Now - Workforce Solutions

Report
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INTRODUCTION
SCOPE
TIME MANAGEMENT
COST MANAGEMENT
QUALITY MANAGEMENT
HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT
RISKMANAGEMENT
PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT
INTEGRATION
ASSESMENT
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 Renewable
energy is
energy which comes from
natural resources such as
sunlight, wind, water,
biomass tides, and
geothermal heat, which
are renewable (naturally
replenished). Wikipedia
4
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Advantages of
Renewable Energy
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We can use it repeatedly
without depleting it
(Infinite).
No contribution to global
warming
No polluting emissions
Low cost applications
when counting all costs
Saving on health and its
costs
Job creation
Green Urban
development
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Sunlight

Solar energy is the
energy derived from the
sun through the form of
solar radiation. Solar
powered electrical
generation relies on
photovoltaic's and heat
engines. A partial list of
other solar applications
includes space heating
and cooling through
solar architecture,
daylighting, solar hot
water, solar cooking,
and high temperature
process heat for
industrial purposes.
Wikipedia
6

Industry terms

Amorphous
 A type of PV solar cell. Unlike multicrystalline and
monocrystalline cells (see below), amorphous panels are not
made from interconnected solar cells made from expensive
crystalline silicon.
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Active solar
 Using a collector, e.g. a solar panel, to capture the sun's
energy and use it to heat water or convert it to electricity.
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Drain back system
 A solar water heating system where the water inside the
solar panel drains into a small back bottle when the pump
switches off. This protects the system against damage due to
boiling and freezing, without the use of antifreeze.
WWW.WHICH.CO.UK
7
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Industry terms
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Evacuated tubes
 A type of solar water heating panel. Evacuated glass tubes collect the
sun's energy and heat water running through a container at the top
of the tubes.
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Passive solar
 Capturing the sun's energy without a panel or collector, e.g. through
large south-facing windows, and minimizing heat loss through
insulation.
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Photovoltaic's, PV
 PV cells are thin layers of semi-conducting material (usually silicon).
Electrical charges are generated when the silicon is exposed to light
which can be conducted away as direct current.
WWW.WHICH.CO.UK
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Industry terms
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Solar tiles
 Use the same technology as photovoltaic cells, but are smaller and
narrower than large PV panels and look like roof tiles.
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Solar water heating
 Water is pumped through a solar panel and heated by solar energy.
The heated water then flows through a heat exchanger, warming the
water in your hot water cylinder.
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Monocrystalline silicon cells
 The most efficient and expensive PV cell. Cut from single crystals of
silicon, this system can harness around 15% of the sun's energy that
falls on it.
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Multicrystalline silicon cells
 PV system made from silicon cut into wafers. It’s slightly less
efficient than monocrystalline cells but also slightly cheaper
WWW.WHICH.CO.UK
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
PV SOLAR SYSTEM COMPONENTS
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Solar Panels /tiles- the essential component that changes
light into electricity
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Inverters - the component that transforms AC into DC.
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Stand Alone Inverters – Utilized in independent solar
energy systems, any energy system that is "off grid."
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Charge Controllers - controls the energy flow and protects
your battery
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Solar Batteries - "tolerant" batteries that survive frequent
charging and discharging
www.thesolarguide.com
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PV SOLAR SYSTEM COMPONENTS
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Grid tie Inverters (aka "Synchronous Inverters") - an inverter
that allows excess electricity to flow back into the grid.
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Solar panel mounts - the hardware that holds your panel in
optimum basking position
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Solar panel tracking - adjusting your panels for optimum sun
exposure
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Metering – To provide indication of system performance
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Other Components – Electrical Wiring, Utility switch
www.thesolarguide.com
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SOLAR WATER HEATING SYSTEMS
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Solar Water Heaters—also called solar domestic hot
water systems—can be a cost-effective way to
generate hot water for your home. www.solardirect.com
 Closed-Loop Active Systems - Indirect Circulation
 Suitable for single and multiple solar heating application
systems. Suitable for areas with questionable water quality
and all climate conditions. Preferred option for extremely
cold areas.
 Open-Loop Active Systems - Direct Circulation
 Open Loop Systems are suitable for single application
domestic hot water (DHW) systems, in mild and moderate
climates where there is no risk of freezing.
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SOLAR WATER HEATING SYSTEM
COMPONENTS
Flat-plate collector
Glazed flat-plate collectors are insulated, weatherproofed
boxes that contain a dark absorber plate under one or
more glass or plastic (polymer) covers. Unglazed flat-plate
collectors—typically used for solar pool heating—have a
dark absorber plate, made of metal or polymer, without a
cover or enclosure.
 Evacuated-tube solar collectors
They feature parallel rows of transparent glass tubes. Each
tube contains a glass outer tube and metal absorber tube
attached to a fin. The fin's coating absorbs solar energy but
inhibits radioactive heat loss. These collectors are used
more frequently for commercial applications
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Wind

Airflows can be
used to run wind
turbines. Wind
Turbines are
used to generate
electrical energy
with a
production
capacity range of
600kw-5MW.
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Water
Energy in water can be harnessed and used. Since
water is about 800 times denser than air, even a
slow flowing stream of water, or moderate sea
swell, can yield considerable amounts of energy.
There are many forms of water energy:
 Hydro electricity
 Ocean Energy
 Marine current power
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Geothermal Energy
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Geothermal energy is energy obtained by tapping
the heat of the earth itself, both from kilometers deep
into the Earth's crust or from some meters in
geothermal heat pump.
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Renewable Energy
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Biomass
 Biomass is a very
versatile form of
renewable energy.
Biomass power plants
burn biomass fuel in
boilers to heat water and
turn a steam turbine to
create electricity.
Biomass fuel is
everything from wood
to landfill trash, which is
currently being used to
convert into methane for
the production of dry
natural gas.
www.greenenergy.com
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Biomass Flow chart
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Biomass Advantages
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Biomass can be used to make a variety of fuels to
generate electricity
Biomass is used for the production of chemical
products
Biomass waste can help in reducing disposal costs
Biomass waste can extend the life of landfills
Biomass Disadvantages

Generates air pollution
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Weatherization or weatherproofing is the
practice of protecting a building and its
interior from the elements, particularly
from sunlight, precipitation, and wind,
and of modifying a building to reduce
energy consumption and optimize energy
efficiency. www.wikipedia.com
 Primarily reduces convective heat flow
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WEATHERIZATION PROCEDURES
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Sealing bypasses (cracks, gaps, holes), especially
around doors, windows, pipes and wiring that
penetrate the ceiling and floor
Sealing recessed lighting fixtures
Sealing air ducts, which can account for 20% of heat
loss, using fiber-reinforced mastic
Installing/replacing dampers in exhaust ducts
Protecting pipes from corrosion and freezing.
Installing footing drains, foundation waterproofing
membranes, interior perimeter drains, sump pump,
gutters, downspout extensions, etc. to protect a
building from both surface water and ground water.
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WEATHERIZATION PROCEDURES
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Providing proper ventilation to unconditioned spaces to
prevent of condensation.
Installing roofing, building wrap, siding, flashing,
skylights or solar tubes and making sure they are in good
condition on an existing building.
Installing insulation in walls, floors, and ceilings, around
ducts and pipes, around water heaters, and near the
foundation and sill.
Installing storm doors and storm windows.
Replacing old drafty doors with tightly sealing, foam-core
doors.
Replacing older windows with low-energy, double-glazed
windows.
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Weatherization operations manager
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A weatherization operations manager may be responsible
for conducting energy audits, provide weatherization and
remediation services such as "healthy homes" testing,
install solar energy systems, produce bio-fuels and
deliver environmental education to the public for more
energy efficient homes and businesses.
Green Carpenter
Being a green carpenter can be realized through
prioritizing green building measures.
 Utilize renewable sustainable resources
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GREEN JARGON
3R's - In the world of green, this standard for Reduce, Reuse,
Recycle
Biodegradable - A material that breaks down with the assistance
of microorganisms
bioaccumulation - Where toxins taken up by plants and animals
from their environment become concentrated in body tissues.
Biodiversity - The scope of different living things within an area the plants, animals, fungi and microorganisms and the ecosystems
they are part of.
Degradable - A material that breaks down through chemical
reactions rather than through the activity of microorganisms
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GREEN JARGON
Blackwater - Water effluent containing fecal matter and urine - i.e.
sewage
carbon footprint - the amount of carbon dioxide emissions created
by a person or industry
CFL - Compact Fluorescent Lamp - an energy saving light bulb
rapidly replacing traditional incandescent bulbs.
climate change - Most commonly means a rapid variation in the
Earth's global climate due to anthropogenic (human) activity
induced global warming
Co2 - chemical shorthand for carbon dioxide - the greenhouse gas
that is contributing greatly to global warming
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GREEN JARGON
fossil fuel - any hydrocarbon deposit used for fuel
such as oil, coal and natural gas. These are called
"fossil" fuels as it takes many years for them to be
created in the natural environment.
greenhouse gas - Any of a number of atmospheric
gases that contribute to the greenhouse (warming)
effect of our atmosphere
Greywater - Effluent from the shower, bath, sinks and
washing machines. Does not contain sewage
Ecosystem - The physical and biological elements of an
area co-existing to form a self supporting environment.
Emissions - Usually used in reference to exhaust or
greenhouse gases or carbon dioxide production as a
byproduct of human activity.
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Improved Communication
Ability to define and control project scope
Ability to identify, monitor, and track
milestone
Accurate projection of resource requirements
Improved assessment and mitigation of project
risk events
Prioritization of functional and project
activities
Identification of problem areas
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An endeavor undertaken to create Renewable
Energy services.

Solar Panel Installation
Urban Housing retrofit energy systems
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Windmill Installation and Repair
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The application of Knowledge, skills,
tools, and techniques to project activities
of a Renewable Energy Project in order
to meet the project requirements
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SCOPE
Process to identify all and
only work required to
complete the project
QUALITY
Measure of
performance
TIME
Process to identify timeline
for project completion
COST Project Budget
RISK
Probability Analysis
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•CUSTOMER
•END USERS
•SHAREHOLDERS
•SUPPORT AND MAINTENANCE
DEPARTMENTS
•CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE
•TEAM MEMBERS
•SPONSORS
•FUNCTIONAL MANAGERS
•PROJECT MANAGERS
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Knowledge
 What the project manager knows about
project management
Performance
 Completion of the project requirements
within the established Time, Cost and Scope
of the Project
Personal
 Self mastery
 Ethical
 Leadership
 Show Initiative
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Laying out The Project Workflow And Plan
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Develop assessment/Measuring Plan
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Establishing communication Lines on all levels
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Develop contingency plan
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Executing the plan
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Management by walking around
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CAPM-Certified Associates Project Manager
PMP-Project Manager Professional
Sign up for
test
On Job
experience
Pass Exam
Application
Process
CAPM
Hours
PMP
38
MISSION
WHAT SERVICE TO PROVIDE
VISION
OUTCOME
FUTURE PLANS OF THE
PROJECT
OBJECTIVES
OPERATIONS OF THE
STRATEGIES
PROJECT
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WHAT SERVICE TO PROVIDE
FUTURE PLANS OF THE
PROJECT
OUTCOME
OPERATIONS OF THE
PROJECT
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
“Project scope management includes the
processes required to ensure that the project
includes all the work required, and only the
work required to complete the project
successfully.” PMBOK P.103
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Collect Requirements
Define Scope
Create WBS
Verify Scope
Control Scope
SCOPE: Developing a detailed description of the
project and product.
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“The process of defining and documenting
stakeholders needs to meet the project
objectives.”PMBOK P.105
Project Charter – High level project requirements
 Stakeholder Register – Stakeholders who can contribute to project

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Tools
 Interviews
 Focus Groups
 Facilitated Workshops
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Time
Cost
Quality
Resources
Risk
Technology
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SCOPE
Initiating
Planning
Executing
Monitoring
and
Controlling
1. Collect Requirements
1. Verify Scope
2. Define Scope
2. Control Scope
Closing
3. Create WBS
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1.Collect Requirements
1.“The Process of defining and documenting
stakeholders needs to meet the project objectives.”
2.Define Scope
2.“Developing a detailed description of the project and
product.”PMBOK P.103
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3.
Work Break Down Station
1. “Subdividing the major project deliverables and
project work into smaller, more manageable
components.”
1A.Verify Scope
1. Completion of all and only scope requirements.
2A. Control Scope (Risk)
2.a A contingency plan due to the probability
of negative events to the project
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“Process of formulizing acceptance of the completed project
deliverables.” PMBOK P.123
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Tools & Techniques
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Inputs
 Project management plan
 Requires Documentation
 Requires traceability matrix
 Validated deliverables
Inspection
Outputs
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Accepted Deliverables
Change Request
Project document updates
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“The process of monitoring the status of the process and product scope and
managing changes to the scope baseline.”PMBOK P.125
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Inputs
 Project Management Plan
 Work Performance
 Requirements
 Requirements Traceability
 Organizational Process
Tools & Techniques
 Variance Analysis
Outputs
 Work Performance
 Organizational Process
 Change Request
 Project Management Plan
 Project document updates
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Create Scope
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“Project Time Management-Includes the
processes required to complete the project.”
PMBOK P.65
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Define Activities
Sequence Activities
Estimate Activity Resource
Estimate Activity Durations
Develop Schedule
Control Schedule
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Time
Initiating
Planning
Executing
•
Activity Definition
•
Activity Sequencing
•
Activity Duration
Estimating
•
Schedule Development
Monitoring
and
Controlling
Closing
Schedule Control
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Activity Definition
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The process of identifying the specific actions to be
performed to produce the project deliverables.
Activity Sequencing
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The process of identifying and documenting
relationships among project activities
There are four types of Activity sequencing models
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Start to Start
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Finish to finish
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One task must be complete for the following task
to be complete
Start to Finish
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Task of the project can be started at the same time
A task must be complete for another task to finish
Finish to Start
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One task must be complete for another to start
56
Start
Task A
Task B
Task C
Task E
Task D
Task F
Finish
Task G
57
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Mandatory (Hard Logic)
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Discretionary(Soft Logic)
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Inherent in the nature of the work being done
Defined by the project management team
External
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Involve a relationship between project activities and
non-project activities
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Activity Duration Estimating – The process of
approximating the number of work periods it
will take to complete individual activities
with estimate resources. PMBOK p.129
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Schedule development – The process of
analyzing activity sequences, durations
resources requirements, and schedule
constraints to create the project schedule.
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Critical Path Method (CPM)
Graphical Evaluation & Review Technique (GERT)
Program Evaluation & Review Technique (PERT)
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TIME MANAGEMENT
Project Title
Project Sponsor
Objective
Work Break Down Structure
Gantt Chart
Network Diagram
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 The
processes involved in
planning, estimating,
budgeting, and controlling
costs so that the project can be
completed within the
approved budget.
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Cost
Initiating
Planning
COST ESTIMATING
Executing
Monitoring
and
Controlling
Closing
COST CONTROL
COST BUDGETTING
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Life cycle costing
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Opportunity cost
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Cost of next best alternative
Value engineering
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Start to Finish
Optimizing costs vs. benefits
Sunk costs
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Spent funds
65
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Payback period analysis
Cost benefit analysis (BCR)
Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) Analysis
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Future Value (FV)
Present Value (PV)
Net Present Value (NPV)
Internal rate of return(IRR)
Return on Investment(ROI)
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Earned Value Management – Key Terms

Planned Value (PV) – Budgeted cost for the work
scheduled to be completed on an activity or WBS
component up to a given point in time.

Earned Value (EV) – Budgeted amount for the work
actually completed on the schedule activity or WBS
component during a given time period.

Actual Cost (AC) – Total cost incurred in accomplishing
work on the schedule activity or WBS component during
a given time period.
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Approximation of the cost of the resources
needed to complete each schedule activity.
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Considers possible causes for variation, including
risk
Includes identifying and considering cost
alternatives
May be expressed in currency
A quantitative assessment of all likely cost
Cost Vs. ‘Price’ perspective
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Estimate accuracy
Always provide a range and not a single
number
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Rough Order Magnitude (ROM) +/- 50%
Definitive Estimates (Budget) +/- 10%
Association for the advancement of cost engineering
(AACE)
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Include all resources
Labor
 Materials
 Equipment
 Services
 Facilities
 Special categories

 Inflation allowance
 Contingency costs
 Performance penalties
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Considerations

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Resource performance (availability/efficiency)
Learning curve – As cost rise, cost per unit drops
Law of diminishing returns – As total output
increases, per-individual-productivity drops
71
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Aggregating the estimated costs of individual
schedule activities or work packages to
establish a total cost baseline for measuring
project performance.
Base line-a time-phased budget
Projects may have multiple baselines
Budget vs. Estimate vs. Plan
72
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Influencing the factors which create changes
to the cost baseline to ensure that the changes
are beneficial.
Determining that a cost baseline has changed
Managing the actual changes when and if
they occur
Recording and communicating cost variances
73
TIME MANAGEMENT
Project Title
Project Sponsor
Objective
Cost Estimates
Time Phased Budget
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TIME MANAGEMENT
Project Title
Project Sponsor
Objective
Planned Value
Cost Control Chart
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
“The processes include all the activities of the
performing organization that determine the
quality policies, objectives, and responsibilities
so that the project will satisfy the needs for
which it was undertaken.”PMBOK P.189
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Plan Quality
Perform Quality Assurance
Perform Quality Control
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
“Identifying quality requirements and/or
standards for the project and product,
documenting how the project will demonstrate
compliance.” PMBOK
Quality Management Plan

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
Defines how the organization addresses the issue of
quality. This policy covers both intention and direction.
Organizational Structure
Responsibilities
Processes and Procedures
Resources needed to implement
79
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Quality Assurance System
Audit System
 Measures of Performance
 Tangible Data
 Implement Process control systems
 Corrective action plan

80

Variation-normal/common/random.
Found throughout the entire system
 Accounts for 85% of variation
 Management’s responsibility to correct
 Requires investigation and elimination or
incorporation


Abnormal
 Specific to material, machinery, manpower, or method.
 Accounts for only 15% of variation
 Location supervisor or worker should correct
81
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Statistical Terms
Mean – The average value of a set of numbers
 Median – The middle value
 Mode – The most commonly occurring value
 Variance – The difference between what is expected
to happen and what actually occurs
 Standard Deviation – The measure of the dispersion
or variation in a distribution

83
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Cause and Effect Diagram



Ishikawa Diagram
Fishbone Diagram
Reasons for use
 Identifies root causes of problems
 Analysis of problems
84
85
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A flow chart is a
graphical
representation of
a process
Identifies
potential problem
areas
Used in process
improvement
86
Pareto chart is a specific type of histogram,
ordered by frequency of occurrence.
87
TIME MANAGEMENT
Project Title
Project Sponsor
Objective
Quality Assurance
Training
Recruiting
Audits
Quality Checklist
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89

What is Human Resource Management

“HR Management includes the processes that
organize, manage and lead the project team.”PMBOK
P.199
90
HUMAN RESOURCES
Initiating
Planning
HUMAN RESOURCE
PLANNING
Executing
ACQUIRE
PROJECT TEAM
Monitoring
and
Controlling
Closing
MANAGE
PROJECT TEAM
DEVELOP
PROJECT TEAM
91
 “The
process of identifying
and documenting project
roles, responsibilities, and
creating a staffing
management plan.”
PMBOK P.215
92
A Responsibility Assignment Matrix (RAM), (also
known as RACI matrix or Linear Responsibility
Chart (LRC)), describes the participation by various
roles in completing tasks or deliverables for a
project. It is especially useful in clarifying roles and
responsibilities in cross-functional/departmental
projects and processes. [wikipedia
93
The resource histogram is a tool that is often used by
the project management team as a means of
providing a visual representation to the team and
to all of those interested parties. Specifically
speaking, the resource histogram is specifically a
bar chart that is used for the purposes of
displaying the specific amounts of time that a
particular resource is scheduled to be worked on
over a predetermined and specific time period.
Resource histograms may also contain the
comparative feature of resource availability, used
for comparison on for purposes of contrast. wikipedia
94
95
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Acquire


“The process of confining human resource
availability and obtaining the team necessary to
complete the project” PMBOK P.215
Develop

“Improving the competencies, team interaction, and
the overall team environment to enhance project
performance.” PMBOK P.215
96
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Plan for Team Building




Negotiate for Team Members



Who-Project roles & responsibilities
What-The project goals and objectives
When-Project schedules
Because of the potential to contribute expertise
Because of their potential to be effective team players
Organize the Team


Work authorizations for each item on the WBS
Responsibility
97
An organizational chart of a project usually shows the
managers and sub-workers who make up the project.
98
Team building: The process of getting a group of
diverse individuals to work together effectively
as a unit.




Improve overall performance
Manage conflicts
Establish working relationships
Team building is a project life process
99

Effective Team Development
Reliability
 Co-operation
 Helpfulness
 Knowledge sharing
 Accountability
 Interdependent
 Moderate levels of competition and conflict

100
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Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs


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

A Theory of Human Motivation
Physiological Needs
Safety Needs
Need of Love, affection, and belonging
Need of Esteem
Need of Self Actualization
101
102
McGregor’s Theory of X and Y
Theory X
 Employees are inherently lazy
 Workers need to be closely supervised
 Control systems need to be established
 Workers will avoid responsibility
 Incentive program needs to be created
 Hierarchal structure needs to be created
103
McGregor’s Theory of X and Y
Theory Y
 Employees are Ambitious
 Workers are self motivated
 They have creative problem solving skills
 Talents are underused
 Satisfaction from doing a good job is
motivation
 Positive set of beliefs about workers

104

“Tracking team member performance,
providing feedback, resolving issues, and
managing changes to optimize project
performance.”

What is reported
 Objectives
 Skill Development
 Team Work
105
Project Title
Project Sponsor
Objective
Organization Structure
Responsibility Matrix
106
107

“The processes required to ensure timely
and appropriate generation, collection,
distribution, storage, retrieval and
ultimate disposition of project
information.” PMBOK P.243





Identity Stakeholders
Plan Communications
Distribute Information
Manage Stake-Holder Expectations
Report Performance
108
COMMUNICATIONS
Initiating
Planning
COMMUNICATIONS
PLANNING
Executing
INFORMATION
DISTRIBUTION
Monitoring
and
Controlling
Closing
PERFORMANCE
REPORTING
MANAGE
STACKHOLDERS
109

We retain and/absorb
Reading-10%
 Hearing-20%
 Read and Hear-30%
 Through Discusion-50%
 Experience-80%
 What we teach to others

110




90% of a project manager’s job
Affects every part of a project
Can make or break a project
Communication to Performance
relationship
111




Now-50%
Two days duration-25%
Seven days duration-10%
Where we gain communication
 From words-7%
 From Tone-38%
 From non-verbal cues-55%
112
The communications model is made up of three
key parts; Sender, Message, and Receiver
113

Who is the audience






What is their job
What do they do
What do they know
What info do they need
What are their deliverable
Reaction to message sent
Active
Decision makers, supporters, and workers
Passive
Information and Entertainment Seekers
114
•Objective Setting
•Up-Front Planning
•Project Organization
•Key Staffing
•Master Plan
•Policies
•Monitoring
Execution
•Priority-Setting
•Conflict Resolution
•Executive-Client
Contact
Project
Manager
Project
Sponsor
Project Tem
115

Communication lines directly related to
people


People increase Communications lines increase
Communications Lines Formula
N(N-1)/2
 N-Number of people

116
Project
Manager
117

Performance Reporting – Involves collecting
and disseminating information in order to
provide stakeholders with information about
how resources are being used to achieve
project objectives. PMBOk P.266



Status Reporting – Describing where the projects
stand now
Progress Reporting – Describing what the project
team has accomplish
Forecasting – Predicting future project status and
progress
118
119
120

COMPONENTS
Plan Risk Management
 Identify Risk
 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis
 Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis
 Plan Risk Response
 Monitor and Control Risks

121
Risk
Initiating
Planning
Executing
RISK MGMT PLANNING
RISK IDENTIFICATION
Monitoring
and
Controlling
Closing
RISK MONITORING
AND CONTROL
QUALIATIVE RISK ANALYSIS
QUANTITTATIVE RISK ANALYSIS
RISK RESPONSE PLANNING
122

“Process of defining the risk management
activities of the project.”
Utilize organization charts
 Organization risk tolerance
 Output of scope
 Risk Categories
 Identify communication on all levels

123


“The process of determining which risks may affect
the project and documenting their characteristics.”
 Information Gathering Techniques
 Brainstorming
 Strength, Weaknesses, opportunities, and threats
(SWOT) analysis.
Diagramming Techniques


Cause and effect diagrams – “Fishbone”
Flowcharts
124


Qualitative
The process of prioritizing risk for further analysis or
action by assessing and combining their probability
of occurrence and impact.



Focus on high priority
Risk Probability and Impact Assessment
Quantitative
 “The process of numerically analyzing the effects
of identified risk on overall project objectives.”
 Decision tree analysis
 Quantify possible outcomes and their probabilities
125
126
Probability Risk Score = P x I
Rare
Catastrophic
0.05
0.1
0.2
0.4
0.8
0.9
0.05
0.09
0.18
0.12
0.08
0.7
0.04
0.06
0.28
0.56
0.5
0.03
0.05
0.10
0.20
0.80
0.3
0.008
0.03
0.06
0.12
0.24
0.1
0.005
0.01
0.02
0.04
0.08
127



“The process of developing options and
actions to enhance opportunities and to
reduce threats to project objectives.” PMBOK P.301
Identifies risk owner
Responds by priority, with modification to
resources and activities in the budget,
schedule, and project management plan.
128



Strategies for negative risks or threats
Mitigate – seeks to reduce the probability
and/or impact of the risk
Strategy for both threats and opportunities
129

“The process of implementing risk
response the plans, tracking identified
risks, monitoring residual risk, identifying
new risks, and evaluating risk process
effectiveness throughout the project.” PMBOK
P.308
130
Project Title
Project Sponsor
Objective
Risk Plan
Risk
Probability Impact
Wieghted
Responsible Mitigation
131
132

“Includes the processes necessary to purchase or
acquire products, services, or results needed from
outside the project team.”PMBOK p.313

Includes
 Plan Procurements – The process of documenting project
purchasing decisions.
 Conduct Procurements – The process of obtaining seller
responses.
 Administrator Procurements – The process of managing
procurement relationships
 Close Procurements – The process of completing each
project procurement.
133




Seller manage work as project if;
Identify Stakeholders
Contract to satisfy the scope requirements
Class Exercise


Class is the buyer
Seller is external
134
PROCUREMENT
Initiating
Planning
Executing
PLAN PURCHASING &
ACQUISITIONS
Monitoring
and
Controlling
Closing
CONTRACT
CONTRACT
ADMINISTRATION
CLOSURE
PLAN CONTRACTING
REQUEST SELLER
RESPONSES
SELECT SELLER
135
Plan Procurement
 “The process of Documenting
project purchasing decisions,
specifying the approach and
identifying potential sellers.”

PMBOK



Seller Selection Process
Risk assessment/Plan Development
Contract Type review
136


Conduct Procurement
Receives bids/proposals and applies
evaluation criteria to select one or more
sellers.
Seller Rating systems
 Screening systems
 Weighting Systems
 Subject matter experts Judgment

137


Fixed Price (FP or FFP - "firm fixed price") also called
"Lump Sum"
The simplest type of contract. The owner specifies the
work and the contractor gives a price. In this case the
contractor assumes almost all of the risk and as a result
reaps whatever profit there is. Fixed price contracts are
often used in governmental contracting as they give an
easy way to compare competitive bids and to budget
for the work as all the uncertainty in actual price
becomes the responsibility of the contractor. Zo-d.com



Not the cheapest form
Change orders for unforeseen changes
Extension of the delegation process
138

Cost Plus Fixed Fee (CPFF or sometimes just
Cost Plus)


This type of contract shifts most of the risk to the
owner, but also allows the owner a high degree of
flexibility. The contractor under this form of contract
has profit at risk and will seek to minimize
cost/duration to return a higher proportional profit
margin.
The "fixed fee" is typically a percentage of estimated
costs and the contractor is reimbursed for other
allowable costs. The difference between CPFF and
CPPC is that for fixed fee, the total amount of the fee
is decided in advance based on estimates. ZO-D.COM
139



Cost Plus Incentive Fee (CPIF)
 This type of contract uses an incentive fee for motivating better performance
than you would get with percentage or fixed fee. In addition to a fee, an
incentive is paid for beating a schedule or cost target. Like having the fee at
risk, is intended to motivate the contractor to minimize costs and duration.
Determining the appropriate incentive is one difficulty, another is that once the
target has been missed, the incentive is no longer a motivating factor.
Time and Materials (T&M)
 Simple billing at pre-negotiated rates for labor and materials on a project. Some
Fixed Price contracts specify this as a method for determining costs of change
orders. Labor rates include a certain percentage markup for overhead. In this
arrangement all risk goes to the owner.
Cost Plus Percentage of Costs (CPPC)
 This is very similar to the cost plus fixed fee contract except that the contractor
bears even less risk. Their fee is calculated based on a percentage of actual
costs.
140


Allows for both parties to ensure that they
meet their contractual agreements
Includes application of appropriate project
management processes to the contractual
relationship




Direct and manage project execution
Risk and quality control
Performance reporting and review
Claims administration
141



Ensure Proper closeout is performed
Updating administrative records
Organizational process assets updates
 Contract file
 Deliverable acceptance - sign-off key
 Lessons learned documentation
142
Project Title
Project Sponsor
Objective
Procurement Plan
Make Inhouse
Purchases
143
144
“Project Integration Management – Includes the
processes and activities to identify, define,
combine, unify, and coordinate the various
processes and project management activities
within the project Management Process groups.”
PMBOK P.71






Develop Project charter
Develop project Management Plan
Direct and manage Project Execution
Monitor and Control Project work
Perform Integrated Change Control
Close Project or Phase
145

Initiating
 Develop Project Charter
 Develop Preliminary Project Scope Statement

Planning
 Develop Project Management Plan

Executing
 Direct and Manage Project Execution

Monitoring & Controlling
 Monitor and Control Project Work
 Integrated Change Control

Closing
 Close Project
146
RESOURCES
Input
Information
?
?
INTEGRATED
PROCESS
OUTPUTS
Output
Profits
?
?
147

“The process of developing document that
formally authorizes a project or a phase and
documenting initial requirements that satisfy the
stakeholders needs and expectations.” PMBOK P.73
Project manager has authority to apply organizational
resources
 Project manager should be selected before project
planning


Charter
Documents Business needs
 Project justification
 Understand customer requirements

148

The process of documenting the actions
necessary to define, prepare, integrate, and
coordinate all subsidiary plans.”PMBOK. P-71
Characteristics and Boundaries of Project
 Scope
 Associated Products and services
 Methods of acceptance Criteria
 Initial defined risk
 Schedule milestones

149

“The process of tracking, reviewing, and
regulating the progress to meet the
performance objectives defined in the project
management plan.” PMBOK p.71


Performed to monitor project processes associated
with; initiating, planning, executing, and closing.
Continuous monitoring identifies and reduces effects
of risk
150

“The process of reviewing all change request,
approving changes and managing changes, to
the deliverables, organizational process assets,
project documents, and the project
management plan.” PMBOK P.71





Projects rarely run as planned
Ability to identify changes
Approved changes needed
Implementation of changes
Insure scope, cost, schedule & quality are integrated
into the changes
151
CHANGE CONTROL SYSTEM

A collection of formal documented procedures that
define the steps by which official project documents
may be changed.
 Defined levels of change
 Logging Mechanism
 Tracking System
 Approval process with various types of changes
152

“The process of finalizing all activities across
all of the project management process groups
to formally complete the project or phase.” PMBOK
P.71

Administrative Closing
 Details performing the project closure portion of the
project management plan
 Analysis, new processes and archiving project
information

Contract Closure
 Product and project verification
153
Project Title
Project Sponsor
Objective
Project Charter
Preliminary Scope Statement
Preliminary Product Description
154
Class Activity
 Complete class project
 Renewable Energy Project
management

155
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156

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