guided instruction

Report
UNPACKING
EXPLICIT INSTRUCTION
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March 6, 2013
ANTICIPATION GUIDE
1.
2.
Pre
Think about your current knowledge of explicit instruction.
In the ‘pre’ column on the left, rate yourself.
3 = Skillfully employed
2 = Regularly employed
1 = Partially employed
0 = Not used at all
Explicit Instruction Components
Post
3 2 1 0
FOCUS LESSONS are almost always done with the whole class and typically lasts 15 minutes or
less. The teacher clearly establishes a purpose and models his/her own thinking.
3 2 1 0
3 2 1 0
GUIDED INSTRUCTION is almost always done with small, purposeful groups, which are
composed based on students’ performance on formative assessments. The groups consist of
students who share a common instructional need that the teacher addresses. The key lies in the
planning.
3 2 1 0
3 2 1 0
COLLABORATIVE LEARNING should be time for students to apply information in novel
situations or to engage in a spiral review of previous knowledge. Negotiating with peers,
discussing ideas and information, or engaging in inquiry with others causes students to use what
they learned during focus lessons and guided instruction.
3 2 1 0
3 2 1 0
INDEPENDENT TASKS should require individual application of information previously taught.
They require good instruction that ensures students have the background knowledge to do so.
These tasks should provide students with opportunities to use their knowledge to produce new
products so they can independently apply information, ideas, content, skills, and strategies in
unique situations.
3 2 1 0
OBJECTIVE
After a demonstration of a Focus
Lesson using modeling teachers will
share their implementation plans.
COMPONENTS OF EXPLICIT INSTRUCTION
Focus Lesson
FOCUS LESSONS – ESTABLISHING THE LESSON’S PURPOSE AND
THEN MODELING YOUR OWN THINKING FOR STUDENTS .
 The teacher establishes the purpose for the lesson.
 Both content and language goals are established.
 The teacher uses “I” statements to model thinking.
 Questioning is used to scaffold instruction, not to interrogate
students.
 The lesson includes a decision frame for when to use the skill or
strategy.
 The lesson builds metacognitive awareness, especially indicators
of success.
 Focus lessons move to guided instruction, not immediately to
independent learning.
QUESTION TO PONDER
(QUOTES FROM BETTER LEARNING)
 “Focus lessons are not intended as a time to ask
students questions. During the focus lesson, the teacher
should model his or her thinking and not interrogate
students about their thinking.”
 How is this approach not a return to the ‘lecture
days’ when the teacher talks and the students
don’t? (One minute talk to shoulder partner.)
 “Focus lessons are also not the time to simply tell students
things. The key to a quality focus lesson is explaining.
…students need an explanation of their teachers’ cognitive and
metacognitive processes.
…people don’t really learn form being told. Learners need
scaffolds and supports to process information.
…as teachers we should continually ask ourselves whether we
are explaining or telling.“
2 KEY FEATURES OF FOCUS LESSONS
1. Establishing purpose for the learning.
2. Model thinking.
Modeling
Metacognitive Awareness
Think-alouds
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
 1 . Name the strategy, skill or task.
 2. State the purpose of the strategy, skill or task.
 3. Explain when the strategy or skill is used.
 4. Use analogies to link prior knowledge to new learning.
 5. Demonstrate how the skill, strategy, or task is completed.
 6. Alert learners about errors to avoid.
 7. Assess the use of the skill.
TEACHING FOR METACOGNITIVE AWARENESS
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
THINK-ALOUDS
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
1. Name the
strategy, skill
or task.
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
2. State the purpose
of the strategy, skill or
task.
The purpose of juggling is to keep
multiple objects moving at the
same time.
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
3. Explain
when the
strategy or
skill is used.
From JFTCK
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
4. Use
analogies
to link prior
knowledge
to new
learning.
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
5. Demonstrate
how the skill, The Drop
strategy, or The Toss
task is
The
Exchange
completed.
The Jug
From JFTCK
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
6. Alert
learners
about errors
to avoid.
Tossing too far
away…leads to
leaning…running
Dropped objects can
roll under furniture
DON’T Keep your
eye on THE ball @#!
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
7. Assess the use of the skill.
Did the juggling do what it was
supposed to?
Are observers impressed?
Did I get a ride?
SUPPORT FOR JUGGLING
Dr. Steve Allen Jr. conducts workshops in
stress management. Not only does he employ
juggling as a major ingredient for relieving
stress, but he adds, "there is something
powerful about repetitive exercises such as
juggling," as they pertain to health.
In addition, Dr. Allen uses juggling to reduce
stress because, "it brings forth the creative
use of silliness,"
MODELING
(FROM BETTER LEARNING)
 1 . Name the strategy, skill or task.
 2. State the purpose of the strategy, skill or task.
 3. Explain when the strategy or skill is used.
 4. Use analogies to link prior knowledge to new learning.
 5. Demonstrate how the skill, strategy, or task is completed.
 6. Alert learners about errors to avoid.
 7. Assess the use of the skill.
HOW WOULD JUGGLING BE DONE WITH THE
OTHER
EXPLICIT INSTRUCTION COMPONENTS???
1.
2.
Pre
Think about your current knowledge of explicit instruction.
In the ‘pre’ column on the left, rate yourself.
3 = Skillfully employed
2 = Regularly employed
1 = Partially employed
0 = Not used at all
Explicit Instruction Components
Post
3 2 1 0
FOCUS LESSONS are almost always done with the whole class and typically lasts 15 minutes or
less. The teacher clearly establishes a purpose and models his/her own thinking.
3 2 1 0
3 2 1 0
GUIDED INSTRUCTION is almost always done with small, purposeful groups, which are
composed based on students’ performance on formative assessments. The groups consist of
students who share a common instructional need that the teacher addresses. The key lies in the
planning.
3 2 1 0
3 2 1 0
COLLABORATIVE LEARNING should be time for students to apply information in novel
situations or to engage in a spiral review of previous knowledge. Negotiating with peers,
discussing ideas and information, or engaging in inquiry with others causes students to use what
they learned during focus lessons and guided instruction.
3 2 1 0
3 2 1 0
INDEPENDENT TASKS should require individual application of information previously taught.
They require good instruction that ensures students have the background knowledge to do so.
These tasks should provide students with opportunities to use their knowledge to produce new
products so they can independently apply information, ideas, content, skills, and strategies in
unique situations.
3 2 1 0
ORDER OF INSTRUCTION
Steve Leinwand, Principal Research
Analyst at the American Institutes for
Research
Says “you do, we do , I do” order is for
Monday and Friday,
“I do, we do, you do” is for Tuesday Thursday
HAPPY JUGGLING!!!!!!!!
For the next part of the
Explicit Instructional Process
please go to 127:
GUIDED INSTRUCTION
with Mac Moore
RESOURCES
 Juggling for the Complete Klutz
By: John Cassidy, B.C. Rimbeaux
Klutz Press / 1994 / Other
 Juggling and Health
 http://www.juggling.org/jw/86/1/health.html
 Juggler’s World
 http://www.juggling.org/jw/87/4/decade.html
 Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey in their book
Better Learning Through Structured Teaching
(ASCD, 2008) from Chapter 2 Focus Lessons:
Establishing Purpose and Modeling.
 http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Juggling/Three_Bal
l_Cascade

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