K-12 Oregon Literacy Framework

Report
HOW THE OREGON LITERACY
FRAMEWORK CAN SUPPORT
YOUR EFFORTS TO IMPLEMENT
RTI, MTSS, AND CCSS
ERIN A. CHAPARRO, PH.D.
[email protected]
@EBISSERIN
1
THE OREGON K-12 LITERACY FRAMEWORK:
A WEB TOUR
H T T P : / / W W W. O D E . S T A T E . O R . U S / S E A R C H / P A G E / ? I D
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The Oregon K-12 Literacy Framework
…is a blueprint…adopted by the State Board…for what schools in
Oregon can do to help students develop the essential skill of reading.
3
The Literacy Framework is aligned to recent
and current Oregon initiatives that improve
reading.
Oregon Literacy
Initiative
Superintendent
Summer
Institute
Reading First
Outreach
EBISS
Response to
Intervention
PBIS
Essential Skill
of Reading
Oregon Diploma
Common Core
State Standards
THE OLF BUILDS ON EBISS TO SUPPORT CCSS
Goals
Instruction
Assessment
Leadership
Professional
Development
Commitment
Leadership & Commitment
Action Planning with Schools
Coordination & Coaching
Professional Development &
Training
Ongoing Assessment and
Evaluation Systems
Visibility & Political Support
Funding
5
ELA &
Content
Areas
CCSS
K-5
General
Cross
Discipline
Standards
Grade
Specific
Reading
Writing
Speaking
and Listening
Language
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
Literature
Writing
Speaking
and
Language
Language
6-12
ELA
General
Cross
Discipline
Standards
Reading
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
Writing
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
Speaking
and
Listening
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
Informational
Text
Language
Content
Areas
General
Foundational
Cross
College and Skills Discipline
Career
Standards
Readiness
Anchor
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
College and
Career
Readiness
Anchor
Language
Literacy in
History/Social
Studies
Progressive
Literacy in
Science &
Literacy in
History/Social
Studies,
Science &
Technical
Subjects6
Grade
Specific
Grade
Specific
Literature
Information
Writing
Speaking
and
Language
Reading
Progressive
Skills by
Grade
Writing
OBJECTIVES OF THE FRAMEWORK
All students read at grade level or above as
soon as possible after entering school.
All students continue to advance in gradelevel reading skills each year across the
instructional areas in grades 4-12.
All students reading below grade-level receive the
strongest reading instruction and interventions possible
to help them read at grade level.
HOW CAN WE WORK TOGETHER
TO BETTER PREPARE STUDENTS
FOR FUTURE SUCCESS?
The major question…
Is the system of reading
instruction and support in
our district/school
effective for a high
percentage of students?
SIX
COMPONENTS
OF THE
FRAMEWORK
One Chapter
for Each
Component
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GOALS
12
Measurable goals
Aligned to CCSS
Assessed frequently
ESTABLISH READING GOALS WITHIN A
COMPREHENSIVE AND SUSTAINED SCHOOL
READING PLAN
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GENERAL GOAL SETTING GUIDELINES
80% (ideally more) students in a
school should be reading at
grade level and their needs
should be met by the core
instruction
15% of students may need
additional instructional support
5% of students may need
significant additional and
individualized support
14
15
REVIEW DATA SOURCES
http://schools.oregonliv
e.com/search/
Past Achievement
Compact goals –
current ones if you
have them
http://www.orspdgdata.
org/HomePages/
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CONSIDER DIFFERENT TYPES OF GOALS
Outcome Goals
 Summative
Adequate Progress Goals
 Summative (if at end of year)
 Formative (if during year)
Progress Monitoring Goals
 Formative
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QUESTIONS TO ASK ABOUT YOUR GOALS
Aggregated Data
Disaggregated data
(District or School-wide)
(District or School-wide)
Are they measureable?
Are they measureable?
Are they clearly communicated
to all stakeholders? How?
Are they clearly communicated
to all stakeholders? How?
Are they ambitious? How?
Are they ambitious? How?
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PART 2:
USING THE
OLF
TO SUPPORT IMPLEMENTATION
OF THE CCSS
LEADERSHIP,
PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT &,
COMMITMENT
19
20
LEADERSHIP
Leadership creates a
coherent plan for
reading based on
data analysis
Leadership prioritizes
attainment of reading
goals for all students
Leadership is
distributed,
connected, and
consistent
Leadership is
knowledgeable about
standards,
assessments, and
instruction
Leadership provides
ongoing feedback
through classroom
observations
REFLECTION OR TABLE TALK
How is the building leadership team
currently supporting your school’s
implementation of the CCSS?
How is the district supporting
building leaders to grow their
understanding of the CCSS?
22
LEADERSHIP OBSERVES &
PROVIDES FEEDBACK
Ongoing feedback through classroom observations
Walking the Talk:
Providing powerful instructional leadership
through effective school and classroom walkthrough visits
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WHY DO WALK-THROUGHS?
“The walk-through’s connected to the.....”
walk-through
instructional leadership
teacher effectiveness
student achievement
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PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
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Data-driven
Differentiated
PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Researchbased
Time to plan,
reflect, refine
27
WHAT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
INITIATIVES DO YOU ALREADY HAVE IN PLACE?
IN ALIGNMENT
WITH CCSS
COMPETES WITH
CCSS
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ALIGN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
WITH THE SCHOOL READING PLAN
Analyze data
•Examine data from previous and
current grade levels
Target
professional
development
•Specifically target professional
development aligned to goals in the
School Reading Plan and monitor
the impact on instruction and
student reading outcomes
Principals
Coaches
Data Team
Leaders
Teachers
Instructional
Assistants
New Staff
New
Teachers
Substitute
Teachers
TOSAs
Professional Development is differentiated
according to position and need.
Develop a CCSS
Implementation Plan
Set goals &
assess
regularly.
Share goals
and progress
with all staff
throughout
the school
year.
COMMITMENT
Provide
instruction
and
professional
development
to staff who
need support.
Create
leadership
structures
and establish
commitment
to all students
meeting &
exceeding
goals.
31
PHASES OF CCSS PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT IMPLEMENTATION
Build
Awareness
Develop
deeper
understanding
Evaluate and
Revise
Integrate with
curricula and
assessment
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AUDIT OF PD FOR CCSS EFFORTS
Target
Audience
Venue
Goal of Training
Timeline
All Staff
Staff
Meetings
Share what teams have learned or integrated
into their teaching
Monthly
Classroom
Teachers
Grade Level
Team
Meetings
1) Curriculum alignment (e.g. throughout the
year place a check mark next to those
standards that are addressed)
2) Instructional delivery collaboration
3) Instructional problem-solving
Monthly
All
Instructional
Staff
Classroom
Walkthroughs
Performed by administrators or other teachers Monthly
to provide feedback and support
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THINKING OUTSIDE OF THE BOX
Tiffany-Morales, J., Astudillo, S., Black, A., Comstock, M., & McCaffrey, T. (2013). Preparing
for the Common Core: Using performance assessment tasks for professional development (A
report from the Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning at WestEd). San Francisco,
CA: WestEd.
34
DISCUSSION: PD CCSS STRENGTHS
What are the current strengths of your PD system to support CCSS implementation
within your school?
Within your district?
Who is the target audience?
What are the target content/learning objectives?
When does the pd take place?
Where does it take place?
How often does it take place?
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DISCUSSION: PD CCSS GAPS IN IMPLEMENTATION
What are the current gaps of your PD system to support CCSS implementation within
your school?
Within your district?
Who are we missing in our current plan?
What content have we not covered?
When does the PD take place? Are we using our
current meeting structures to support this work?
Where does it take place?
How often does it take place?
36
CCSS Implementation Action Plan
District: ____________________________
Date of completion: ______
Team:
DIRECTIONS: After completing an evaluation of district status on the features of CCSS Implementation
using the District CCSS Fidelity Self-Assessment districts may use this Action Plan template to establish
priorities and monitor implementation goals. Not every subsection must be filled in and teams may
choose specific areas to focus on.
CCSS Implementation Action Plan
Oregon Literacy
Framework
Chapters
1. Goals
1.
Communication of
goals
2. Instructional staff
know district goals
3. Instructional staff
know their own
grade level goals
Needed Actions
Who
When
Complete
ACTION PLANNING
2. Instruction
4. K-5, high-quality
informational text
5.
K-5 high-quality
literary text
6. 6-12, high–quality
informational text
7.
6-12 high-quality
literary text
3. Assessment
8. District-wide
literacy plan
9. Administrative
walk-throughs
focused on
instructional
delivery
10. Grade-level teams
analyze ELL data
11. Grade-level teams
analyze data of
students with
disabilities
12. Department teams
analyze ELL data
13. Department teams
analyze data of
students with
disabilities
14. Teachers create
instructional plans
based on data
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ACTION PLANNING
Linn Elementary School Reading Plan
School
Reading
Plan
Date: April 13, 2010
Reading Plan Review Timeline:
This plan will be reviewed and updated every June. The reading plan will be reviewed with new staff at
the start of every school year.
Component 1: Goals
Primary Reading Goal: All children will be reading at grade level by grade 3.
Intermediate Reading Goal: All children will be reading to learn at grade level by grade 6.
Formative Reading Goals:
Kindergarten
Phonemic Awareness
Middle: 18 correct phonemes per minute
End: 35 correct phonemes per minute
Phonics
Middle: 13 correct sounds/ 3 words recoded correct per minute
End: 25 correct sounds/8 words recoded correct per minute
First Grade:
Phonics
Beginning: 25 correct sounds/8 words recoded correct per minute
Middle: 50 correct sounds/15 words recoded correct per minute
Fluency
Middle: 20 correct words per minute
End: 50 correct words per minute
Second Grade
Fluency
Beginning: 44 correct words per minute
Middle: 68 correct words per minute
End: 90 correct words per minute
Third Grade
Fluency
Beginning: 77 correct words per minute
Middle: 92 correct words per minute
End: 110 correct words per minute
Fourth Grade
Fluency
Beginning: 93 correct words per minute
Middle: 105 correct words per minute
End: 118 correct words per minute
Fifth Grade
Fluency
Beginning: 104 correct words per minute
Middle: 115 correct words per minute
End: 124 correct words per minute
Sixth Grade
Fluency
Beginning: 109 correct words per minute
Middle: 120 correct words per minute
End: 125 correct words per minute
DRAFT
COMMITMENT
TO PARENTS
COMMITMENT TO
THE COMMUNITY
ONLINE RESOURCES FOR
EDUCATORS http://oregonliteracypd.uoregon.edu/
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Thank you for your efforts and your
commitment to improving educational
outcomes for Oregon’s students!
[email protected]
@EBISSErin
541-346-1103
“ALL OF US DO NOT HAVE
EQUAL TALENT, BUT ALL OF
US SHOULD HAVE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY TO DEVELOP
OUR TALENTS.”
JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY

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