Global Fund Secretariat: Replenishment strategy

Report
“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment
Strategy Overview
“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
“The Big Push”
• The Big Push is a global campaign developed for use beyond
the Global Fund but being adopted to fit into a larger narrative
while focusing on the 3 epidemics and Replenishment to
ensure success and to achieve our collective goals.
• It is a difficult time to be raising for money but there is a
historic moment. All of our partners, from health workers to
advocates to political leaders will need to engage. We need to
motivate our allies.
• The Global Fund is preparing carefully for its Fourth
Replenishment Conference in late 2013, to ensure predictability
and the opportunity for scaling up.
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
II. STRATEGY OVERVIEW
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
Engagement Across Sectors
• Global Fund replenishment will need to be supported at the highest
political level. This year, we are again approaching Mr. Ban to play a
leadership role in the Fourth Replenishment along with high-level CoChairs from the 4 pillars. “The Big Push” strategy is dependent on
leadership and from four key sectors assuming joint responsibility:
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Traditional Donors
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Implementing Countries
4
Emerging Economies
Private Sector
• Civil Society Advocacy will be critical across all four pillars.
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
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Traditional Donors
• The Global Fund and partners will engage political leaders from traditional
donor countries to advocate for fellow donor governments to invest in the
Global Fund.
• One major donor – preferably from Europe – should be asked to host the
pledging conference
• Many donor countries have made extraordinary efforts to support global
health. Among them the U.S. and France stand out as historical champions in
the fight against AIDS and other communicable diseases and are the two
biggest donors of the Global Fund. This role will make them natural
champions for the replenishment.
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ODA trends
• ODA trends are not encouraging
– Many donor countries are reducing ODA (NL, Japan)
– Very few are increasing ODA (UK, Norway, Sweden,
Australia?)
• Need to work with NGOs and parliaments to
protect budgets
• Promote innovative funding such as FTT
– Introduced by France
– Accepted in principle by 11 European countries
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
2
Implementing Countries
• Champions from implementing countries will be essential advocates in “The
Big Push.”
• The goal is to have a Head of State of one or two implementing countries to
serve as Co-chair/s
• Implementing countries are achieving extraordinary results and are also
demonstrating their commitment through increased domestic resources.
• With support from partners, the Global Fund will call on Heads of State in
implementing countries to help renew confidence in Global Fund activities
among existing and new donors building on the impact achieved on the
ground.
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Potential Champions
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President Goodluck Jonathan, Nigeria
President Johnson Sirleaf, Liberia
President Kikwete, Tanzania
President Sall, Senegal
President Banda, Malawi
PM Desalegn,Ethiopia
PM Tsangirai, Zimbabwe
President Youdhoyono, Indonesia
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
3
Emerging Economies
• Emerging economies – particularly members of the G20 – are increasingly important
partners in achieving internationally agreed development targets.
• The goal is to have a Head of State of one or two emerging economies to serve as Cochair/s and to announce significant financial contributions directly to the Global Fund
and/or co-financing with the Fund.
• Some, such as Russia, have provided an example of becoming donors to the Global
Fund through a reimbursement scheme and efforts to become net donors, while
others have contributed more through enhancing domestic resources.
• Additionally, because some emerging economies prefer to contribute through other
mechanisms (e.g. co-investment, provision of technical assistance and services), the
Global Fund will encourage and facilitate their involvement by presenting a package
of options for engagement, some of which should be announced at the
replenishment conference.
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
4
Private Sector
• As the Global Fund engages businesses and explores innovative-finance
schemes, it will rely on its private sector partners for critical advocacy
support and strategic input.
• Long-standing partners, such as Chevron, Product (RED), Anglo American
and Coca-Cola, can use their networks and influence to make a strong
case for the Global Fund.
• Initiate another giving campaign from implementing countries with Friends
Africa (Gift from Africa)
• Engage High Networth Individuals
• It is also the goal to have at least one significant innovative finance
announcement.
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Civil Society Advocacy
• Strengthen a cohesive Civil
Society movement
• Engage Civil Society and key
stakeholder from Emerging
economies and in
implementing countries.
• Support CS in playing a
Critical role in maintaining
funding in donor countries
and expanding the support
donor base
Friends of the Fund
• Act as policy and resource provider of reference in respective
region, and provide political intelligence to Secretariat
• Organize activities and events and to educate and raise
visibility of GF for political advocacy
• Facilitate High Level visits and meetings for GF officials
Parliamentary Work
• Engage Parliamentarians from
existing donor countries, organize
exchange visit to show case the
impact of the Global Fund
Support
• Engage the Parliamentarians from
Emerging economy Bloc
• Organize hearings in parliaments
of major donor countries
Multilateral partners
• Work together to reinforce messages
• Support engegment of champions in both
donor and implementer countries
• Meet regularly to coordinate implementation
strategy
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
International Processes
G8
• Statement of support in G8 accountability report and call for robust replenishment
in communique
• Create leverage between G8 donors though high level bilaterals
G20
• Focus on Development for All track on G20 Agenda and within that, the G20’s
active participation in developing the post-2015 Agenda
World Bank Spring meetings
• Seek Ministers of Finance and WB senior management support for increased
contributions/innovative financial partnerships respectively
Post 2015
• Seek to influence the health chapter via the UK PM office
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
IV. CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
The Global Fund and partners will leverage a number of high-level events and key
milestones to engage decision makers and stakeholders. These events will offer
opportunities to amplify partner voices, cultivate advocates and secure
new commitments.
“The Big Push” Activities:
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Convening high-level meetings with key stakeholders
Educating political leaders and decision makers
Mobilizing new Global Fund advocates through side-events and bilateral meetings
Hosting exhibitions showcasing progress made in implementing countries
Drafting timely op-eds and blogs related to Global Fund replenishment
Echoing Global Fund and partner messaging through social media outlets
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“The Big Push”
Global Fund Replenishment Strategy Overview
Tools and Assets for Partners
• Here I am Ambassadors with video clips featuring people directly benefitting
from Global Fund grants.
• Joint planning with the ActV/Endgame campaign (Paul Zeitz/Leigh Blake)
• Blogs by opinion shapers and supporters to highlight progress and make a call to
action to finish the fight.
• Portraits of decision makers, opinion shapers and supporters showing their support
for global health goals.
• Graphs and interactive infographics to create an easily consumable narrative that
highlights what can be achieved with enough investment and support. These will be
shared on social media and offered to partners as digital media content.
• Ads and banners for print and online use.
• Social media toolkits, including messaging partners can use in their own platforms.
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2013 Timelines and work plan leading to 4th Replenishment
Q12013
Jan
Q22013
Feb
March
April
Q32013
May
June
July
Q42013
Aug
Sep
1st Repl
Preparatory
Meeting
Brussels
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Confirm Chair, Vice-Chair and co-
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Secure hosts for pledging conf.
Main
Donors
G20/New
Donors
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Familiarize new donors with GF and 4th Repl.
Define and provide incentives for new donors
Engage traditional donors in outreach to new ones
Mobilize champions among the G20 leaders
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Mobilize advocates from civil society,
foundations and the private sector to support
4th replenishment
Targeted media campaigns
•
TBC Repl.
Prep. meeting
Brussels
23-27 WEF Davos
Jan
Feb
March
Dec
Final outreach to political level in donor countries for pledging
conference
Prepare papers for pledging conference
Towards Preparatory Meeting:
• 1st round of visits to donor capitals
to provide information on reforms
and transformation and results
report 2012
Advocates
Nov
4th Repl
Pledging
Conference
Replenishment sponsors
• Prepare papers for 1st meeting
Process
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Oct
Towards Pledging Conference :
• 2nd round of visits to donor capitals to present new
funding model, resource needs and results
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Visits to new donor capitals
Implement specific advocacy campaigns in target
1-3 TICAD
countries
17-19
Report HLP
GF 29th BM
26-27 post-2015
Sri Lanka
AU Summit
17-18
1-3
Addis
G8
Summit
TICAD
20-28 WHA
UK
Yokohama
GVA
April
May
7-11 ICASA
Cape Town
Yokohama
June
18-22 ICAAP
Bangkok
UNGA/MDG
Review Summit NY
5-6 G20 Summit
Russia
July
Aug
Sep
4th Repl.
Pledging
conf.
Oct
GF PF
TBD
TBD GF Board
Nov
Dec

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