Supporting Success in the Era of AB12

Report
Post-Secondary Education:
Opportunities for Foster Youth
in the Era of AB12
Agenda
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Introductions
AB12 – A New Opportunity
How to Motivate and Inspire
- Break College – The Basics
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System Overview
Admission and Enrollment
Financial Aid
Retention and Support Programs
Questions and Answers
Introductions
AB12 – A New Opportunity
Foster Youth and Education

Last year in California over 4600 foster youth
aged out of care
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Of youth surveyed regarding AB12, 83%
indicated a desire to go to college
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Studies show that only 25% will complete one
year of college and 5% will obtain a 2 or 4
year degree
Why Education Matters: It Pays
Why Else Higher Education
Matters
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Changing job market increasing importance of
higher education
Lower incarceration rates
Improved health outcomes
 lower smoking rates
 more positive perceptions of personal health
Higher levels of civic participation, including
volunteer work and voting
What challenges do foster youth
currently face in higher education?
Inadequate
housing
Lack of
financial
resources
Frequent
changes in
home and
school leave
youth
unprepared
Lack of
adult role
models
Lack of
information
about higher
education,
financial aid,
support
resources etc.
AB 12 Will Address Many of These
Issues by Providing….
Housing
through an
approved
placement
In some
cases may
receive
benefit
directly
Monthly visits
with social
worker and
assistance
with transition
to
independence
Health
insurance
until age
21
Independent
Living
Services
Potential of Extended Foster Care
to Promote Educational Outcomes
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“Midwest Study” - Surveyed 732 youth who exited foster
care from Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin at ages 18, 19, 21,
and 24
 In care youth 3 times more likely to complete one year
of college and 2.5 times more likely to obtain BA
 Being in care was associated with a 38 percent
reduction in the risk of becoming pregnant
AB12 will improve outcomes, but foster youth still likely
to lag behind peers
Need additional support – from you!
In the past…
Child Welfare
Post-Secondary
Education
Foster
Youth
Moving Forward…
Child Welfare
Post-Secondary
Education
Foster
Youth
Encouraging Education
Participation: An Evidence
Based Approach
Encourage youth who think they
can’t go to college
“No one rises to low expectations”
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Danger of the self-fulfilling prophecy
Set high expectations – regardless of past performance
Emphasize opportunity that extended foster care
presents
Consistently express expectation that the youth will
graduate from high school and go on to college
Encourage all adults involved with the student, including
teachers, to give this message and to use such phrases
as, “When you go to college….”
Early Preparation
“The intervention of one significant person at a critical point in the life of a
student is extremely significant to educational success for students from
low-income backgrounds.” – Joan Merdinger, PhD, Education Expert
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Motivate from a young age
Team effort (social worker, caregiver, CASA, etc.)
Bring in resources early
 County educational liaisons
 School counselors
 Foster Youth Services
 ILP
A-G requirements and standardized tests
Explain differences between college
and high school
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Students choose to be there
Flexible schedule – students manage their own
time
Breaks between classes
Students get to pick their own classes
Much wider range of subjects
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Career and technical education pathways
Opportunities for extra-curricular activities
Discuss the Benefits
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$$$ MORE MONEY $$$
More career options
Chance to explore new fields
Opportunities to develop communication
skills, social interaction skills, analytical
skills, and reasoning skills
Make new friends and meet valuable
connections
Long term improved health
Expose youth to role models and
college life
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Connect with foster care alumni in college or
who have completed postsecondary
education
Enroll in mentoring programs
Field trips to local colleges
Influence of peers
Other ideas?
Hold youth accountable
“My junior year I only went to class about half the time. Then in my senior
year, my first period teacher asked me to promise that I’d show up at least for
first period every day. I ended up with the best attendance record in the whole
class” – Former foster youth
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Hold high academic aspirations
Set clear expectations
Ask every month about school and grades
Follow up on tasks related to education
Use texting for reminders
Accountability as expression of care
Be authentic
Career assessments and interest
inventories
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Allow youth to assess what career fields
might suit them best
Broaden thinking about career options
Recognize previously unknown skills and
interests
Create linkage between career choice and
educational attainment
Fun!
Scenario
Lisa is 18 years old and is nearing completion of high
school. She doesn’t have very good grades although she
will manage to graduate. Lisa is intelligent and primarily
hasn’t excelled in school due to several changes in
schools over the years and an overall lack of motivation.
She has struggled socially and has expressed in the past
that she hates sitting in a classroom all day long. She lives
with her aunt and has decided to stay in foster care for the
time being. The aunt wants to support Lisa to go to
college, but she herself didn’t go to college and doesn’t
know quite where to start. Lisa has two younger siblings
who look up to her.
Discussion Questions
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How would you approach a conversation with
Lisa about her plans after high school?
What are some strategies you might use to
encourage her to participate in postsecondary education?
How would you respond if she believed she
couldn’t succeed in college?
Who else might you bring in to assist with this
process?
College – The Basics
Licensing Requirements
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The caregiver shall assist a nonminor dependent
with developing the skills necessary for selfsufficiency including educational and career
development.*
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A nonminor dependent may request assistance
from the caregiver with the steps to attending
college including application, enrollment,
financial aid, and connecting to support
resources.
*Title 22, Division 6, Chapter 9.5, Section 893178(c)(6)
Overview of Post-Secondary Education
Systems
Community
college
Career &
Technical
Education
Private
colleges
CSU
UC
Community College
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Serves greatest number of foster youth of all
three systems (estimated 7,000 - 10,000)
112 Colleges throughout state
High school
diploma
2-year
Associate
(AA) degree
Transfer to
4-year
university
Career and
technical
education
California State University
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4-year institutions
23 campuses, 412,000 students
More stringent admissions than
community college and less than UC
Accepts freshman admissions and
transfer from community college
1200 – 1300 foster youth
University of California
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4-year institutions
More stringent admissions requirements
than CSU
10 campuses with 222,000 students
Accepts freshman admissions and
transfer from community college
Career & Technical Education
Career & Technical Education Options
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Regional Occupational Centers and
Programs (ROCPs)
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Non-profit community based programs
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Community colleges
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Adult schools
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Private schools
Career & Technical EducationConsiderations
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Targeted, career-focused training
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Can be shorter term programs
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Degree vs. Certificate
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Career Advancement Academies
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Financial aid is available
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Cost considerations and risks associated
with private CTE schools
Access – Admission and
Enrollment
Community Colleges - Admissions
Eligibility for enrollment
Online application – www.cccapply.org
Getting transcripts
Board of Governors fee waiver
Community Colleges – Admissions
& Assessment
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Assessment-COMPASS Evaluation
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Online ID
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Checking e-mail
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Benefits of self-identifying as foster
youth
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Applying for EOPS
Community Colleges – Enrollment
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Determining what classes to take – academic
plans
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How to enroll
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Deadlines - importance of early enrollment
and priority enrollment
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Payment of fees
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Dropping classes – impact and timelines
Cal State – Freshman Admissions
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A-G requirements
Grades and test scores
CSU local preference
Online application: www.csumentor.edu
Application Deadline: Oct 1 – Nov 30
EOP application
Application fee waiver
Writing and math assessment
UC Freshman Admissions
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A-G requirements
Grades and test scores
Personal statement
Online application:
www.universityofcalifornia.edu/apply
Application Deadline: Nov 1 – Nov 30
Application fee waiver
Writing requirement
EOP application
Cal State and UC – Transfer from
Community College
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Students should plan for transfer as soon as
they enter community college
Academic counselor can help create plan
60 semester units college credit required plus
specific course requirements
Minimum 2.0 GPA for Cal State and 2.4 GPA
for UC
Financial Aid
Costs of Attending College
Community
College
CSU
UC
Private
Fees/tuition
$864
$6,489
$13,200
$30,144
Books and
Supplies
$1,656
$1,652
$1,500
$1,455
Miscellaneous
$4,059
$4,041
$4,200
$3,812
Room & board
(on campus)
$7,800
$10,607
$13,200
$9,330
Room & board
(off campus)
$10,863
$11,379
$9,500
$9,330
Room & board
(living w/
caregiver)
$4,347
$4,253
$4,400
$3,880
Total
$11K - $17K
$16K – $23K
$23K – $28K
$40K – $45K
Financial Aid Overview
Cal-Grant
Chafee
Federal Grants
Scholarships
Work Study
Loans
BOG fee
waiver
Financial Aid
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The FAFSA - www.fafsa.gov
How to get help completing the FAFSA
Applying for BOG fee waiver
Deadlines – apply early when possible
 March 2 for maximum aid
 CCC: Prior to start of term – sooner the
better!
Communication
Impact of AB12 income on financial aid
Applying for Aid
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Independent vs. dependent status
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Question #52: At any time since you turned age 13,
were both your parents deceased, were you in foster
care or were you a dependent or ward of the court?
Question #59: As determined by a court in your state
of legal residence, are you or were you in legal
guardianship?
Getting and keeping aid
Enrollment requirements
 GPA requirements
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Chafee Grants
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Requirements
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Open dependency case or ward after 16th birthday
Under 22 as of July 1 of the year they are
applying
Up to $5000 for college or vocational school
To apply: FAFSA + Chafee application
Award priority system
Enrollment requirements
Jeopardy!
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Name the 3 different public post-secondary
education systems in California
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How does someone apply to enter community
college?
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At what point should a student in community
college start planning for transfer to a four year
institution?
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What advantage do foster youth have when
registering for classes that others do not?
Jeopardy!
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What does the term “A-G classes” mean?
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What form needs to be completed to apply
for federal financial aid?
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How does a foster youth apply for a tuition
fee waiver?
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Name two people who a foster youth can
contact about financial aid questions.
College Retention
The TILP and Higher Education
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Incorporate specific goals related to higher ed
into the TILP
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Researching colleges
College visits, meeting with peers and mentors
Meet with FYSI liaison
Applying for financial aid
Obtaining transcripts
Connecting to support resources
Coordinate TILP activities with other support
resources
What you can do to help young
adults stay in school
Connect to campus based resources
 Ensure basic needs met – housing
 Collaborate with other adults in the
youth’s life
 Identify local resources
 Connect with local college personnel
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Staying in School (cont.)
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Motivate and hold accountable
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Regular check-ins
Ask for mid-term grades
Text with reminders
Follow up after key deadlines
Be a support
Provide practical information
 Provide an outlet
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Support Resources for Foster Youth
FYSI
EOP/EOPS
Disabled Students
Programs and
Services
Comprehensive
Campus Support
Programs
Foster Youth Support Programs
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Comprehensive campus support programs
Offer supportive services, both academic and nonacademic
 Located on CC, CSUs and UCs
 Continuum of programs: Visit
www.cacollegepathways.org to locate
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Foster Youth Success Initiative (FYSI)
Liaisons located at each community college
 Assist with navigating all academic and student support
services and programs and accessing financial aid
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EOP/EOPS
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Essential program for lowincome, educationally challenged
students
Provides wide range of
assistance, including book
vouchers, child care referrals, etc.
Program staff can be valuable
liaison and are often
knowledgeable about foster care
Campus Services
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Disabled Students Programs and Services
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20% of foster youth have a learning disability
Provides support services, specialized instruction, and
educational accommodations
Other Services
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Student Education Plan
Tutoring programs
Resources for parenting youth
Financial Aid Officers
Career and Transfer Centers
College/career success courses
Wrap up and Next Steps
 Additional
questions
 Implementation ideas
 Evaluation
Contact Information
For More Information:
www.cacollegepathways.org
Debbie Raucher
[email protected]

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