The Role of HR in future of Myanmar

Report
• “You can’t cross the sea,
• by standing and staring at the water.”
NEW MYANMAR
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Democratically anchored
Economically vibrant
Socially inclusive
Environmentally sustainable
3
‘MYANMAR SPRING’
• Extraordinary, Unprecedented and
Unimaginable!
• Rapid speed of recent changes
• Peaceful revolution
• Top-down
‘MYANMAR SPRING’
• Brink of a momentous economic
flowering
• Most important period of political
transition
• Reconciliation and addressing longneglected needs
TODAY'S REALITIES
• Very interesting and exciting
• Volatile and Chaotic
8
CAPACITY
• Ability of people, organizations and
society
• Manage affairs successfully. …
9
CAPACITY
• Ability of individuals, institutions, and
societies
• Perform functions
• Solve problems
• Set and achieve objectives
• Sustainable manner …
10
CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT
(CD)
• Process whereby people, organizations
and society
• Unleash, strengthen, create, adapt and
maintain capacity
11
CD
• National commitment to fighting poverty
• Negotiate, manage, oversee and
effectively utilize resources for human
development
12
CD
• ‘Endogenous’ - domestically driven
process
• Indispensable for development
effectiveness
13
COUNTRY’S CAPACITY
• Enabling environment
• Organisations
• Individual
14
CD
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•
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More rigorous approach –more evidence-based
Mutual accountability
Knowledge services and learning, incentive systems
Institutional reform
Change management
Leadership development
15
CD
1. Strengthened national or local capacities
2. Optimize existing capacities
16
17
PARIS DECLARATION ON AID
EFFECTIVENESS
• Signed by more than 100 multilateral and
bilateral donors and developing countries
• Capacity to plan, manage, implement, and
account for results
• Critical for achieving objectives
18
PARIS DECLARATION ON AID
EFFECTIVENESS
• Developing countries make capacity
development a key goal of national
development strategies
19
CAPACITY
• Cannot be imported
• Developed from within
• Donors acting as catalysts, facilitators,
and brokers of knowledge and technique.
20
CD
•
•
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Heart of the Reform Agenda
Driver of aid effectiveness
Prescriptive policy
Incorporating into existing and new
projects
21
CD
• Persistently fallen short of expectations
• Why?
22
WHY?
• Lack of consensus
• Operational definition
• Results expected
23
WHY?
• Definitions very broad.
• Lack of clarity
• Difficult to evaluate outcomes and to
understand impact
24
25
CD EFFORTS
• Not grounded in theory
• No consistent conceptual frameworks
26
CD EFFORTS
• Vague
• Processes of change not understood
• Importance of strategy overlooked
27
CD EFFORTS
• Fragmented
• Not founded on rigorous needs
assessments
• Do not include appropriate sequencing of
measures
28
CD EFFORTS
• Comprehensive and sustained approach
• Builds permanent capacity
• Tools to track, monitor, and evaluate
29
30
• “Faith is the bird that feels the light and
sings
• when the dawn is still dark.”
CDF
• Priority strategies, initiatives and tools
• Address national and local capacity
needs
• MDG-framed poverty reduction
strategies
32
CDF
• Capacity assessments
• Capacity development indicators
33
CDF
• Results-oriented approach
• Learning
34
CDF
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Powerful new approach
Design,
Implementation,
Monitoring
Management
Evaluation
35
CDF
• Step-by-step guide to the planning,
implementation, and evaluation
• Build capacity for development at a
national or sub-national level
36
CDF
• Various strands
1. Change theory
2. Capacity economics
3. Pedagogical science
4. Project management
5. Monitoring and evaluation
37
CDF
• Rigorous, practical instrument
• Focus on capacity factors that impede the
achievement of development goals
• Learning interventions supporting locally
driven change
38
CDF
• Addresses long-standing criticisms of
capacity development work
• Lack of clear definitions
• Coherent conceptual frameworks
• Effective monitoring of results
39
CDF
• Clarify objectives
• Assess prevailing capacity factors
• Identify appropriate agents of change
and change processes
• Guide the design of effective learning
activities
40
CDF
• Results chain
• Stakeholders think through and trace
relationships
• Broad range of situations and
approaches to change management
41
CDF
• Key actors in the change process
identified
• Offered knowledge and tools
• Experimentation and learning that
promote harmonization
42
CDF
• Promotes a common and systematic
approach to the identification, design,
and monitoring and evaluation of
learning
• Raising the effectiveness of resources
devoted
43
CDF
1. Building capacity
2. Driving change
3. Achieving development goals
• Iterative process
44
CDF STEPS
1. Validate goals
2. Assess relevant capacity factors
3. Decide changes in capacity factors facilitated by
learning
4. Specify objective(s) of the learning program
5. Identify agents of change and envision the change
process
45
CDF STEPS
6. Set intended learning outcomes and indicators
7. Design activities
8. Monitor learning outcomes and adjust as necessary
9. Monitor targeted capacity factors and progress toward goals;
adjust program as necessary
10. Assess achievement of learning outcomes and targeted
changes
46
KEY FEATURES
• Transformational learning interventions
• Locally owned changes in sociopolitical,
policy-related, and organizational factors
• Individuals and groups of individuals
agents of change
47
KEY FEATURES
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Instruments
Transformational role
Embedded learning interventions
Targeted individuals or groups
48
CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT AS A PART OF THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
GOAL
CAPACITY
Local ownership, effectiveness and efficiency
of resource use
Change
LEARNING
49
LEARNING
• Lead to changes
• Efficiency of policy and other formal
incentive instruments
• Improving clarity
• Legitimacy
• Resistance to corruption
50
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“Reach high,
for stars lie hidden in you.
Dream deep,
for every dream precedes the goal.”

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