Chapter 7 Review Questions

Report
Chapter 7:
Classification
Section 7.1 Review
page 236
Key Concepts
1.
What are the dichotomous
keys used for?
1. What are the dichotomous keys used for?
To identify known species
2.
What is binomial
nomenclature?
What is binomial
nomenclature ?
2.
The naming system that uses
the genus and species of an
organism.
3.
Write the names of the seven levels
of classification. Use the beginning
letters to write your own memory
aid for the names.
3.
Write the names of the seven levels of
classification. Use the beginning
letters to write your own memory aid
for the names.
Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species
Critical Thinking
4.
Summarize: What were Carolus
Linnaeus’ main contributions to
taxomony?
4.
Summarize: What were Carolus
Linnaeus’ main contributions to
taxomony?
He developed systems for both
naming species and organizing
them into groups.
Critical Thinking
5.
Analyze: Why do scientists need a
universal system of naming
organisms?
5.
Analyze: Why do scientists need a
universal system of naming organisms?
Having a universal naming
system allows people who
speak different languages to
refer to all organisms in the
same way.
Challenge
6.
Synthesize: Predict what
differences you might find among
organisms in the same species.
6.
Synthesize: Predict what
differences you might find among
organisms in the same species.
Characteristics like size,
coloration, age, and length of
fur.
Section 7.2 Review
page 245
Key Concepts
1.
Why do taxonomists study biological
relationships?
1.
Why do taxonomists study biological
relationships?
Taxonomists study biological
relationships to
• discover how species
evolved and
• how they are related
Key Concepts
2. Describe two types of evidence that
scientists use to classify organisms.
2. Describe two types of evidence
that scientists use to classify
organisms.
Physical evidence and
genetic or DNA evidence.
Key Concepts
3. How do branching diagrams show
how organisms are related to one
another?
3. How do branching diagrams show how
organisms are related to one another?
Branching diagrams can show
when organisms shared common
ancestors and when shared
traits evolved.
Critical Thinking
4. Compare and Contrast: Compare a
cladogram with a dichotomous key.
Explain how they are alike and
different.
4. Compare and Contrast: Compare a
cladogram with a dichotomous key.
Explain how they are alike and different.
Alike - Both are branching diagrams showing
traits that are different in different
species.
Different - Cladograms are hypotheses about
how groups or species are related.
Dichotomous keys identify a specimen by
using pairs of contrasting traits as a
sorting system.
Critical Thinking
5. Predict: The prehistoric flying
animal, Archaeopteryx, has the same
derived characteristic of feathers
as modern-day birds. What can you
infer about their common ancestor?
5. . Predict: The prehistoric flying
animal, Archaeopteryx, has the same
derived characteristic of feathers as
modern-day birds. What can you
infer about their common ancestor?
One thing you can infer is that a
common ancestor was a
species that had feathers.
Challenge
6. Apply: Your classmate says that
the organism at the end of a
cladogram is the most evolved.
Explain why your classmate is wrong.
6. Apply: Your classmate says that the
organism at the end of a cladogram is the
most evolved. Explain why your classmate is
wrong.
One reason he is wrong is the
cladograms show taxonomists’
ideas about when certain species
had common ancestors.
They focus only on certain derived
characteristics.
Section 7.3 Review
page 256
Key Concepts
1. What caused scientists to change
the way they classify species?
1. What caused scientists to change
the way they classify species?
New discoveries about their
evolution.
Key Concepts
2. What are the two most familiar
kingdoms?
2. What are the two most familiar
kingdoms?
Plants (Plantae) and
animals (Animalia).
Key Concepts
3. Briefly name and describe the other
four kingdoms.
3. Briefly name and describe the other four
kingdoms.
Protista - single or multi-cellular with
nucleus, mostly simple
Fungi - multicellular, get energy by
absorbing materials, have nucleus
Archaea - unicellular, no nucleus,
extreme environments
Bacteria - unicellular, no nucleus
Critical Thinking
4. Communicate: Make a table with
columns titled Animalia and Plantae.
Using as many rows as needed, list
characteristics that differ between
these two kingdoms.
4. Communicate: Make a table with columns titled Animalia and
Plantae. Using as many rows as needed, list characteristics that
differ between these two kingdoms.
Plantae
Animalia
Store DNA in nucleus
Get energy from consuming
organisms
Use Sun’s energy and air to
make sugars
Can move
Cannot move from place to
place
Most have mouths and
nervous systems
Can grow up, around, and
towards light
No cell walls
Have cell walls
Critical Thinking
5. Analyze: Explain how fungi differ
from plants
5. Analyze: Explain how fungi
differ from plants
• Plants use the Sun’s energy and
air to make sugars.
• Fungi take in nutrients from
surroundings.
Challenge
6. Analyze: One bacterium has a
membrane surrounding its DNA.
Should this organism be classified
with the eukaryotes? Why or why
not?
6. Analyze: One bacterium has a membrane surrounding
its DNA. Should this organism be classified with the
eukaryotes? Why or why not?
• Most will say no because the
organism does not have a nucleus.
• Some will say yes because the
membrane and DNA are like a
nucleus.

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