
•
Use nested loops.
All three techniques are used on the next
slide.
Nested Timing Loops
•
If a single loop doesn’t give us a long
enough delay, we can use nested loops (a
loop inside a loop) to waste even more time!
•
Example:
Loop2:
Loop1:
LDAB #10
LDX #$FFFF
DEX
NOP
BNE Loop1
DECB
BNE Loop2
Inner Loop
Outer Loop
Short Branches
•
In short branch instructions, the offset is an
eight-bit signed number.
•
So the offset can range from 128 to +127.
•
Older microcontrollers only had short branch
instructions, limiting how far away you could
branch.
•
All of the branch instructions we’ve
discussed (and others that we’ll discuss next
week) are short branch instructions. See
next slide.
Short Branch Instructions
(Table from p. 74 of the
HCS12 CPU Reference
Manual.)
Is This a Problem?
•
Is it a problem that the offset can range only
from 128 to +127?
•
Not in short programs, but it can be in long
programs.
.
.
.
BEQ GoHere
.
.
.
GoHere:
STAA $1001
Suppose there are a few
hundred instructions
between the BEQ and the
STAA. That’s too far
away! You’ll get an error
when you try to assemble
the program.
Long Branches
•
The HCS12 also has long branch
instructions, in which the offset is a sixteenbit signed number.
•
So the offset can range from 32,768 to
+32,767, letting us branch to any other
location in the HCS12’s 64K memory space.
•
There’s a long-branch version of each short
branch instruction. See next slide.
Long Branch Instructions
(Table from p. 75 of
the HCS12 CPU
Reference Manual.)
Jump
•
The Jump (JMP) instruction is similar to BRA
or LBRA. It forces the program to jump to a
new instruction by loading a value into the
Program Counter.
•
While BRA and LBRA use relative
addressing mode, JMP uses extended or
indexed addressing.
•
Example: JMP $2050 causes $2050 to be
loaded into the Program Counter, so that the
instruction located at that address will be
executed next.

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