FINAL MasterClass Presentation – For

Report
MasterClass:
Title
of presentation
Applying for Internships and
Name
of presenter
Graduate
Employment
Title
of Development
presenter
Career
Centre
School
/ Faculty
/ Division
La Trobe
University
xx
201x
17 Month
July 2014
latrobe.edu.au/students/careers
CRICOS Provider 00115M
MasterClass: Applying for Internships and Graduate Employment
Workshop Overview
• Researching opportunities
• Networking
• Resumes
• Online applications
• Responding to behavioural questions
• Interviews
• Interview Activity
• Graduate Employers Panel
CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTRE | La Trobe University
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Researching Opportunities
A sample of organisations offering graduate programs, internships
and vacation programs (currently recruiting)
• ALDI
• Anglo American (vacation program)
• ASIO
• Bendigo and Adelaide Bank
• BDO (cadet program)
• Dixon Advisory (internship)
• Defence
• Dept of Environment, Primary Industries
• Industry Cadetships (FTSE)
• KPMG (vacation program)
• Reserve Bank of Australia (internships for PhD students)
• Vic Roads (vacation program and industry based learning)
• Telstra (vacation program)
• Various hospitals (nurse applications close in July)
• Woodside (vacation program)
CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTRE | La Trobe University
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What are the opportunities to get experience?
Formal or informal programs for penultimate or final year students
Vacation programs
•
Degree related work usually at end of second last year of study
•
Usually offered by large organisations also offering graduate programs
Internships / Work placements
•
Supervised work experience in an area related to study and / or career interests
•
Can occur at any time of year for various lengths of time
•
You can arrange an informal placement yourself!
Cadetships
•
Position offered to students or graduates providing training on the job
•
Can be full time or part time
•
Often offered in conjunction with industry bodies or university faculties
CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTRE | La Trobe University
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Eligibility for formal vacation programs
• Check eligibility with each employer
• Mostly undergraduate students in the penultimate year of their
degree (i.e. the summer before your final year)
• Many firms take only students with permanent residence status
• More info on vacation programs can be found at:
http://www.graduateopportunities.com/free-downloads/ebooks/
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What are the opportunities for graduate jobs?
Graduate programs
•
Structured professional development programs lasting 1-2 years in large
organisations specifically for new graduates
•
Many applications must be submitted a year in advance, whilst some are ongoing
•
Only one option!
Graduate positions
•
Formal full time positions offered by organisations of all sizes to students who are
about to / have recently completed their studies
•
Advertised on job boards (seek, careerhub) , by professional associations or just on
company website
Entry level opportunities
•
Get a ‘foot in the door’ in an organisation that provides further opportunities for
training and development and work your way up
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Typical stages of the selection process*
Online application
Psychometric Testing (usually formal programs only)
Phone Screening (may occur)
Assessment Centre (usually formal programs only)
Face to Face Interview
Reference and Probity Checks
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Researching vacation and internship programs
www.graduateopportunities.com/
www.unigrad.com.au/
www.gradconnection.com.au/
http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum/136
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Tips for researching vacation placements / internships
Identify the various sources of information available to you:
 Faculty/school websites and emails
 Industry and professional association websites
 Industry-based learning within your course
 Volunteering
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Graduate jobs info and resources
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Advertised general job vacancies
• Employment websites
www.seek.com.au
www.mycareer.com.au
www.careerone.com.au
• La Trobe’s CareerHub
latrobe.edu.au/students/careers
• Company websites
• Professional associations
• Recruitment agencies
www.rcsa.com.au
• Newspapers
• Industry specific job boards
CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTRE | La Trobe University
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Tips for job websites
• Register your profile so employers can search for you
• Subscribe to job email alerts
• Check everyday for new listings
• Apply ASAP – many employers close vacancies once they
receive enough applications
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Tips for using Recruitment Agencies to find graduate jobs
• They work for the employer, not you
• Register with agencies advertising jobs in your field
• Build relationship with recruiter
• Accept short-term / contract roles
• Ask for feedback on resume, interviews
What are 3 things I could do to improve my interview performance?
In what ways could I make improvements to my resume?
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‘Canvassing’ for a graduate job or work placement
1. Identify companies in your target industry to contact
2. Identify potential contacts within each company
Hiring managers, not HR departments!
Use LinkedIn, personal networks, company websites, to find contacts
3. Decide on contact approach
Email, phone, social media, in-person
4. Prepare tailored cover letter and resume
5. Make contact and provide a copy of your resume
6. Follow-up as appropriate or agreed
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Summary on Researching Opportunities for Jobs and Getting
Experience
• Start your research early
• Use multiple methods
• Target your applications to companies that fit your values and
career goals
• Keep a record of your research findings
• There are many opportunities outside of formal programs
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Networking
“Networking: the exchange of information or services
among individuals, groups, or institutions;
specifically: the cultivation of productive relationships
for employment or business.”
Source: Merriam Webster Dictionary
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Why network?
• develop two-way, mutually beneficial relationships
• find out about your industry
• learn from others
• share your knowledge and skills
• work collaboratively towards common aims
• be aware of opportunities for career advancement
• stay in touch with the right people to get ‘things done’
• communicate your strengths
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Networking can be formal or informal.
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With whom?
People with shared professional interests...
• family
• friends, or friends-of-friends
• at uni
• in professional associations
• in your industry or allied professions
• in organisations you might volunteer with or work for
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Where?
• Informal occasions in day-to-day life
• Clubs and societies at uni
• Professional events
• Online
• Employer events and expos
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How to network
Networking is a skill.
• Be purposeful.
• Actively listen and observe.
• Ask thoughtful, relevant questions and be
interested in people’s responses.
• Ask open-ended questions.
• Be mindful of where you are and other
people’s interests (and time).
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Networking Tips
1. Think ahead.
What’s your aim? Who would like to meet? What do you want?
Names, ideas, introductions? What can you do for others?
2. Get comfortable.
Practice skills. Put yourself into environments you’re comfortable
in as well as getting used to new settings (and people).
3. Go to the right places for your career objective or industry.
4. Follow up on the information and contacts you make.
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Networking online
Facebook
• Will anything be embarrassing if seen by an employer?
• Ensure privacy settings keep employers separated from friends
LinkedIn
• Best for professional networking
• Upload your resume
• Have a professional summary and photo
• Keep up to date with referees and ex-colleagues
CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTRE | La Trobe University
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CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTRE | La Trobe University
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How to use LinkedIn
• Join a special interest group related to your field
• Contribute to conversations in the interest groups
• Update your status regularly ‘seeking opportunities in...’
• Use the resume builder
• Ask former colleagues and employers to complete a
recommendation on your account
• Add people that you meet including recruiters at Career Expos
• Follow up your contacts regularly, use the in-built email or go
directly through their email address
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Use social media for research
• get more info about graduate opportunities , employer
expectations and company culture using Linked In and other
sites
• connect directly with employers and get updates through their
twitter and other accounts
• forums can be a good source of info on recruitment process,
from people who have been through the process and from
employers
o e.g. whirlpool, gradconnection, wikijob etc.
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Gradconnection – employer forum sessions
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whirlpool – posts by Ericsson’s
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KEY POINTS
Networking…
• exchange
• informal or formal
• a career skill for life
• face to face or online
• an opportunity to connect
• requires professional behaviour, wherever it
happens
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Resumes
Your resume is a marketing tool.
It tells your story.
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Will anyone read your resume?
Does it look professional, relevant, clear and concise?
NO / MAYBE / YES
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Will it get you an interview?
Does it clearly demonstrate the specific skills, knowledge
and personal characteristics that the position requires
and the organisation values?
NO / MAYBE / YES
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Your resume should
make it easy for employers
to see what you have to offer.
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1. Keep it concise
•
include key information on the first page
•
focus on key points and dates
•
3 pages at most
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2. Make it easy to read and follow
•
keep the layout clear, simple and uncluttered
•
organise information so it’s easy to follow, using clear headings and sub-headings
•
use dot points for details
•
include page numbers
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3. Provide relevant information
•
highlight your key skills and provide clear evidence of these (and qualities) you claim
to have.
•
use key words that reflect essential aspects of the position description and
organisation.
•
use reverse chronological order, listing the current or most recent activity first
•
adapt your resume for each job application so it accurately reflects the key skills, and
other requirements, of the job you are applying for.
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4. Use it to demonstrate your skills in…
•
researching, assembling and presenting relevant information
•
writing, editing and proof-reading
•
paying attention to detail
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Your resume has a job to do
Summarise and give evidence of the
qualifications, skills, experience and qualities
you have that match an employer’s specific job
and workplace requirements.
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What do employers want?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Interpersonal & communication skills
Passion, knowledge of industry, drive, commitment, attitude
Analytical, problem solving skills
Calibre of academic results
Work experience
Values fit, cultural alignment
Emotional intelligence
Teamwork
Extracurricular activities
Leadership skills
Source: 2013 Graduate Careers Australia Employer Survey
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Employers want to know about the
transferable skills & qualities you
have, as well as your university
degree and academic results.
What you’ve done in the past suggests
what you can do for an employer
now & in the future.
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Use your Resume to show employers
that you have what they want
EXAMPLES
Interpersonal and communication skills (written and oral)
• quality of your resume, studies, activities, communication with employer
Passion/ knowledge of industry
• studies, professional development, professional memberships, practical
experience
Work experience
• volunteering, part-time work, internships, paid work in your industry
Teamwork skills
• uni projects, sports, clubs and societies, part-time work,
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Communicate your selling points
1. Where are you heading and what can you offer?
2. What can you do for an organisation?
3. How up-to-date is your knowledge of your
discipline/industry/profession?
4. What added value or potential do you have?
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1. Where are you heading and what can you offer?
Career Objective
EXAMPLE
I am seeking a graduate role in government where I can contribute my
research and analytical skills to the development of policies in youth
justice and community engagement.
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3 ASPECTS of strong career objectives
1.
specific & targeted – e.g. graduate role, government
2.
demonstrate motivation and awareness of the different sectors of
industry – e.g. what you can contribute, areas of interest, industry
language
3.
not too vague or general – e.g. specific about key skills
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2. What can you do for an organisation?
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2 types of skills
1. industry specific – specialist, technical, expert
2. transferable – general, practical, employable
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• don’t assume that anyone reading your resume will know what
skills you have gained through your degree, placements, parttime work etc.
• identify and assess your own skills and strengths
• communicate them in your resume, job applications and
interviews
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Use action verbs to describe what you’ve done at uni,
on placements and in part-time work.
ORGANISED RESEARCHED reported
generated SUPERVISED monitored
provided WROTE
illustrated handled ADVISED taught planned
translated
used PREPARED managed dealt with
planned assisted REPORTED tested initiated budgeted
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4 TIPS for communicating your skills
1. list your key skills under sub-headings with examples of what
you’ve done
2. use action verbs e.g. researching managing, planning, creating,
analysing, installing
3. provide evidence of where and how you’ve applied specific
skills
4. reflect key words from the position description / duty
statement
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Example
Organisational Skills
• planned and coordinated training sessions for the Eltham Junior
Basketball Team for 3 years
• planned, managed and filled fortnightly rosters for up to 12
staff at the Toys ‘R’Us Brunswick store for 18 months including
two peak Christmas periods.
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FACT
Including details of your skills or competencies
in your resume
increases your chance of
being offered an interview by 30%.
Bright and Earl, 2007
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3. How up-to-date is your knowledge of your
discipline/industry/profession?
Show your awareness and active participation through...
• student placements or internships
• volunteer work
• paid work
• active membership of professional association/s
• extra-curricular activities
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4. What added value or potential do you have?
Achievements
•
How and when did you positively affect... a project, a community, an organisation,
the bottom line, your boss, your co-workers, your clients?
•
What awards, commendations, publications, etc., have you achieved that relate to
your career objective?
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Examples of relevant achievements
•
holding positions of responsibility
•
increasing sales figures
•
running a project to change something in your university, community, company
•
winning an award or prize
•
achieving good results in exams or assessments
•
gaining additional qualifications
•
receiving customer service / quality awards
•
managing achievements outside of your studies or workplace, such as raising
money for charity, being elected to a committee
•
achieving as an individual or in group sports
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2 ways to detail your achievements in your resume
1. Provide details under different sub-headings in your resume.
EDUCATION
Bachelor of Business (Marketing)
2011 - Current
La Trobe University, Bendigo
Anticipated completion date: Nov 2014)
• Invited to join the Golden Key International Honour Society (membership offered to
top 15% of academic achievers)
• La Trobe University Student Career Mentoring Program (2013)
2. Create a single list of examples
ACHIEVEMENTS
• created..
• awarded…
• recognised…
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Create a strong resume
KEY POINTS
1. Do your research.
2. Tailor your resume for each job and every application.
3. Identify and communicate your skills and strengths.
4. Use action verbs and key words that show you match the skills
and other requirements of the job.
5. Get input from others – online career resources, La Trobe
University Resume Booth, mentors, friends.
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Online Applications
Online application forms
• 77% of employers have an online application process
• Designed for you to provide evidence that you have the skills
and attributes matching the key selection criteria
• The selection process has started – applications will be either
shortlisted or rejected
• Filling out application forms can be time consuming - allow at
least 1.5 -2 hours per application
• Good quality applications take time
Source: Unigrad 2012
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Before you start your application
• Do your research so that you know what the employer wants
and what skills they are looking for.
• Research the organisation (company website, Linked In,
YouTube, internet search, newspapers etc)
• Research the position (key selection criteria, position
description)
• Think about yourself and what you have to offer (your skills,
experience, qualities etc)
• Use this research to tailor your application
• Keep your answers structured, clear
and concise.
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Tips for online applications
• Diarise the application closing date and submit your application
well before then
• Allow plenty of time to complete the application form
• Employers often have specific instructions - read and follow
these instructions completely
• Stick to word limits – applications that exceed these limits
often will not be considered
• Proof-read to avoid spelling and grammar errors
• Ensure your documentation uses formal business language
• Save files in a version that anyone can open
• Keep a copy of your submitted application
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Types of questions asked by employers
Open questions
Behavioural questions
Technical questions related to your discipline (e.g. case study/
scenario)
Closed questions
Requiring right/wrong or yes/no answers
More common in assessment tasks, exams, tests
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Example Open Questions
Questions about you
• Why did you choose to study this major/degree?
• Tell us about yourself
• Which of your placements did you like the most? The least?
Why?
• Where do you see yourself in five years' time?
• What are your strengths/ weaknesses?
Questions about the role and organisation
• Why have you applied for this job?
• What interests you about this position?
• What do you know about our organisation?
• Why would you like to work for this organization?
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Sample Online Question
Question
Why do you want to work for the Victorian Public Service as
opposed to other graduate opportunities? What do you feel
you could contribute to the work done by the Victorian Public
Service? Please limit your response to 250 words or less.
Information that exceeds these limits will not be considered.
(42 words in the question)
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Developing answers to open questions
Demonstrate self-awareness on main issues
• your skills and qualities, both personal and professional
• how you chose this career pathway
• motivation: why working in this industry and occupation is
important to you
• what makes you passionate about your work in general and
this job in particular?
Link your own story to the industry and the organisation
• use your research – what skills & capabilities are valued for
this position, by the organisation, and by the industry?
• based on this, identify your key selling points for this
position
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Behavioural Questions
Types of questions: behavioural questions
Behavioural/Competency-Based Questions
• Used at application and interview stages
• Companies identify the competencies required to do the job
– these form the basis of the questions
• “We can predict future performance from past behaviour”
• You are asked to discuss concrete EXAMPLES from your own
experiences to prove you possess the required competencies
Cues:
• “Tell me about a time when….”
• “Give an example of …….”
• “Describe a situation…..”
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Example Questions
Teamwork
“ Can you give me an example of a time when you have
been part of a team that successfully completed a
task?”
Innovation/creativity
“Give me an example when you had the opportunity to
come up with a creative solution to a problem. How
did you arrive at the solution?
Problem solving
“Describe a situation when you had to solve a problem
that required careful thought. What did you do?”
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Sample Online Behavioural Question
Question
Please provide an example of a time when you had to work as
part of a team to accomplish an objective. Describe the task,
what your role in the team was, and what outcomes the team
achieved. Please limit your response to 250 words or less.
Information that exceeds these limits will not be considered.
(46 words in the question)
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Use the STAR Approach
 Describe the Situation / context
 Identify the Task / challenge you encountered
 Describe the Action you took
 Specify the Result or outcome
• Provide specific examples, preferably from last 2-3 years.
• Use real examples from a range of contexts such as your studies,
placements, employment, Voluntary work, sports, mentoring,
interests/clubs etc.
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Situation
Describe the situation / environment you were in
Include context, details and time.
Task
What did you need to accomplish to deal with the situation?
What was your role concerning the problem, issue or
assignment?
Action
What did you do? **The Most Important Part **
Set out the steps you took to resolve the situation
Provide detail – how you listened to the unhappy customer.
What strategy did you use to manage your time? How did you
influence your team?
Result
What happened? What did you accomplish? What did you
learn?
Promote yourself and your achievements
If it is employment-related ,link the result back to the
organisation. What was the benefit to the organisation?
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How are your responses evaluated?
Your answers to behavioural questions are evaluated
• Each STAR is given a numerical rating
• Interviewers work to a definition of each competency. They
focus on Action and Result to determine how effective your
behaviour was.
• Each STAR is rated in terms of:
 Similarity/Relevancy (to competency definition)
 Impact (i.e. what was the effect of your action?)
 Recency (of example)
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Behavioural competency
Verbal Communication
• Clearly explains information and listens to feedback
• Uses a polite and considerate manner when dealing with others
• Confidently conveys ideas and information in a clear and
interesting way
• Understands and meets the needs of target audience
• Sees things from others points of view and confirms
understanding
Source: VPS Graduate Candidate Guide 2014
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Example response
Behavioural Question: Give an example of when you had to
clearly explain information to a person.
This is something that I have to do regularly in my part-time
role as a sales assistant at my local newsagent. We not only sell
items from the newsagency but as we are next to a train station
that is only staffed from 6am to 2pm, we often have inquiries
from train passengers. Four months ago, an elderly lady came
in to the shop in a confused state. She had got on the wrong
train and kept saying “This isn’t the Moorabbin train station”.
(Situation and Task)
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Candidate Response 1 (with minimal preparation)
I outlined to the elderly lady where she was and explained
patiently where she needed to go, and I also used a map to do
this. She still didn’t seem to understand after I went through it
a second time so I made her comfortable while I phoned her
daughter.
(Action)
As a result, the daughter drove over to the newsagency and
the elderly lady was reunited with her family. The daughter was
appreciative and wrote a thank you letter to the newsagency .
My boss was pleased with how I handled the situation and
offered me first choice of shifts on the next roster. (Result)
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Candidate Response 2 (with preparation)
I calmly explained to her which station she was at and I asked
her where she had started her train journey that morning. I
found out she was from Bendigo so was not that familiar with
the Melbourne train system and was feeling lost and
overwhelmed. I made her comfortable by getting her a chair.
After a few minutes of rest, I clarified with her to make sure she
did actually want to go to Moorabbin. I showed her a copy of
the Melbourne train map and explained in a patient manner
where she was, and which train line she needed to be on to go
to Moorabbin. When she continued to be confused, I asked
her if there was someone I could phone for her. I phoned her
daughter, explained who I was, why I was phoning and gave her
directions to the newsagency. (Action)
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Candidate Response 2 …
As a result, the daughter drove over to the newsagency and the
elderly lady was reunited with her family. The daughter was
appreciative and wrote a thank you letter to the newsagency.
My boss at the newsagency has a strong customer focus and
wants the newsagency to be regarded as a community hub,
which will also make his business more sustainable. He was
pleased with how I had handled the situation and gave me first
choice of shifts when the next roster came out. (Result)
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Build up your own ‘skills bank’ of examples
Skills
Academic studies
Placement/
Internship
Employment
Volunteering,
extra- curricular
Communication
Teamwork
Problem solving
Planning &
organising
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Interviews
The best interview ever…
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Why an interview?
The employer’s objective is to attract and appoint the best
candidate for the job. An interview is used to find out:
• Can you do the job? Do you have the skills, knowledge and
experience appropriate for the role?
• Will you do the job? What’s your motivation? Are you
enthusiastic about the position and the organisation?
• Will you fit in? Do you fit into the team, within the
organisation’s culture and workplace environment?
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Phone screening
• Many organisations conduct a brief phone interview early in
the selection process
• This can happen when you least expect it. If the timing is
inconvenient let them know when would be more suitable
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Tips for phone interviews
• Treat a phone interview as seriously as a face to face interview
• Have your resume and application handy but don’t be
distracted by them
• Ensure your phone is fully charged and that you have good
reception
•
Answer your phone in a professional manner
• Take the call in quiet place, free from interruptions
• Speak clearly and smile
• Ensure that your voicemail message is professional
• At the end, thank the interviewer for their time
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Example open and behavioural interview questions
Open questions
Why are you interested in this graduate program? Qantas
What do you know about our business? PricewaterhouseCoopers
What would you do differently if you were given the opportunity?
Schweppes Australia
Behavioural questions
Give me an example of a time when you used good judgement and logic
in solving a problem. St George Bank
Tell me about a time when you saw an opportunity and drove it
forward? How did you spot the opportunity? Victorian Public Service
Tell me about a time when you lead the team to a positive result?
Telstra
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Example Technical questions
Questions may relate to the content of the job, a case study, a
clinical scenario (e.g. for health science) or current trends
within the industry.
Can you explain what a public good is, why the government may
provide public good and give an example? Economist stream,
Victorian Public Service
What do you consider to be the essential elements of an effective
classroom management plan, particularly when working with a
new group? Victorian Department of Education
How has online media affected the way we consume technology?
Telstra
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Preparing for behavioural interview questions
•
Review the selection criteria and think of questions related to each
competency or skill
•
Prepare specific examples from a range of recent experiences –
study, placements, paid or voluntary work, sport, hobbies/clubs etc.
•
Use STAR approach. Practice responding to questions out loud
•
Make it clear what you specifically did if you worked in a team
•
Describe the Situation and Task concisely so you can focus on the
Action and Result parts of your example.
•
Be prepared for negative questions
Example - Tell me about a time when you were part of a team that
did not accomplish all of its goals. NAB
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Strategies to succeed at interview
Research and prepare
• The position and the organisation
• Know yourself – your motivation, experiences, skills etc. (What
can you offer? )
Prior to the Interview
• Organise your dress, journey and ensure your phone is off.
During the Interview
• Build rapport using interpersonal skills (eye contact, smile, firm
handshake..)
• Communicate clearly – keep it to the point, structured and
balanced between not talking too little/ too much
• Try to relax
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Additional interview resources
• http://career-ready.blogs.latrobe.edu.au/
• Book a practice interview with a Careers Consultant
 http://www.seek.com.au/jobs-resources/interview-questions
• http://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/intervw.htm
• Youtube employer channels for interview tips e.g.
http://www.youtube.com/user/accentureuscareers
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blJwjfDqcvA
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Interview Activity
Interview Activity
Prepare
5 mins
Question
&
Feedback
Interviewer
Question
&
Feedback
5 mins
& Applicant
5 mins
2 Roles
Swap
Roles
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Interview Questions
Choose one of the following interview questions to answer.
• Can you tell me about a time when you had a problem to solve, and
found there were many ways to go about solving it. How did you go
about solving this problem and what were the steps that you took?
• Tell us about a time when you were asked to do something you didn’t
agree with, how you managed this situation and how you would
manage this in the future?
• Describe a situation when you saw a problem and took action to correct it
rather than waiting for someone else to do so.
•
Can you describe a time when you were not particularly pleased with your
performance.
• Can you please tell the panel of a time you were working on either an
individual or group task at university and you encountered obstacles and
roadblocks on the way, How did you tackle these? What were the
outcomes?
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Interview Activity - Feedback
• ‘Interviewer’ provide feedback considering:
- the person’s eye contact, non-verbal behaviour
- how engaged/involved they were
- did their answer cover all aspects of a STAR?
- did they provide a specific example?
- how clear, structured and coherent was their answer?
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Panel Graduate Employers
Panellists
• Rachel Kelsey, Senior Business Partner, Bendigo and Adelaide
Bank
• Summer Lawrence, Campus Recruitment Coordinator, Ernst &
Young
• Heidi Van Wyngaarden, Scientific Consultant, Kelly Scientific
Resources
• Nova Barro, Graduate Recruitment Consultant, KPMG
• Natalie Gibbons, Policy and Program Adviser, Victoria Public
Sector Commission
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Interview Questions
• Can you tell me about a time when you had a problem to solve, and
found there were many ways to go about solving it. How did you go
about solving this problem and what were the steps that you took?
• Tell us about a time when you were asked to do something you didn’t
agree with, how you managed this situation and how you would
manage this in the future?
• Describe a situation when you saw a problem and took action
to correct it rather than waiting for someone else to do so.
• Can you describe a time when you were not particularly
pleased with your performance.
• Can you please tell the panel of a time you were working on
either an individual or group task at university and you
encountered obstacles and roadblocks on the way, How did you
tackle these? What were the outcomes?
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Thank you
Contact Us:
Bundoora:
Level 1, Peribolos East
9479 2459
www.latrobe.edu.au/students/careers
[email protected]
@LTUcareers
www.facebook.com/LaTrobeCareers
latrobe.edu.au/students/careers
CRICOS Provider 00115M

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