Slide 0 - South Carolina IB Schools

Report
MYP: now and in the future
IBA Associations
21 February 2013
MYP Now
Education for
11-16 year olds
When you were this age:
• What did you like about school?
• What did you not like about school?
2
Historical Background
of MYP
• began in 1980’s: initiative of International Schools
Association (ISA) known as ISAC
• 1994 taken over by IBO
• since 1994: major curriculum development and
growth
Page 3
What influenced MYP?
4
What influenced the MYP?
UNESCO Learning, The Treasure Within 1996
Simply speaking, the Commission felt that education
throughout life is based upon four pillars:
• learning to know,
• learning to do,
• learning to live together and
• learning to be.
5
What does MYP bring?
Rewards
• Meaningful learning
• Assessment which promotes
learning
• Students
• Rigour and relevance
• Generates a powerful
• Collaborative school
professional learning community
community
• Align with local requirements
• Encourages innovation and
creativity
High expectations
• Teachers
Page 6
MYP around the world
February 2013: 1000 schools (in 90 countries)
IBAEM:
163 schools
AMERICAS:
702 schools
ASIA PACIFIC:
135 schools
7
The MYP programme model
8
Contextual learning
Approaches to
Learning
Community and
Service
Currently five areas of interaction
shape contextual learning in the
MYP
Human Ingenuity
Health and Social
Education
Environment
9
MYP assessment:
Formative and summative
10
Conceptual understanding
Stage 1: Integrate significant concept, area of interaction and unit
question
Area of interaction focus
Significant concept(s)
Which area of interaction will be our focus?
Why have we chosen this?
What are the big ideas? What do we want our
students to retain for years into the future?
Environments: Students will become aware
of their interdependence with the world.
Students will appreciate how they can affect
local ecosystems, and how local
ecosystems can affect them.
Ecosystems can be both fragile and
resilient. With even modest efforts,
disturbed ecosystems can be restored.
MYP unit question
How Tough is Mother Nature?
11
Piece of literary
fiction
Presentation of a
business,
management or
organizational
plan
Invention or specially
designed
object/system
Written piece of
work on special
topic
Types of PP
Presentation of a new
student/community
organization
Original science
experiment
Original
work of art
Presentation of
a special event
12
What do you think?
If you had been in the MYP, how might this have
made a difference in how you experienced your
11-16 schooling?
13
So why change it?
14
MYP: the next chapter
Big picture
MYP: the next chapter
challenges...
MYP: the next chapter
solutions...
Subject
Assessment
model =
Recognition
Facilitate
improved
integration
Innovative
concept based
assessment
Contextual
learning
areas
group
flexibility
MYP4-5
New PP
moderation
= global
consistency
EVOLUTIONARY and
INNOVATIVE
Development of MYP
for students
aged 11-16
Concept based
curriculum
Core to
continuum
Greater
guidance
and support
Innovative
eAssessment
options
Emphasis on
‘Approaches
to Learning’
MYP: the next chapter
MYP, current programme model
MYP, first programme model
Embrace the future by valuing the past
MYP: the next chapter
Concepts
Contexts
ATL
Unit plans
People travel to wonder at the height of
mountains, at the huge waves of the sea,
at the long courses of rivers, at the vast
compass of the ocean, at the circular
motion of the star; and they pas by
themselves without wondering.
St. Augustine
MYP: the next chapter
Increased student engagement
MYP concept based curriculum:
Encourages learning and deep
understanding of important
concepts
Increases motivation for learning,
students develop attributes of the
Learner Profile to become lifelong
learners
Provides better alignment across all
IB programmes
Builds on conceptual framework in
PYP and is best preparation for
DP/IBCC and further education
MYP: the next chapter
Approaches to Learning (ATL)
ATL develops the learning skills to best prepare for
success in DP, IBCC and beyond
ATL provides greater alignment between PYP,
MYP, DP and IBCC
MYP: the next chapter
Concept based curriculum
MYP: the next chapter is better aligned
with PYP, DP and the IBCC
MYP: the next chapter
Increased teacher support
Concepts in guides – greater guidance and support for teachers
TSM’s – greater guidance for teachers using new
media
Draft guides piloted during 2011/12
Existing MYP Schools, workshop leaders and
teachers will be guided, step by step,
throughout the process
MYP Unit plans
• CONNECT: How are the ideas and information
presented CONNECTED to what you already know?
• EXTEND: What new ideas did you get that EXTENDED
or pushed your thinking in new directions?
• CHALLENGE: What is still CHALLENGING or confusing
to you to get your mind around? What questions,
wonderings or puzzles do you know have?
MYP: the next chapter
Preparation for DP
MYP preparing for DP:
2012 data
2012
Result DP
All candidates
MYP
Pass rate
78.4%
83.8%
Students
Achieving 40+
% gaining
bilingual diploma
6.6%
7.4%
24.5%
40.0%
MYP preparing for DP:
2012 data
Total score distribution 2012
35.00%
30.00%
25.00%
20.00%
All candidates
Ex MYP
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
<24
24-29
30-34
35-39
40-45
MYP preparing for DP:
EE in 2012
Extended Essay - MYP vs All
45.00%
40.00%
35.00%
30.00%
25.00%
MYP
20.00%
All candidates
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
A
B
C
D
E
Aligning MYP-DP:
Future models
International Schools’
Assessment (ISA)
• Assesses reading, mathematics and writing (narrative
and opinion).
• Assesses grades 3 to 10.
• A mix of multiple-choice and open-ended questions in
reading and mathematics, and two essays in writing.
• Aligned with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) Programme for
International Student Assessment (PISA) construct.
Performance of
IB and non-IB students
IB compared to non-IB student ISA scores: Phase II
10
Exp.
Writing
9
Nar.
Writing
Grades
8
7
Reading
6
Math
5
4
3
-0.2
-0.1
0
0.1
0.2
Effect size
0.3
0.4
0.5
MYP: the next chapter
Assessment
Subject group flexibility
Collaborative project
Transition
MYP: the next chapter
Assessment model
MYP : the next chapter
Assessment
MYP : the next chapter
Assessment
MYP: the next chapter
Timeline
MYP: the next chapter
Piloting the subject group guides
MYP: the next chapter
Subject choice
Subject group flexibility –possibility for student
choice with a minimum of six subject groups in the
last two years
Ease of implementation for schools working in
state or national systems
Creates opportunities ahead of DP/IBCC for
students to specialize – with additional languages,
sciences, arts or vocational courses
MYP: the next chapter
Changes to subject groups
Current MYP
Mathematics
MYP : the next
chapter, teaching
from
September 2014
Arts
Sciences
Language A
Language B
Humanities
Language
and
literature
Language
acquisition
Individuals
and
societies
Mathematics
Arts
Personal
Project
Technology
Physical
Education
Design
Physical and
health
education
Sciences
Personal
Project
MYP: the next chapter
Professional Development
IB Professional Development is the best preparation for MYP: the next
chapter
Category 1 and 2 workshops scheduled to match November prepublications of subject area guides and MYP: the next chapter,
Principles into Practice
New category 3 workshops offered to schools in 2014, will include
•Approaches to learning
•Socio-emotional learning
•A trilogy of assessment workshops
MYP: the next chapter
Transition
MYP: the next chapter
Transition timeline - 2013
• MYP Coordinators Handbook includes new rule for subject group flexibility in MYP4-5
August
September
• OCC: Pre-published draft unit planner
• OCC: Publication of teacher support material for approaches to learning, inquiry and service
October
• OCC: Pre-published draft guides for all subjects, personal projects and new interdisciplinary
guide
November
OCC: Transition document for schools indicating timeline for implementation of the new
requirements from September 2014
MYP: the next chapter
Transition timeline - 2014
January
• OCC: Publication of revised Programme standards and practices and Guide to
programme evaluation and self-study questionnaire
• OCC: pre-Published draft MYP: from principles into practice
• Revised applications for candidacy and authorization available online
February
• Last submission for subject moderation northern hemisphere
April
OCC: Publication of subject guides, personal project guide, new interdisciplinary
guide and MYP: From principles into practice
May
• Registration of students for compulsory personal project moderation and optional
MYP eAssessment in June 2015
October
• OCC: Publication of teacher support material for subject guides and personal
project
December
MYP: the next chapter
The essentials...
MYP: the next chapter will launch in schools in
September 2014
First assessment will occur in June 2015
Existing MYP schools, workshop leaders and teachers
will be guided, step by step, throughout the process
IB Professional Development is the best preparation for
MYP: the next chapter teaching
MYP: the next chapter
Keep up to date
Online curriculum centre (OCC)
find and post messages about the MYP using:
@IBMYP
for instant updates and MYP news
Questions?
47
September 2012
Performance comparison between
IB school students (PYP and MYP)
and non-IB school students on the
International Schools’
Assessment (ISA)
Phases I and II
Australian Council for Educational Research
2010 and 2012
Study design
• Phase I: 2007/2008/2009 ISA sittings
•
•
•
•
IB students = 23,515; non-IB students = 14,317
Subject and regional analyses on four ISA assessment areas
PISA benchmark analysis
Top-performing IB schools analysis
• Phase II: 2010/2011 ISA sittings
•
•
>28,000 students, 121 schools, 50 countries
Replication of phase I using more recent data, with closer examination of
particular findings:
•the impact of number of programmes and length of authorization
•
•
•
Country analysis in Asia (new)
Multilevel analysis of school variance (new)
Student questionnaires (grades 5, 6, 8 and 9) (new)
International Schools’ Assessment
(ISA)
• Assesses reading, mathematics and writing (narrative and
opinion).
• Assesses grades 3 to 10.
• A mix of multiple-choice and open-ended questions in reading
and mathematics, and two essays in writing.
• Aligned with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development’s (OECD) Programme for International Student
Assessment (PISA) construct.
• Student well-being questionnaires (grades 5, 6, 8 and 9)
(Phase II)
•
Four primary-year dimensions; seven secondary-year dimensions.
Key findings
• On a global level, PYP and MYP students outperformed non-IB
students in all four assessment areas in majority of grades.
•
Strongest effects noted in grade 10.
• Grades 9 and 10 IB students averaged significantly higher than
OECD countries’ PISA means in math and reading.
• Less variation between IB schools than non-IB schools.
• High proportions of agreement among PYP and MYP students
across all dimensions of the student well-being questionnaires.
•
•
89% of grade 5 students agreed their schools provided a supportive
learning environment, and school experiences were useful preparation
for other aspects of life.
About 84% of grade 9 students agreed they were engaged with their
work and challenged to attempt more complex problems.
Performance of IB and non-IB
students
IB compared to non-IB student ISA scores: Phase II
10
Exp.
Writing
9
Nar.
Writing
Grades
8
7
Reading
6
Math
5
4
3
-0.2
-0.1
0
0.1
0.2
Effect size
0.3
0.4
0.5
IB grade 9/10 students on PISA
benchmark
Reading
9
10

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