Presentation by University Police Department

Report
The University of Florida
Police Department
A Triple Crown Accredited Law Enforcement Agency
About the UFPD
1951 – UPD was commissioned. Officers
were deputized through the Alachua
County Sheriff.
1955 – Florida legislature gives university
police departments authority as law
enforcement agencies.
1957 – UPD moves into building at
present location at Museum Rd and
Newell Dr.
1972 – Florida Legislature, by amended
state law, makes university police officers
law enforcement officers of the state.
1996 – UPD earns national law
enforcement accreditation.
1997 – UPD earns state law enforcement
accreditation.
2011 – Florida Legislature extends
jurisdiction of university police beyond
campus borders.
RECENT DEPARTMENT
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
• Triple Crown Accredited.
• Security 500 Magazine Top Public Institution Law
Enforcement Agency for past two years and in the top 10
for the past seven years.
• Recipient of The National Center for Spectator Sports Safety
and Security Merit Award for Ben Hill Griffin Stadium Large
Event Security.
• Requested to host the Department of Justice Conference
on Stadium Security.
RECENT DEPARTMENT
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
• Selected as one of five law enforcement agencies nationwide, and
the only campus law enforcement agency, to serve as a national
Learning Center for specialized police response to those in mental
crisis by the Bureau of Justice and the Council of State Governments
Justice Center.
• Successfully lobbied legislators to expand the jurisdiction of the
university police departments to 1,000 feet beyond campus
boundaries, which increases safety of members of the university
community who frequently cross these borders.
• Successfully lobbied legislators to continue the exemption for
university campuses from the carrying of concealed weapons.
JURISDICTION AND AUTHORITY
By law, University of Florida police officers are
declared law enforcement officers of the state and
conservators of the peace with the right to arrest, in
accordance with the laws of this state, any person
for violation of state law or applicable county or city
ordinances when such violations occur on or within
1000 feet of any property or facilities under the
control of the University of Florida, except that
arrests may be made off campus when hot pursuit
originates on campus.
MUTUAL AID
The department recognizes its responsibility to
be an equal partner ready to respond to offcampus emergencies and has mutual aid
agreements in place with local, county, and state
law enforcement agencies which allow the
sharing or requesting of personnel resources for
combined operational assistance and voluntary
cooperation.
MISSION
The mission of the University of Florida Police
Department is to preserve a safe, secure campus
environment where diverse social, cultural and
academic values are allowed to develop and
prosper through a combination of reactive,
proactive and educational law enforcement
services.
VISION
The vision of the University of Florida Police
Department is to be the national model in the
field of campus law enforcement through the
selection and development of the highest
caliber personnel and by providing innovative
police services.
GOALS
• The recruitment, selection, training, and
fitness of competent police officers.
• The efficient and effective deployment of law
enforcement personnel and services.
• The development, implementation, and
deployment of specialized services and
community based programming.
ACCREDITATION
Commission on Accreditation for Law
Enforcement Agencies (CALEA)
Commission for Florida Law
Enforcement Accreditation (CFA)
International Association of Campus
Law Enforcement Administrators
(IACLEA)
ACCREDITATION
• Department must meet 580 Standards of
Compliance to remain accredited.
• These standards cover just about every facet of
the administration and operation of the
department.
• Instrumental in increasing professionalism and
decreasing liability.
• Any loss of funding jeopardizes the department’s
ability to meet these standards and subsequent
re-accreditation.
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
VICE PRESIDENT
BUSINESS AFFAIRS
ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT
PUBLIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY
00006904
L. STUMP
OFFICE ASSISTANT
00008322
K. JACKSON
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
00004971
D. BAXLEY
OPERATIONS
PERSONNEL
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
00007670
T. DUNN
SUPPORT SERVICES
BUSINESS
OPERATIONS
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
00008533
W. BARBER
PUBLIC INFO. OFFICER
AUXILIARY
SECURITY
PATROL
INVESTIGATIONS
SPECIAL EVENT
SECURITY
COMMUNITY
SERVICES
ADMINISTRATIVE
SUPPORT
TRAINING
Distribution of Salary Dollars
by Major Component
Office of the
Chief
8%
Training
4%
Adminstrative
Services
5%
Community
Services
7%
Criminal
Investigations
8%
Patrol
68%
Office of the Chief
The Office of the Chief is responsible for the overall
management of the Police Department and consists
of:
Assistant Vice President/Chief of Police
Associate Director for Operations
Associate Director for Support Services
Office Assistant (provides clerical assistance
to the Assistant Vice President and
Associate Directors, and also is responsible
for processing employee travel and office
supply related purchases)
Patrol Division
Patrol Division
FTE by Function
Uniformed Patrol
• 1 Commander Law Enforcement Services
• 4 Coordinator Law Enforcement Services
• 8 Law Enforcement Sergeants
• 3 Law Enforcement Investigators
• 36 Law Enforcement Officers (1 FTE funded 100% from Shands)
Communications and Front Desk
• 1 Coordinator Law Enforcement Services
• 3 Sr. Police Communications Operators
• 7 Police Communications Operators (1 FTE funded 100% from
TAPS)
• 3 Police Service Technicians
Patrol Division
FTE by Function
Traffic Unit
• 8 Law Enforcement Officers
Special Event Security
• 1 Coordinator Law Enforcement Services (1 FTE
distributed 83% from Security Fund 149)
• 1 Program Assistant (1 FTE distributed 55% from
Security Fund 149)
Health Science Center Security
• 1 Commander Law Enforcement Services
• 4 Sr. Police Service Technicians
• 12 Police Service Technicians (3 FTE distributed 50%
each from Health Center Fund 149)
Patrol Division
FTE by Function
K-9 Unit
• 1 Law Enforcement Sergeant w/K-9 Gator
• 1 Law Enforcement Officer w/K-9 Rocky
Reserve Officer Program
• 10 OPS Law Enforcement Officers (All distributed 100% from
Security Fund 149)
Nighttime Building Security
• 3 Police Service Technicians
Eastside Campus Security
• 1 Police Service Technician
Emerging Pathogens Institute Security
• 2 Police Service Technicians (2 FTE distributed 100% from
Health Center Fund 149)
Patrol Division
Uniformed Patrol
• Largest operational unit within the division with an allocation of 52
sworn officers.
• 24/7 operation.
• Uniformed Patrol is divided into four 12-hour shifts.
• Each shift is commanded by a Coordinator Law Enforcement
Services (Lieutenant) who is responsible for supervising two squads.
• Each squad is supervised by a Law Enforcement Sergeant and
staffed with five Law Enforcement Officers.
• Patrol staff utilizes various tools and tactics such as police vehicles,
bicycles, foot patrols, covert and stationary assignments.
• Members of the Patrol Division responded to 75,992 calls for
service including 1,752 alarms, provided security for 1,624 campus
special events, and performed over 100,000 security checks during
FY 2012.
Patrol Division
Communications and Front Desk
• There are 14 positions assigned to this function.
• Communications is a 24/7 operation comprised of three eight-hour
shifts each day.
• All dispatch personnel (including all officers who provide a relief
function) are required to be a State certified E911 Public Safety
Telecommunicator and FCIC/NCIC certified.
• All persons assigned to the Communications Center, including
officer relief dispatchers, are trained in and have responsibility for
activating the university’s emergency alert notification system when
appropriate.
• Front Desk Police Service Technicians are available daily from 7:00
a.m. until 11:30 p.m., and greet visitors to the university, issue
temporary parking permits, take police reports for minor property
crimes, and process towed vehicles.
Patrol Division
Traffic Unit
• Staffed by eight officers.
• Four of them on police motorcycles and four of them on
police mountain bikes.
• The primary responsibility of this unit is the safety of
vehicles/pedestrians sharing the roadways and enforcement
of traffic laws.
• Bicycle officers are a very effective law enforcement tool
when dealing with the extremely crowded conditions found
on campus today. Bicycle officers can navigate the congested
areas of campus and respond to emergency calls for service
faster and safer than those in automobiles.
Patrol Division
Special Event Security
•
•
•
Provides security planning and management of
over 1,600 special events each year.
Requires a significant amount of planning and
logistics coordination.
•
Number of staff needed
•
Responsibilities of those involved
•
Crowd and traffic control
•
Logistical and safety concerns
•
Anticipated criminal activities that are
associated with particular events
•
Coordination with other law enforcement
and support agencies should their
assistance be required.
The largest special events the department plans
for are the Gators home football games. A
tremendous amount of time is spent
coordinating security for these games, as each
aspect has to be carefully thought out and
prepared for in an effort to maximize fan safety.
Patrol Division
Health Science Center Security
• Staffed by a police captain and 16 Police Service Technicians, security is
provided to the Health Science Center complex 24 hours daily.
• In addition, a shift officer is assigned to this area 24 hours daily to provide
a more immediate response to crime and emergencies.
• The PSTs provide security both inside and outside the complex, not
including the interior of Shands Hospital. PSTs also perform vehicle patrols
of the parking lots, garages and exterior grounds of the complex and
related buildings from 6:30 pm to 3:00 am daily.
• The PSTs at the HSC are responsible for securing the facility, providing
escorts and general assistance to the students, faculty, staff, and visitors at
Shands Hospital and the HSC.
• Calls for service at the Health Science Center complex account for 22% of
all department calls for service; generating 15% of all police reports, 22%
of all thefts and 25% of all burglaries reported to UFPD.
Patrol Division
K-9 Unit
• The University of Florida
Police Department utilizes
two explosive detection K-9
teams in response to the
need for increased security
precautions at many of the
special events that take
place on the university
campus.
• These handlers logged in
excess of 300 hours of
detection duty in the last
fiscal year.
Sergeant Matt Davis and K-9 Gator
Officer Sam Sexton and K-9 Rocky
Patrol Division
Reserve Officer Program
• Reserve Officers assist full-time officers with crowd and
traffic control, primarily working at campus special
events.
• In accordance with accreditation requirements the
police department must provide Reserve Officers with
the same training and equipment that is provided to all
full-time law enforcement officers.
• The Reserve Officer Program is essential to providing
security at special events and preventing the overuse
of full-time officers which is a safety issue.
• Current budgeting allows for up to 10 Reserve Officers.
Patrol Division
Nighttime Building Security
• The Nighttime Building Security (NTBS) unit is staffed
by three Police Service Technicians (PSTs).
• Unit is operational daily from 6:30 pm to 3:00 am.
• Assigned PSTs (and officers in their absence) are
responsible for securing 56 buildings on campus each
night, all with multiple access points.
• In FY 2012, the NTBS completed 107,381 security
checks, 1,540 citizen assists, and numerous
environmental and safety reports.
• In addition, NTBS PSTs are responsible for reporting
suspicious activity and providing assistance to any
community member in need.
Patrol Division
Eastside Campus Security
• The Eastside Campus is staffed with one Police Service
Technician.
• Security is provided Monday through Friday from 3:00
PM to 11:30 PM.
• The PST is responsible for:
• Conducting security patrols.
• Reporting violations of building security protocols.
• Monitoring door/building maintenance issues
associated with facility security.
• Providing escorts for students, faculty, and staff.
• Providing assistance to visitors.
Patrol Division
Emerging Pathogens Institute Security
• Staffed with two Police Service Technicians.
• Provide security service for two shifts (day shift 0630 hours
to 1500 hours and Evening shift 1430 hours to 2300 hours),
Monday through Friday.
• Responsible for:
• Sentry duties at the main entrance of the building.
• Greeting and signing in guests as well as contacting the
staff member responsible for receiving/escorting them
as required.
• Security of receiving areas when freight/packages being
delivered.
• Monitor security cameras and respond to security/fire
alarms accordingly.
Criminal
Investigations
Division
Criminal Investigations Division
FTE by Function
• Criminal Investigations
• 1 Coordinator Law Enforcement Services
• 1 Law Enforcement Sergeant
• 4 Law Enforcement Officers
• 1 Program Assistant (Crime Analysis)
• Combined Drug Task Force
• 1 Law Enforcement Officer
• FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force
• 1 Law Enforcement Officer
• Property and Evidence
• 1 Law Enforcement Officer
• Applicant Background Investigations
• Threat Assessment
Criminal Investigations Division
Criminal Investigations
• Staffed by six sworn officers and a Program Assistant who provides clerical
and crime analysis assistance.
• Tasked with following up on reports of criminal activity initially reported to
our uniformed patrol officers, including:
• Identifying and interviewing victims/witnesses.
• Gathering of evidence.
• Identification and apprehension of the person(s) responsible.
• Recovery of any property that may have been stolen.
• Assistance in the prosecution of the offender.
• In FY 2012, CID investigative personnel were assigned a total of 560
criminal and non-criminal case reports to conduct initial and follow up
investigation. Detectives successfully cleared and/or concluded an overall
total of 212 of those cases.
• All detectives assigned to this function also have responsibility for
completing applicant background investigations.
Criminal Investigations Division
Combined Drug Task Force
• One sworn officer assigned to the multiagency Alachua County Combined Narcotics
Task Force.
• Allows our department to be at the forefront
of narcotics investigations that have a nexus to
the campus community.
• Participation in the unit generates revenue
sharing as a result of seizures from
investigations.
Criminal Investigations Division
FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force
• The department currently has one Law Enforcement
Officer assigned on a part-time basis to this function.
• The JTTF is a multi-jurisdictional specialized unit
coordinated by the FBI, which deals with issues of
domestic security and terrorism.
• Involvement in this unit allows the police department
to receive and share intelligence information with the
FBI and other federal agencies.
• Involvement in this unit has been invaluable as it
relates to issues of terrorism, especially those
associated with large campus events, and also animal
rights activists.
Criminal Investigations Division
Property and Evidence
• The department has one sworn officer assigned
to this function.
• The Evidence Custodian is responsible for
supervising the chain of custody relating to
property and evidence.
• The Evidence Custodian is also designated as the
Department's Crime Scene Technician.
• Catalogued and stored over 1,200 pieces of
evidence/contraband and 525 lost/recovered
personal property items during the fiscal year.
Criminal Investigations Division
Threat Assessment
• The Criminal Investigations Division works extensively in cooperation with
the Behavioral Consultation Team (BCT) in the development and
dissemination of campus threat assessments and criminal intelligence
analysis.
• The division created and published over 176 public and confidential law
enforcement informational bulletins during the fiscal year.
• These bulletins are the result of intensive investigation and analysis into
behavioral conflicts, criminal acts, attempts to identify unknown suspects,
trespass warnings, identification of re-located registered sexual offenders,
and release status of criminal offenders within UFPD’s jurisdiction.
• The Criminal Investigations Division has completed numerous threat
assessments and criminal intelligence briefs as requested by the Dean of
Students Office, Human Resources, University Admissions Office, Animal
Care Services, College of Veterinary Medicine, and Shands UF, as well as
other state and federal law enforcement agencies.
Community Services
Division
Community Services Division
FTE by Function
• Public Information
• 1 Assistant Director
• Crime Prevention and Community Service
• 1 Commander Law Enforcement Services
• 1 Law Enforcement Sergeant
• 3 Law Enforcement Officers (.30 FTE funded by SNAP)
• 1 Program Assistant
• School Resource Officer Program
• 1 Law Enforcement Officer (1 FTE funded 49% from P. K. Yonge)
• Victim Services
• 2 Coordinator Human Services
• Parking Services
• 1 Coordinator Law Enforcement
• Services Nighttime Student Escort Service Program
Community Services Division
Public Information
• Public Information function performed by an Assistant Director.
• Responsibilities include:
• Coordination and dissemination of all public information
requests coming from journalists (both student and professional)
and members of the public.
• Drafting and dissemination of media releases.
• Responding to the scene of critical incidents to coordinate media
operations.
• Keeping the department’s website up-to-date.
• Federally mandated Clery Act compliance (daily crime and fire
log, timely warning/emergency notification, collection of
statistical data, annual crime safety and fire report).
Community Services Division
Crime Prevention and Community Services
•
•
Staffed by four sworn officers and a
Program Assistant, these employees plan,
develop, and present programs designed to
enhance community safety.
These programs include:
• New Student and Staff Orientation
• Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention
• Personal Safety and Rape Prevention
•
•
•
•
•
Annual Spring Break Fair
Bicycle Registration and
Operation Identification
Gator Watch Crime Watch
Stall Stories
Voluntary Inspection Program
Community Services Division
School Resource Officer Program
• Staffed by one sworn officer, this
program provides a certified
school resource officer to P.K.
Yonge Developmental Research
School.
• The SRO Program is based on a
cooperative relationship between
law enforcement, teachers, school
administrative staff, and parents.
• SRO serves as an instructor,
teaching classes that are related to
legal issues such as juvenile rights,
laws of arrest, search and seizure
and laws pertaining to alcohol,
drugs, DUI and traffic.
Community Services Division
Victim Services
• There are two victim advocates assigned to this function, both of whom
possess Master of Social Services degrees and work closely with other
counseling services on campus.
• The victim advocate will accompany and support victims through all stages
of the criminal justice process such as law enforcement interviews, lineups, testimony, deposition, trial, sentencing, injunction hearings, etc.
• The victim advocate provides emotional support dealing with the initial
issues and feelings the victim may have when first facing their
victimization.
• The victim advocate can also assist with referrals for counseling and other
services that may be required.
Community Services Division
Nighttime Student Escort Service
•
•
•
The Student Nighttime Auxiliary Patrol
(SNAP) is a free, nightly, campus safety
and transportation service cosponsored by Student Traffic Court,
Student Government, and the
University of Florida Police
Department.
The SNAP program is managed within
the Community Services Division and
is directly supervised by one of the
CSD officers.
This officer is responsible for
reviewing applications, conducting
interviews, completing backgrounds,
and training new hires.
• He/she is also responsible for supervising and scheduling the 30 plus SNAP OPS
student employees, maintenance of vehicles, and reviewing productivity of the
service.
Training Division
Training Division
FTE by Function
• Employee Training
• 1 Coordinator Law Enforcement Services
• 1 Law Enforcement Sergeant
• 1 Law Enforcement Officer
• 1 Program Assistant
• Fleet/Property Management
• 1 Law Enforcement Officer
• Quartermaster
Training Division
Employee Training
•
•
Comprised of three sworn officers and a
Program Assistant, the Training Division is
responsible for planning, developing,
coordinating and directing all policies,
operational procedures and programs that
pertain to education and training
requirements for police officers as set forth
by the Criminal Justice Standards and
Training Commission (CJSTC) and laws of
the State of Florida.
All sworn officer training meets and
exceeds the continuing education/training
requirements as outlined by the Florida
Criminal Justice Standards and Training
Commission.
Training Division
Fleet/Property Management
• Fleet/Property Manager is responsible for:
• Coordinating the purchase and maintenance of all
department vehicles.
• Review of all repair/fuel invoices.
• Performing minor repairs and maintenance on the
department’s vehicles and buildings as is
appropriate.
• Maintenance of property control files and the
annual inventory process.
• Coordinating building repairs and key control issues.
Training Division
Quartermaster
• Training Division is responsible for the quartermaster
function within the department, which provides for:
• Coordinating the selection, purchasing, stocking,
issuance and inventory of all equipment and
uniforms.
• Maintaining the storage facility for all uniforms and
equipment and ensuring that a reserve supply of
necessary equipment and uniforms is available
• Monitoring of all equipment that has an expiration
date such as Taser cartridges, gas mask filters, OC
spray, ballistic vests, and less lethal munitions are
tracked and replaced as necessary.
Administrative
Services Division
Administrative Services
FTE by Function
• Personnel
• 1 Administrative Assistant
• Professional Standards
• 1 Coordinator Law Enforcement Services
• 1 Program Assistant
• Police Records
• 1 Program Assistant
• 1 Senior Clerk
• Business Operations
• 1 Business Manager (1 FTE distributed 21.05% from Security Fund
149)
• 1 Accountant
• 1 Office Assistant (1 FTE distributed 49.4% from Security Fund 149)
Administrative Services
Personnel
• All personnel process associated with the posting, selection of
applicants for interview, interviews, background investigation
preparation, and hiring are coordinated by the Administrative
Assistant assigned as the department’s Personnel Manager.
• Due to the high qualifications desired of applicants seeking
employment at the police department, the Personnel Manager
coordinates a time consuming process involving command
personnel within the department to screen potential employees.
• In addition to the hiring process, the Personnel Manager is
responsible for:
• Coordinating the yearly employee appraisal process.
• Keeping employee personnel files up-to-date.
• Providing correspondence to employees and others outside the
department regarding employment opportunities.
Administrative Services
Professional Standards
• The Office of Professional Standards at the
University of Florida Police Department is staffed
by a Coordinator Law Enforcement Services and a
Program Assistant, and is responsible for
maintaining compliance with all state and
national accreditation standards as established by
the respective accrediting commissions.
• OPS is also responsible for the internal affairs
function which is the process by which
department employees are investigated for
allegations of wrongdoing.
Administrative Services
Police Records
• The University of Florida Police Department Records Unit,
staffed by a Program Assistant and a Senior Clerk, is
responsible for compiling, maintaining and disseminating
information from department records regarding both
incident and traffic crash reports.
• The Records Unit is also responsible for providing crime
statistics to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement
(FDLE) for the federally mandated Uniformed Crime Report
which in turn is used to provide an assessment for the level
and types of crime which occurs on campus.
• Records Unit staff process in excess of 3,000 police and
associated arrest reports and 3,000 traffic citations in a
typical year.
Administrative Services
Business Operations
• Business Operations is staffed by a Business Manager,
Accountant, and Office Assistant.
• All business related functions, including payroll processing,
purchasing, billing and receivables, payables, auxiliary
accounting, and budgeting are performed by this staff.
• The Police Department has one of, if not the most difficult
payroll processes within the university due to complex
police bargaining unit payroll regulations.
• This process, combined with the time necessary to process
the large number of billable special events worked by
department employees, requires a large commitment of
time each pay period from the three employees who staff
this unit.
BENCHMARKING
Florida State University
University of Central Florida
University of Texas
Louisiana State University
University of Wisconsin at Madison
University of Arizona
University of Illinois UC
University of Michigan
Purdue University
Ohio State University
BENCHMARKS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Total student headcount per security FTE
Total student headcount per sworn officer FTE
Total employee and student headcount per security FTE
Total employee and student headcount per sworn officer FTE
Campus acreage patrolled per security FTE
Campus building square footage per security FTE
Department operating budget per employee and student
headcount
8. Department salary budget per employee and student headcount
9. Number of security FTE’s as a percentage of department FTE’s
10. UCR campus crimes per 1000 employee and student headcount
11. Number of UCR clearances as a percentage of UCR campus
crimes.
LOWEST
1. Total Student
Headcount per Security
FTE
HIGHEST
309.25
TENNESSEE
321.42
FLORIDA
STATE
419.42
FLORIDA
423.89
LOUISIANA
STATE
519.74
WISCONSINMADISON
408.56
TEXAS
534.72
ARIZONA
609.19
ILLINOIS UC
423.89
LOUISIANA
STATE
529.29
TENNESSEE
540.59
FLORIDA
630.92
FLORIDA
STATE
637.86
WISCONSINMDISON
668.40
ARIZONA
685.34
ILLINOIS UC
747.98
TEXAS
3. Total Employee and
Student Headcount per
Security FTE
414.03
TENNESSEE
441.86
FLORIDA
STATE
495.27
LOUISIANA
STATE
522.01
TEXAS
569.90
FLORIDA
733.28
ARIZONA
4. Total Employee and
Student Headcount per
Sworn Officer FTE
495.27
LOUISIANA
STATE
708.63
TENNESSEE
734.53
FLORIDA
856.81
ILLINOIS UC
867.32
FLORIDA
STATE
5. Campus Acreage
Patrolled per Security
FTE
4.08
FLORIDA
STATE
5.38
ARIZONA
6.29
TENNESSEE
7.56
TEXAS
6. Campus Building
Square Footage per
Security FTE
95,267.18
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
98,603.12
FLORIDA
STATE
126,123.46
ARIZONA
155,126.05
TEXAS
7. Security Operating
Budget per Employee
and Student Headcount
$6.47
PURDUE
$7.15
FLORIDA
STATE
$7.99
ARIZONA
8. Security Salary
Budget per Employee
and Student Headcount
$44.96
OHIO STATE
$62.48
PURDUE
$78.42
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
9. Number of Security
FTE's as a Percentage
of Department FTE's
54.46%
MICHIGAN
59.65%
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
63.75%
ARIZONA
66.39%
71.05%
72.00%
72.36%
WISCONSINOHIO STATE ILLINOIS UC TENNESSEE
MADISON
10. UCR Campus
Crimes per 1000
Employee and Student
Headcount
6.16
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
7.36
WISCONSINMADISON
8.05
FLORIDA
8.26
ILLINOIS UC
9.59
TEXAS
10.27
FLORIDA
STATE
10.43
PURDUE
11.74
MICHIGAN
4.03%
TEXAS
6.12%
MICHIGAN
6.95%
WISCONSINMADISON
7.14%
PURDUE
7.97%
FLORIDA
STATE
11.25%
LOUISIANA
STATE
13.91%
ILLINOIS UC
2. Total Student
Headcount per Sworn
Officer FTE
11. Number of UCR
2.55%
Clearances as a Percent
TENNESSEE
of UCR Campus Crimes
762.25
MICHIGAN
828.49
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
936.00
PURDUE
1038.22
OHIO STATE
762.25
MICHIGAN
936.00
PURDUE
971.33
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
1038.22
OHIO STATE
748.43
761.61
WISCONSINILLINOIS UC
MADISON
957.50
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
1208.50
PURDUE
1390.65
MICHIGAN
1563.09
OHIO STATE
916.60
ARIZONA
918.53
WISCONSINMADISON
955.68
TEXAS
1122.59
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
1208.50
PURDUE
1390.65
MICHIGAN
1563.09
OHIO STATE
11.54
WISCONSINMADISON
17.24
FLORIDA
21.84
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
32.67
OHIO STATE
33.87
LOUISIANA
STATE
57.33
MICHIGAN
63.48
PURDUE
80.83
ILLINOIS UC
166,292.13
TENNESSEE
169,287.04
FLORIDA
191,208.50
LOUISIANA
STATE
281,901.23
191,758.40
WISCONSINILLINOIS UC
MADISON
293,814.93
PURDUE
533,603.41
OHIO STATE
609,090.91
MICHIGAN
$9.37
$12.77
OHIO STATE ILLINOIS UC
$13.75
MICHIGAN
$17.02
FLORIDA
$24.14
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
$38.96
LOUISIANA
STATE
$90.98
ARIZONA
$92.13
TEXAS
$112.48
MICHIGAN
$112.81
LOUISIANA
STATE
$129.85
FLORIDA
82.68%
FLORIDA
STATE
85.00 %
TEXAS
95.38%
LOUISIANA
STATE
17.94
LOUISIANA
STATE
18.75
ARIZONA
23.19%
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
Not Available
OHIO STATE
$80.81
FLORIDA
STATE
$85.76
TENESSEE
$17.46
TEXAS
$23.09
$23.68
WISCONSINTENNESSEE
MADISON
$112.20
$100.30
WISCONSINILLINOIS UC
MADISON
74.07%
PURDUE
80.56%
FLORIDA
13.81
13.85
TENNESSEE OHIO STATE
14.84%
ARIZONA
17.48%
FLORIDA
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
• Friendliness, a total of 89% were either rated Good
(20%) or Excellent (69%);
• Courteousness, a total of 93% were either rated Good
(20%) or Excellent (73%);
• Helpfulness, a total of 88% were either rated Good
(29%) or Excellent (59%);
• Professionalism, a total of 91% were either rated Good
(20%) or Excellent (71%);
• Competence, a total of 92% were either rated Good
(26%) or Excellent (66%); and
• Appearance, a total of 94% were either rated Good
(17%) or Excellent (77%).
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
• Overall quality of police services, 75% of
respondents rated it as either good (28%) or
excellent (47%)
• Level of confidence, 67% of respondents rated
it as either high (23%) or very high (44%)
Assessment of
Performance and Value
• Combining the data presented in both of these
evaluative materials, we believe that the police
department is providing high quality police services at
an acceptable level of efficiency and effectiveness.
• The University Police Department has proven its value
to the university community by continuing to fulfilling
its mission and goals, and holding firm to its vision and
values.
• It has proven that it is a good steward of the funds and
asks that the RCM Committee recognize this value by
funding its budget at the level necessary to continue
this level of service to the university community.
Effects of Any Reduction in Funding
• Primary source of funds affected would be salary dollars, as the
budget for other types of expenses is typically insufficient to
absorb cuts of any significant magnitude.
• Result in elimination of positions associated with each of the
major functions within the department including uniformed
patrol, community service, investigations, and training.
• Proactive services would be reduced or eliminated first in favor
of traditional reactive services.
• Police services limited to reactive functions only is not the
generally accepted standard of police departments within
universities having the size and makeup of the University of
Florida.
Increase to Base Budget
• The department requests that, at a minimum in the next
fiscal year, it be fully funded at the 90 officer benchmarked
standard as determined by the Florida legislature based on
a staffing needs assessment following the Danny Rolling
murders here in Gainesville in the early 1990’s. The total
cost for this addition is $401,672, and it is recurring.
• The department requests that the committee carefully
consider the following timeline of facts and make whatever
financial commitment it can, now and in the near future, to
fund an additional 8 law enforcement positions to
compensate for the increased demand placed on the
department since 1992. The recurring cost of this increase
is approximately $485,000, and startup expenses of
approximately $130,000.
Timeline of Events Affecting Operational Effectiveness and Readiness
EXTERNAL FACTORS
Danny Rolling murders
INTERNAL FACTORS
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
Columbine massacre (15 dead, 21 injured)
911 Terrorist attack, War on terrorism begins
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
Virginia Tech massacre (33 dead, 23 injured)
Northern Illinois University massacre (6 dead, 21
injured)
San Jose State University shooting (3 dead)
Oikos University shooting (7 dead, 3 injured)
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Last Legislature funded increase in LEO FTE.
Baseline: 14.11M campus GSF; 38,399 students; and
11,066 employees*.
UF commits to UPD accreditation (1 LEO FTE).
UF adds 1.95M campus GSF, 4,928 students, and -386
employees in last 5 years.
UPD joins FBI JTTF (1 LEO FTE).
UPD deploys an explosive detection K-9 (1 LEO FTE).
UF adds 775K campus GSF, 5,346 students, and 803
employees in last 5 years.
DOT property becomes UF East Campus.
UPD deploys a 13-member C.I.R.T.
UF mandates officers respond to off-campus alarms.
UF adds 2.6M campus GSF, 3,439 students, and 856
employees in last 5 years.
Shands South Campus opens adding 600K GSF.
Legislature expands UPD jurisdiction, Animal rights
activists begin targeting UF, UPD deploys 2nd K-9.
UF adds 1.59M campus GSF, -3,137 students, and 977
employees in last 5 years (total increase7.52M Campus
GSF, 10,576 students, and 2,250 employees in last 20
years).
Emergency Room visits increase by 38,448 since 2008.
Questions?

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