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FLAME OF THE FOREST
Scientific Name: Butea monosperma
FLAME OF THE FOREST
Originated from Madagascar
Discovered by botanist Wenzel Bojer in 1820
Description:
 Flowers grow in dense clusters
 Flame-coloured and faintly scented
 Fruits are long pods, dangling down sword-like
FLAME OF THE FOREST
Animal Pollination: Birds
Petals brightly coloured
Nectar
Funnel-shaped to enable the bird to sip the nectar
Stigma sticky
Capable of self and cross pollination
FLAME OF THE FOREST
Uses:
Planted as an ornamental tree in parks, gardens
and along roads as they are spectacular and
beautiful when in full bloom
Broad umbrella-shaped crown makes it a good
shade tree
Bark can be used as a cooling drink to prevent
fevers
MODE OF POLLINATION
• Insect-Pollinated
FEATURES
Large, brightly coloured
petals
Small stigmas that does
not protrude out of
flower
Scented
EXPLANATION
Most fragrant in the evening
to attract the moths, which
come in search for nectar.
But the flower has no
nectar. So the moths would
unintentionally pollinate the
flower while trying to search
for the nectar.
MODE OF POLLINATION
Insect/Animal Pollinated
Pollinated by butterflies,
but
mostly
by
hummingbirds
FEATURES
Large, brightly coloured
petals
Nectar present
EXPLANATION
The birds hover at the
bloom, draw nectar
with their long and
slender bills, and
transfer pollen by
coating
themselves
with it via their
flapping
wings.
MORNING GLORY
Scientific name: Ipomoea indica
Mode of pollination: Insect
MORNING GLORY
Common Insect-Pollinated Flower
Large, brightly coloured petals
Nectar present
May be scented
Small stigmas that does not protrude out of the flower
Stamens are not pendulous and does not protrude out of
flower
Pollen are fairly abundant, large with rough surfaces
Nectar guides may be present on the petals
Ipomoea indica
P
P
O
P
P
P
P
MORNING GLORY
The Morning Glory opens in the morning and
closes at night.
WHY?
In the daytime, it is more likely that insect pollinators would be
visiting the flowers. At night it is less likely that these insect
pollinators will come. Through natural selection, the plant has
learnt that opening in the morning is more ‘successful’ than
opening at night. Therefore over time, the plant has evolved
with this feature.
MORNING GLORY
Morning Glory has creeping stems.
This can potentially cause a serious weed
problem.
Morning Glory seedpods
MODE OF POLLINATION
• Pollinated by insects
• Such as bees
ADAPTATION FOR POLLINATION
• Although mode of pollination is by
insects, its flowers are small and has no
fragrance
• This is compensated by the plant
transforming the buds near them to
resemble blossoms. These have colorful
petals and attract the bees.
PICTURES
MODE OF POLLINATION
• Pollinated by animals
• Birds (Hummingbird)
• Insects (Butterfly)
ADAPTATION FOR POLLINATION
•
•
•
•
Produced in clusters
Has long floral tubes
Brightly colored
Produces hard, fleshy berries
PICTURES
DANDELION
Scientific Name: Taraxacum officinale
DANDELION
Originated from Europe and Asia
Description:
 Golden yellow flowers
 Round, fluffy seed head
DANDELION
Mode of Pollination: Wind Pollinated
Feathery seeds produced to be dispersed by wind
Small and light
Capable of both self-pollination or cross-pollination
Video:
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/media/16679/D
andelions-are-capable-of-both-self-pollination-and-crosspollination
DANDELION
Uses of dandelion:
Dandelion leaves are used to add flavour to
salads, sandwiches, and teas, to help the body
get rid of excess fluid
Roots are mainly used as an appetite stimulant,
and for liver and gallbladder problems
Flowers are used to make wines
MIMOSA
Scientific name: Mimosa pudica
Mode of pollination: Insect (Bees), Wind
MIMOSA
Common Wind-Pollinated Flower
Small, dull, may be even without petals
Mimosa pudica
P
However it has pink flowers
Nectar absent
O
For bees
Usually unscented
Large, feathery stigmas that protrude out of the flower
Stamens are pendulous and protrude out of the flower
Pollen produced in great abundance, small, lightweight with
smooth surface
Nectar guides absent
P
P
P
P
P
MIMOSA
The Mimosa closes its leaves when touched or
exposed to other stimuli like fire and wind.
WHY?
It is the result of the internal movement of water. A stimulus
triggers certain areas of the stem to release chemicals, which
cause water to move out of cell vacuoles and leads to cell
collapse. This is an act of defense against herbivores.
Mimosa is widely used in traditional medicine, because
of its medicinal properties. It can even be used to combat
glandular tumours and uterine cancer!
However it is also a weed because it has prickles on its
stem, and is easily found anywhere.
MIMOSA
Mimosa plant is easily found, and can cause weeding problems
because of its prickles on its stem.

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